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RAMP Application

School Information

Our school has received the RAMP designation previously and is applying to Re-Ramp: Yes
Have you or another counselor(s) in your school received formal, in person training or coaching on the ASCA National Model or RAMP in the past two years?:
Does your school receive funds from the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program?: No
School Name: Lucile Bruner Elementary
School Address: 4289 Allen Lane North Las Vegas, 89032
School District Name: Clark County
School Twitter Handle:
School year RAMP application represents: 2016-2017
Number of students in district: 321,000
Grade Category: e
Grade levels served at school: 7
Number of students at school: 710
Number of certified staff at school: 53
Number of Full-time school counselors at school: 1
Number of Part-time school counselors at school: 0
Average number of students served by each school counselor: 710
School setting: Urban
Percentage of students identified as special education students: 18.9%
Percentage of students who receive free or reduced lunch: 79.8%

Percent Black: 24
Percent Hispanic: 54
Percent White: 10
Percent Native American: 0
Percent Asian: 4
Percent Other: 7

Names of other school counselors at school:
n/a

Names of other personnel:
Lindia Key - School Social Worker

Written Portions and File Attachments

1. Vision Statement
School Counseling Program Vision Statement:
Every student at Lucile Bruner Elementary School is a proficient student, responsible citizen, productive worker, and lifelong learner that contributes positively in a diverse society. Every Bruner student graduates college and career ready while acknowledging his/her responsibility to learn and strive to achieve his/her full academic and personal potential.

School Counseling Program Beliefs:
The Lucile Bruner Elementary school counselor believes that:
*Every student has his/her own unique gifts and talents in which they excel.
*Every student can achieve with proper support, guidance and education.
*Every student has the responsibility to learn and solve his/her problems in a positive way.
*Every student has the right to access and participate in a comprehensive school counseling program administered by a state licensed, Master’s degree level school counselor.

The Lucile Bruner Elementary School Counseling Program should:
*Be student focused.
*Advocate for the academic, social/emotional and college/career needs of every student.
*Be designed and administered by the school counselor in collaboration with educators, administration, parents, students and community members.
*Be based on specific standards and developmental competencies set forth by Clark County School District, State of Nevada and ASCA.
*Use data to guide program development, evaluation and enhancement.
*Be preventative and proactive when addressing the needs of all students and the school.
*Support and promote the school’s goals for student success and the superintendent’s “Every student in every classroom” vision.
*Be a fundamental agent in the promotion of a safe, caring and respectful school climate for every student.

The Lucile Bruner Elementary School Counselor will:
*Adhere to the professional school counselor ethical code of standards outlined in ASCA guidelines and Clark County School District’s policies.
*Participate in professional development activities to strengthen and maintain an effective comprehensive school counseling program.

School Vision Statement:
1. We believe that all students can learn.
2. We believe that all individuals are gifted in some way.
3. We believe that learning is continuous and has no limits.
4. We believe that all students have the right to be educated and the responsibility to learn.
5. We believe that education fosters the development of each individual: emotionally, socially, intellectually, and physically.
6. We believe that high expectations foster academic excellence.
7. We believe that the school should respect and promote diversity.
8. We believe that learning occurs in a safe, nurturing environment with mutual respect, and responsibility.
9. We believe that parents and the school share responsibility for developing character, ethics, and manners.
10. We believe that school prepares individuals to positively contribute to a changing society.
11. We believe that students are responsible for their behavior and for solving problems in a positive way.
12. We believe that individuals are accountable for their actions and will accept logical consequences of behavior.
13. We believe that a positive relationship between families and schools is a crucial element in a student’s educational success. 14. We believe that education is a cooperative partnership in which students, parents, staff, business/labor, and community share responsibility.

District Vision Statement:
All students progress in school and graduate prepared to succeed and contribute in a diverse global society.
We believe: *All students can achieve, learn and succeed irrespective of their circumstances. *Students share responsibility for their learning. *Each student is entitled to an excellent education that meets his or her individual learning needs. *All students who are willing to work hard have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs necessary to reach their full potential, to succeed and to contribute in a diverse global society.

Narrative: The counseling department at Lucile Bruner Elementary developed its first vision statement in 2011. During that school year, the Clark County School District (CCSD) Guidance and Counseling Department began urging school counselors to align their programs with the ASCA National Model. Encouraged by the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department, Bruner’s school counseling program applied and received the ASCA RAMP Award in 2014. Prior to applying for the award, the vision statement was rewritten to align more closely with an ASCA National Model program. The vision statement was updated in 2015-16, based on the recommendations of ASCA National Model trainers who presented to CCSD school counselors. The recommendation to update the vision statement to reflect current verbiage used by school counselors, educators, and the new school superintendent was put into effect. The school counseling vision statement communicates my hopes for every student attending Bruner Elementary.

There are two fundamental beliefs that drive my counseling program. The first is that every student has unique gifts and talents in which they can excel with proper support, guidance, and education. The second is that every student is responsible to learn and solve his/her problems in a positive way in order to be proficient students, responsible citizens, productive workers, and lifelong learners. These fundamental beliefs align with eleven of Bruner’s fourteen Belief Statements. Three of Bruner’s Belief Statements describe what parents and/or educators should do for students. These three beliefs were not incorporated into my counseling vision statement because of my belief that a school counseling vision should be student focused. I felt it more appropriate to incorporate them into my counseling program mission statement. For collaborating with stakeholders is how my school counseling program will reach its vision.

My belief statement “every student has the right to access and participate in a comprehensive school counseling program administered by a state licensed, Master’s degree level school counselor” was not included in the school counseling vision statement. Although there have been discussions amongst CCSD administrators about whether to employ full time school counselors or school social workers or both, I desired for my counseling program vision statement to remain as student focused as possible. My belief statement is demonstrated daily within my school and district through my leadership and advocacy.

Bruner’s counseling department supports the CCSD Superintendent Philosophy Statement that all school district employees will reach to ensure that “every student in every classroom, without exceptions, without excuses” graduates ready for success after high school. The previous superintendent had a similar vision statement that stated all students would be “Ready by exit.” Both philosophies see students prepared to enter college or the workforce after high school graduation with the knowledge and skills needed to perform successfully in either environment. I believe a comprehensive counseling program guided by the school’s data will prepare students to be positive contributors in society as the district superintendent and school board envision. After collaborating with other school counselors in the district, I believed it to be important to incorporate the vision statements of both superintendents and the school board into my counseling program vision statement. Having every student at Bruner Elementary graduate college and career ready is what I envision in the future.
The most significant verbiage change made between the former and current counseling vision statements is the use of the words “every student” instead of “all students.” I have observed this change to perspective of equity in professional school counseling articles, as well as with the district’s current superintendent. The use of “every student” implies close attention will be given to each student to provide what each student needs. This implication supports my belief that every student can achieve with proper support, guidance, and education. Due to my belief and the implication, the wording in the previous counseling vision statements was changed from “all students” to “every student” in the current vision statement and school counselor belief statements. The simple change in verbiage now truly reflects my desired future for each of Bruner’s students.

The vision of my school counseling program is centered on the academic and personal growth of every student to bring forth proficient, responsible, and productive citizens. It’s clear, inspiring, and achievable. It encouraged me to not accept additional responsibilities that were not considered direct or indirect services for students. Displaying my counseling vision in my office informs all stakeholders what my dedication is and reminds me to focus on counseling activities that will help foster the desired result.

Attached Files:
2. Mission Statement:
School Mission Statement: Working together, the staff, students, parents, and community of Lucile S. Bruner are dedicated to building a supportive, risk-free environment that empowers learners with knowledge, skills, confidence, and respect for individual differences so that all students become positive contributors to society.

School Counseling Mission Statement: The mission of Lucile Bruner’s counseling department is to provide and advocate for an equitable, relevant, and data driven comprehensive counseling program designed to advance the academic, social/emotional and college/career development of every student. In accordance with national, state, and school district standards, the school counseling department strives to help every student acquire knowledge, skills, attitudes, and mindsets necessary to be become a proficient student, responsible citizen, productive worker, and lifelong learner that contributes positively in a diverse society. Through collaboration with school stakeholders, the counseling department ensures the needs and goals of every student are addressed.

Narrative:
The mission of Lucile Bruner’s counseling department is to provide and advocate for an equitable, relevant, and data driven comprehensive counseling program designed to advance the academic, social/emotional, and college/career development of every student. In accordance with national, state, and school district standards, the school counseling department strives to help every student acquire knowledge, skills, attitudes, and mindsets necessary to be become a proficient student, responsible citizen, productive worker, and lifelong learner that contributes positively in a diverse society. Through collaboration with school stakeholders, the counseling department ensures the needs and goals of every student are addressed.

The counseling department at Bruner Elementary developed its first vision and mission statements in 2011. During that school year, the Clark County School District (CCSD) Guidance and Counseling Department began urging school counselors to align their counseling programs with the ASCA National Model. Encouraged by the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department, Bruner’s school counseling program applied and received the RAMP Award in 2014. Prior to applying for the award, the mission statement was rewritten to represent an ASCA National Model program. My current mission statement was developed after in-depth trainings provided to CCSD school counselors in 2015-16 by ASCA trainers on the National Model. The ASCA trainers recommended updating the verbiage to align with the current verbiage used by school counselors, educators, and the new school superintendent. The recommendations were put into effect to reflect the current needs and goals of Bruner’s students after collaborating with other school district counselors and members of the school’s advisory council.

The most significant verbiage change made between the former and current counseling mission statements is the use of the words “every student” instead of “all students.” Utilizing the word ‘every’ moves my counseling mission from a perspective of equality to a perspective of equity. Although both perspectives stem from fairness, equity indicates that each student is given what he/she needs to be successful. According to ASCA, school counselors provide closing the gap activities to address issues of equity in student achievement. Stating that my counseling program’s mission is to provide an equitable comprehensive school counseling program necessitates verbiage that promotes exactly that. Stating that “every student” will advance in academic, social/emotional, and college/career development supports my belief that every student at Bruner Elementary, whether in a general education classroom, special education program, or in a self contained classroom, will be proficient, responsible, productive, and a lifelong learner that contributes positively in society.

The main focus of my counseling program mission is to empower every student with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and mindsets necessary to achieve academic, social/emotional, and college/career success through a data driven comprehensive counseling program partnered with stakeholders. It provides the direction for my counseling program to attain its vision. Describing the type of student, citizen, and worker I envision each Bruner student becoming unites my vision and mission statements, while reminding me of my counseling program’s focus. My counseling program’s mission is obtained through utilizing school data to create school counseling activities, collaborating with stakeholders, participating in professional development, and creating a supportive environment.

Components of the school’s mission statement and that of the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department were incorporated to create a more comprehensive and relevant mission statement for my counseling program. The advisory council believed it was necessary for my counseling program mission to support the school’s 23 year old mission, as well as reflect the mission of professional school counselors. My counseling program mission statement expanded on the school’s mission statement to include the role of the counselor and to identify it as part of the ‘staff’ working together with stakeholders. The advisory council believed the use of the word ‘staff’ in the school’s mission statement was not sufficient enough to describe the role a school counselor plays in helping students succeed. In addition, “risk free environment” was not included in the counseling program mission statement due to the uncertainty of the founding staff’s meaning. The advisory council agreed that a “relevant” comprehensive counseling program indicated the school counseling department would provide a program that addressed current needs of the students whether academic, social, or emotional. My counseling program mission statement is linked to that of the Guidance and Counseling Department through reference to a data driven comprehensive counseling program, ASCA’s developmental domains, and the standards of CCSD, Nevada, and ASCA. Bruner’s mission statement and that of the Guidance and Counseling Department support the beliefs expressed by my counseling program vision and are essential to its mission.

Attached Files:
3. School Counseling Program Goals:

Goal 1:
By June 2017, the number of office discipline referrals for unkind behaviors towards others committed by current 3rd grade students will decrease by 15% from 89 in 2015-16 to 76 in 2016-17.

  • Anger Management
  • Behavioral Issues
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Violence Prevention
Goal 2:
By June 2017, the number of 4th and 5th grade students who earn a failing grade (F) in reading will decrease by 70% from 33 (1st Quarter Progress Report) to 10 (2nd Semester Report Card).

  • Academic Achievement
  • Career Development
  • Postsecondary Preparation
Goal 3:
By June 2017, the number of African American students with 10 or more unexcused absences will decrease by 50% from 13 during the 1st semester to 6 during the 2nd semester.

  • Academic Achievement
  • Behavioral Issues
  • Attendance

Narrative:
The 2016-17 counseling program goals addressed the academic, behavior, and attendance struggles of the students at Bruner Elementary. Prior to the school year starting, I reviewed the District’s Accountability Report, Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) Scores, School’s Goals, Bruner’s Nevada Report Card, office discipline referrals, and attendance records to assess the needs of the students. The data collected from these sources was used to create my counseling program goals. I met with administration to discuss the school’s data and the counseling department’s plans on how to best meet the academic and social/emotional needs of every student. Both the administration and advisory council supported my counseling program goals that were designed to improve student proficiency and behavior. The goals provided a foundation for the core counseling curriculum and defined how the counseling department’s vision and mission would be accomplished.

Goal #1
During the 2015-16 school year, there were 463 office discipline referrals. Of these referrals, 89 were for 2nd graders. This particular group of students had the second highest number of referrals in 2015-16 and the highest in 2014-15. This data provided the basis for my counseling program goal of reducing the number of office discipline referrals for the current third grade students. Instead of implementing the goal school-wide, I focused on the group of students who demonstrated a history of inappropriate behaviors. After analyzing office referrals for the types of incidents, I chose a classroom guidance unit on coping skills. Small counseling groups to address self-control and individual counseling sessions were additional activities provided to meet the program goal. End of year data revealed the number of office referrals for 3rd graders was 44, surpassing the program goal. My program goal was important because when students develop more effective coping strategies, they are in class more often and better able to pay attention. This goal supports my program’s vision that every student “acknowledges his/her responsibility to learn and strive to achieve his/her full academic and personal potential.”

Goal #2
Bruner’s 2015-16 SBAC results revealed 37% of 4th graders and 27.6% of 3rd graders were proficient in reading. The results were significantly below the state and district’s overall proficiency scores of 47% and 46% respectively. At the end of the 1st quarter in 2016-17, Progress Reports showed that 27 fifth graders and 6 fourth graders were failing in reading. In order to meet the requirements of Nevada’s Read by Grade 3 Act, four strategists at Bruner focused on improving the reading skills of students in grades K-3. No additional services beyond RTI were provided for 4th and 5th graders. The SBAC results, Progress Reports and lack of additional reading assistance provided the foundation for my counseling program goal of improving reading grades for 4th and 5th grade students. After collaborating with 5th grade teachers and members of the advisory council, I chose a classroom guidance unit on study skills. Additional classroom guidance lessons on secondary requirements, post secondary choices and career awareness supported the program goal. End of year data revealed 24 of the 27 fifth graders and all 6 of the fourth graders improved their reading grade to a D or better. My program goal was important because in order to graduate college and career ready, students must demonstrate proficiency in core academic subjects.

Goal #3
During 2015-16, Bruner’s ethnicity group with the lowest Average Daily Attendance (ADA) was African American at 92.85%. Hispanic was 94.46% and Asian 96.21%. In the 1st semester of 2016-17, nineteen students were at-risk for retention due to attendance. Thirteen of these students were African American. AiMSWeb assessments revealed six of the thirteen students were reading at below or well below average levels. One of the 2016-17 school goals was “reduce the percentage point gap between proficiency of highest and lowest scoring subgroups in math and reading.” My closing the gap goal was developed from the ADA, AiMSWeb and the school goal. In collaboration with the social worker, counseling program interventions of individual counseling, community referrals, parent conferences, and reporting educational neglect were implemented based on individual needs. End of year attendance records revealed eight of the thirteen African American students decreased their number of unexcused absences during the 2nd semester and four students improved their overall GPA. My closing the gap goal was important because it was designed to close an achievement gap by increasing the amount of time students were exposed to curriculum. It aligns with my program’s vision and mission.

Supplemental Documents:
4. ASCA Student Standards Competencies and Indicators OR ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors for Student Success:

Attached Files:Narrative:
At Bruner Elementary, specific mindsets and behaviors were selected based on the school’s data, my counseling program’s vision and mission, and requests from administration and teachers. Sources for the school’s data consisted of student scores on the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC), AiMSWeb assessment results, number of office discipline referrals, and Infinite Campus attendance reports. The selected mindsets and behaviors align with my counseling program goals that target the academic and personal growth of every student. The mindsets and behaviors selected for the preschool students were limited to those that applied to the school-wide Sanford Harmony Program due to the preschool program hours and Individualized Education Plans (IEPs).

Prior to the school year starting, I met with administration to discuss my school counseling program plans for the coming school year. During the meeting, my assistant principal requested I work with the school social worker to address the large number of unkind student behaviors and office discipline referrals. I informed both administrators that primary grade level teachers requested study skills lessons as part of my classroom guidance activities. My administration and I agreed that competencies within the academic and social/emotional domains would be a large focus of my counseling program. Since the social worker would be helping to address student behaviors, I stated I would be able to provide more career awareness activities than the previous year like the principal requested. Classroom guidance lessons, small groups, individual counseling sessions, and daily interactions with students were structured to help students acquire learning strategies, self management skills, and social skills.

The advisory council assisted in the selection of Self Management Skills and Social Skills Behaviors that solely addressed the social/emotional needs of Bruner’s students. Demonstrating self control and effective coping skills when faced with a problem were two competencies all stakeholders agreed needed to be addressed. In addition, the implementation of the Sanford Harmony Program provided curriculum that aligned with many of ASCA’s mindsets and behaviors, such as: demonstrating empathy, critical thinking, and self control; creating positive relationships; and a sense of belonging in the school environment. These competencies and those selected by the advisory council, fully supported my counseling program’s goal to reduce office discipline referrals and improve attendance of the students.

The Sanford Harmony Program was designed to help build healthy relationships among students through research based activities. Arizona State University found utilization of the Sanford Harmony Program resulted in improved student achievement, school enjoyment, and empathy, while stereotyping, bullying, teasing, and aggression decreased. Harmony’s unit themes are Diversity and Inclusion, Empathy and Critical Thinking, Communication Peer Relationships, and Problem Solving. Each of these themes supported my counseling program’s vision and mission to help every student acquire knowledge, skills, attitudes, and mindsets necessary to be become a responsible citizen that contributes positively in a diverse society.

My counseling program’s “college and career ready” vision that sees all students prepared to enter college or the workforce after high school graduation with the knowledge and skills needed to perform successfully in either environment provided the foundation for the Learning Strategies Behaviors I selected. Based on the SBAC reading proficiency scores and AiMSWeb assessments, I selected competencies where students acquire skills to improve learning and achieve goals. Competencies such as, identifying long and short term academic and career goals, and using organizational and study skills, were incorporated into my school counseling program’s curriculum through classroom guidance lessons and small groups in order to achieve the goal of improving fourth and fifth graders’ reading scores. Understanding that postsecondary education and lifelong learning are necessary for long term career success is a mindset that supported the vision of the school and my counseling program.

My school counseling program’s core curriculum is centered on standards and competencies that support its mission of maximizing each student’s ability to achieve academic, social/emotional, and career success. Mindsets and Behaviors are reviewed and selected annually, and revisions are made throughout the school year based on school data, student needs, and stakeholder requests.

Supplemental Documents:
5. Annual Agreement:

Attached Files:Narrative:
In the beginning of the 2016-17 school year, I discussed my school counseling program plans based on school data, with the administration, to address student academic, behavior, and attendance concerns. My plans included collaboration with the social worker, classroom guidance lessons, small groups, and individual counseling, implementation of the Sanford Harmony Program school-wide, and parent meetings. Collaboration with the social worker was essential to my counseling program plans due to my medical leave in September and October. During my absence, the social worker provided services that supported my counseling plans. The annual agreement was not formally developed until after my return due to the administration’s insistence that I focus on recovering from surgery. For that reason, the annual agreement was developed and signed after I returned to school. The required signatures were obtained in November, after 1st quarter student data was available and the advisory council had met to discuss specific goals. Since baseline data for my third goal was not available until the end of the 1st semester, the goal section on my annual agreement was incomplete until January. My principal, who is a former school counselor, understood and agreed with my annual agreement, and did not require a formal explanation.

In 2015-16, nearly 45% of my time was spent providing responsive services and less than 10% was in program management. This was largely due to the 463 office discipline referrals and the change in the district’s bullying policy. Although 90% of my time was spent providing direct and indirect services to students, there was an unhealthy imbalance, resulting in all program planning occurring after school hours. Due to the social worker’s willingness to assist with my program behavior goal, my use of time for responsive services, in 2016-17, was planned for 30%. Also, I realized that 4 out of 5 of our self-contained special education classrooms would be staffed with first year teachers and it would be illogical to plan for less time.

In order to achieve more balance, I planned for 15% of my time to be spent in program management, since my fair share duty was only 15 minutes daily before school. Administration reduced my duty time so I could focus more on my program goals and be available to address behavioral concerns when needed. My personal goal of not planning all my counseling program activities at home would also make the 15% achievable.

In the past, my use of time for individual planning did not reach 15%. I planned for 10% of my time to be spent in individual planning since the counseling activities would only consist of helping 5th graders select middle school classes and apply for Magnet school programs, assisting Honor Society members with personal goals, and working with select students to achieve behavior and attendance goals.

The use of time planned for core curriculum was 25% due to my medical leave preventing me from presenting more classroom guidance lessons. The remaining 20% of my time was planned for indirect services. This was influenced by the RTI chairperson and administration requesting I assist teachers with behavior intervention plans, and the social worker assisting me with responsive and indirect services. With a student population of 710, it was necessary for the social worker and me to work effectively together. Along with our schedules, we discussed our strengths and weaknesses to determine which students we were better able to serve. When assigned the same responsibility by administration, we discussed amongst ourselves who would handle what components.

The large percentage of time spent in responsive services and the number of office referrals in 2015-16, motivated me to attend professional development on coping skills and the Sanford Harmony Program. Core curriculum lessons from these trainings were implemented in every classroom to help achieve the goal of reducing the number of office discipline referrals. Participating in the ASCA Model Program trainings offered to all school counselors in the district, as well as, completing ASCA’s Leadership Specialist and Data Specialist courses, reinvigorated me and kept me focused on my program’s mission. Attending the Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG) Parent Support Group Facilitator Training provided me with an opportunity to learn how to better help a highly gifted student that was attending Bruner.

6. Advisory Council:

Attached Files:Advisory Council Members and Stakeholder Positions:
Judy Pelto
School Counselor
Advisory Council Facilitator

Dr. Cathy Conger
Principal
Advisory Member

Eula Burgess
Special Education Teacher
Advisory Member

Angela Gilchrist
Intermediate Grade Level Teacher
Advisory Member

Vilma Ramos
Primary Grade Level Teacher
Advisory Member

Kathy Washburn
Music Teacher Specialist
Advisory Member

Lori Giancola
Art Teacher Specialist
Advisory Member

Lindia Key
Social Worker
Advisory Member

Jennifer Hornyak
Parent
Advisory Member

Dana Everage
Pastor of Vegas Christian Center
Bruner’s Community Partner
Advisory Member

Narrative:
In the Clark County School District (CCSD), secondary level counseling departments consist of a team of school counselors that collaborate to address the needs of the students. At the elementary level, one full time or half time counselor is expected to provide comprehensive counseling services for all of the students. The school counselor to student ratio at Bruner Elementary during the 2016-17 school year was 1 to 710. With such a large counselor/student ratio, I believe it is imperative for an elementary school counselor to have a group of stakeholders to advise and assist with maintaining an effective counseling program.

Bruner’s first advisory council began in 2011. During that school year, the CCSD Guidance and Counseling Department began encouraging school counselors to align their programs with the ASCA National Model. Prior to that time, Bruner’s counseling program activities were designed by the school counselor with input from other school counselors, classroom teachers, and the administration, but on a more informal basis. Following ASCA’s guidelines, I began meeting formally with stakeholders to discuss school data, program goals, and solicit input/feedback about my counseling program. The advisory council’s current members include the school’s counselor, principal, social worker, a primary and an intermediate grade level teacher, a special education teacher, the music specialist, the art specialist, a parent, and a community partner representative. I believe an advisory council should be able to offer input from a variety of perspectives in order to meet the needs of all the students.

*The principal, who is a former school counselor, actively advocates for school counselors with other administrators within CCSD. Her support for the decisions made by the advisory council is essential to the success of the counseling department. It was through her support that the Sanford Harmony Program was implemented to address the counseling program’s goal of reducing the number of office discipline referrals.

*The specialists were invited to join because of their weekly interactions with every student and their willingness to incorporate school counseling activities into their curriculum. Due to their suggestions, every student participated in Career Week and Random Acts of Kindness Week counseling program activities through the four specialists.

*The special education teacher was invited because she is able to assess the needs of the special education students more closely. Due to her input, classroom guidance lessons were provided in the general education classroom for all special education students to better meet their Individualized Education Program goals.

*The classroom teachers were invited to join because they build on classroom guidance lessons with their students and have experience collecting data. The primary level teacher, who acts as a translator, is better able to describe my counseling program to Spanish speaking students and parents as a result of being on the advisory council.

*The parent, who is a former social worker, was invited because of the different perspectives and resources she provides. Due to the knowledge she provided, students were referred to new community agencies to ensure their needs were met.

*The school social worker and I work closely to address the needs of every student. Her inclusion on the advisory council is crucial to achieving the counseling program’s goals. The ideas she shared allowed us to address more behavioral concerns with all students.

*The community partner has mentored several Bruner students during the past two years and utilized counseling program materials. His mentoring focused on students making good decisions, which is essential to the counseling program’s goals to improve attendance, behavior and academics.

The advisory council discussed the school’s counseling program during three advisory council meetings, lunches, through emails and in private meetings. Their input and feedback are shared with me throughout the school year. During the 2016-17 school year, members of the advisory council advised and assisted me with my counseling program goals, scheduling, classroom guidance topics, data collection, small group member selection, the school-wide “Be Kind” program, and the implementation of the Sanford Harmony Program and A/B Honor Roll. Council members’ suggestions to educate parents of kindergarten students of the importance of attending school regularly and to expand on Career Week will be incorporated into the counseling program for the 2017-18 school year. Both suggestions support the school counseling program goals and its vision statement that “every Bruner student graduates college and career ready.”


7. Calendars:

Attached Files:Narrative:
For many years, the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department has provided school counselors with an annual calendar with recommendations for counseling program activities. The recommendations were aligned with the Nevada School Counseling Standards and served as a planning guide. The annual calendar developed by the Guidance and Counseling Department provided the basic framework for the annual calendar I have developed and utilized. My annual calendar has been revised yearly based on the school’s data, and during the 2016-17 school year, it was reformatted to follow the revised ASCA National Model template. Prior to the school year starting, the administration and I discussed my school counseling program plans for the coming school year. The assistant principal requested I work with the school social worker to address the students’ behaviors that resulted in a large number of office discipline referrals in the previous year. A discussion on the possible increase of inappropriate behaviors occurring due to the addition of three autism programs being added to our school was held. Scheduling counseling program activities that addressed behavior was established as a priority. A second priority was established after I expressed my desire to support the school’s goals involving reading proficiency by including a study skills unit into my core curriculum. State mandated activities, such as, writing Foster Care Plans and promoting Nevada Pre-Paid Tuition/UPromise, were added to the list of priorities. Counseling program activities included in my annual calendar represented the priorities, ASCA Standards, and requests from stakeholders.

The development of my weekly calendars was based on several factors, including the schedules of the school, number of classrooms, teacher preferences, and my medical leave. Due to the teacher preparation and lunch schedules, the times available for classroom guidance lessons were limited. Grade levels with the most limited schedules were given first choice on time/day of week for classroom guidance lessons. In spite of the limitations and my six weeks leave, I was able to present my core curriculum in every classroom once a month starting in October. Other factors contributing to the development of my calendar were the needs of the students in the five self-contained special education classrooms and the schedule of the social worker. The social worker and I collaborated daily on our availability to help de-escalate students in emotional and/or behavioral crisis. My weekly calendar was developed to allow flexibility for when I needed to reschedule a counseling program activity.

81% of my time was spent providing direct and indirect services for students on the fall weekly calendar, and 82% on the spring weekly calendar. Both percentages aligned with my annual agreement. The use of time for responsive services was 23% on the fall calendar and did not align well with the annual agreement. This discrepancy was the result of the office staff not wishing to overexert me after my surgery, and referring teachers/students to the social worker for immediate needs. On the spring weekly calendar, my use of time in responsive services was 28% and more closely aligned with my annual agreement. There was a discrepancy in use of time for program planning and system support on both weekly calendars compared to the annual agreement. This discrepancy was the result of how I chose to categorize my lunch time. On most days, the principal and I ate lunch together discussing students, classrooms, programs, trainings, and the school district, along with personal topics. I chose to categorize my lunch time as fair share due to our variety of topics and not documenting how I spent each lunch. In reality, my use of time was higher for indirect services and lower in program planning.

The annual and weekly calendars displayed my counseling program activities, how they were delivered and ASCA Mindsets/Behaviors that were applicable. My calendars were adjusted throughout the school year based on the needs of the school. Other factors contributing to the development of my calendar were the needs of the students in the five self-contained classrooms and the social worker’s schedule. Students and families in crisis, administrative directives, and teacher requests were situations that arose that resulted in adjustments to my weekly calendars. Copies of my calendars were available for stakeholders to view in the school’s main office and a copy hung in my office as per school policy. The social worker, both administrators, and the special education teachers were provided a copy of my weekly calendar.

8. School Counseling Core Curriculum Action Plan and Lessons Plans:

Attached Files:Narrative:
During 2016-17, there was only one full-time counselor, assisted by the school social worker, to deliver counseling curriculum activities at Bruner Elementary. I decided what guidance lessons to provide each grade level after reviewing the school’s goals, AIMSWeb assessments, Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) scores, and data from Infinite Campus regarding behavior, grades, and attendance. I requested input from teachers on topics they believed needed to be addressed in their classrooms or grade level. Early in the school year, I took medical leave and, during my absence, the social worker provided classroom guidance lessons in grades 1-5. The topics for her lessons were based on teacher surveys and supported my counseling program goal of reducing the number of office discipline referrals. Upon my return, we discussed that I would start guidance lessons with the intermediate grade levels, while she finished her lessons with the primary grades.

Every year, I present classroom guidance lessons to all students in kindergarten through 5th grade. The Core Curriculum Action Plan shows students in each grade level participated in guidance lessons that built knowledge and skills from the academic, social/emotional and career domains. The lessons were aligned with the Mindsets and Behaviors that were a priority for my counseling program, such as, use of study skills, demonstrating effective coping skills, and having a positive attitude toward work and learning. The topics of study skills, coping strategies/problem solving, and school/work relationship were addressed in grades 1-5 with developmentally appropriate activities. These three main topics supported my counseling program goals of improving academics, behavior, and attendance. Students’ ability to perform these standards was evaluated by GPA, office discipline referrals, attendance reports, pre/posttests, and teacher/student surveys. Building a foundation for appropriate behavior towards others was the focus of my kindergarten guidance lessons. Guidance lessons addressing feelings, friends, and problem solving were preventative counseling activities designed to minimize office discipline referrals in the future. Pre-K students participated in individual counseling and school-wide counseling department activities, such as, the Be Kind and Sanford Harmony programs. Students from the self contained classrooms participated in the guidance lessons in general education classrooms as their IEP’s permitted.

The Sanford Harmony Program focuses on building healthy relationships among students and all students at Bruner participated in the program’s activities. The school’s Harmony team, which I led, strongly believed the program would help reduce the large number of unkind behaviors towards others. The team requested it be implemented school-wide with classroom teachers presenting the lessons in order to be more effective. The administration fully supported the implementation and mandated the curriculum be taught by every classroom teacher. I provided, with assistance from the team, trainings for the staff on how to implement the curriculum. I included the Harmony curriculum in my action plan because I actively influenced which lessons were taught based on data obtained from office discipline referrals.

My decision to provide coping skills activities helped address my three program goals and supported my program vision. The two coping skills lesson were taken from Survival Backpack: Coping Skills Guide for Elementary Students that was provided from the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department. These lessons have proven effective, in the past at Bruner, to help 3rd graders handle difficult situations. I decided to present the lessons in grades 3-5 due to student conflicts that had arisen in those grade levels. I wanted to include the coping skills lessons in my RAMP application because they played a significant role in the achievement of my counseling program’s behavior goal. Since the coping skills unit only had two lessons, I included the second study skills lesson from my study skills unit for my RAMP application because the lesson closely aligned with my counseling program goals. I selected and modified study skills lessons from STEP UP to Better Grades by Robin Zorn in order to help improve reading proficiency levels. Study skills lessons were presented in grades 1st-5th at the request of 1st and 2nd grade teachers who believed their students lacked those skills. As part of my comprehensive counseling program, career awareness lessons were presented in grades 1st-5th. The lessons centered on the education/career connection. The importance of postsecondary education and life-long learning were discussed in career awareness lessons and counseling program activities, as well as in College Awareness Day activities.

9. School Counseling Core Curriculum: Results Report:
The core curriculum results report analyzes two coping skills lessons and one study skills lesson. I chose the lessons to address two of my program goals. The lessons are linked to my counseling program’s vision and mission by helping students acquire knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to be become proficient students and responsible citizens that contribute positively in society.

113 third grade students participated in both coping skills lessons. Even though only 7% of the students reported knowing what good coping skills were on the pretest, 84% believed learning good coping skills would help them do better in school. These results led me to believe that the majority of the third graders wanted to be able to appropriately handle their problems in order to succeed in school. At the end of the coping skills unit, 77% of the third grade students reported knowing what good coping skills were and 91% believed knowing the skills would help them achieve in school. My counseling program goal was to reduce the number of office discipline referrals for this particular group of students by 25%. The outcome data revealed the number of referrals decreased by 50.6%. I believe the large decrease in referrals could be attributed to several factors; the coping skills unit, additional counseling services, the Harmony Program and technological changes in reporting behaviors. Due to the past success in helping third graders deal with life’s challenges, the lessons will continue to be taught. After reviewing the office discipline referrals for 2016-17, a third lesson will be added to the unit that addresses conflict resolution skills and ways to de-escalate. The students’ responses on the Clay vs Rock worksheet revealed a more in-depth explanation needs to be given on the two types of problems in order to help second language students understand the analogy better. In addition to these modifications, students who report they do not know what good coping skills are on the posttest will be invited to participate in a small group. Students with multiple office referrals will receive additional counseling services to help them utilize good strategies. After reviewing office discipline data, additional coping skills lessons will be incorporated into my counseling core curriculum for fourth and fifth grade.

116 fifth graders and 110 fourth graders participated in the study skills lesson. The lesson was the second lesson in a three lesson study skills unit. On the study skills pretest, 42% (5th) and 50% (4th) of the students’ total scores placed them in the excellent study habits category. An additional 42% (5th) and 39% (4th) of the students’ total scores placed them in the good study habits category. These results, along with data obtained from the 1st Quarter Progress Reports, led me to believe the students thought they had good study habits but in actuality, they did not know effective ways to study. The decline in the number of students in the good study habits category and an increase in the number of students in the improvement needed category on the posttests, supported my belief. A comparison of the study skills pre/posttest scores and 2nd semester reading grades revealed to me that students became aware of their ineffective study habits and made changes after the study skills lessons to become more proficient in reading. My counseling program goal was to reduce the number of fourth and fifth graders earning an F in reading by 70%. The outcome data revealed the percentage change was 91%. Due to the successful outcome, the lessons will continue to be taught to third graders with fourth and fifth graders receiving modified lessons that include organization and time management skills. In addition, the pre/posttest will be reformatted into the Plickers application and adjusted to reflect the new skills. Utilizing Plickers will allow for better data collection that can be shared with teachers sooner. The addition of skills and technology to the lesson will help me address more of the ASCA Learning Strategies standards.

The outcome data from both the coping skills and study skills units revealed students acquired the attitude, knowledge and skills necessary to succeed. Lessons from both units aligned well with ASCA Mindsets and behaviors. The 45 minute allotted time was appropriate to teach each lesson and answer student questions. The topic of each unit will be continued but lesson activities will be changed so as not to repeat the same lesson in every grade level.

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

Lesson #1
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Anger Management | Behavioral Issues | Conflict Resolution | Violence Prevention |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
3 Coping Skills #1 Behavior:SMS 7 & Behavior:SS 9
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
2/6/17-2/13/17 113 students
5 classrooms
45 minute
lesson
*On the coping skills pretest, 7% of the 3rd
graders knew what
coping skills were. 77% believed they could control all of their problems. 84% believed
coping skills would help
them do better in
school.
*Office discipline for the
current 3rd grade
students totaled 44. This
group had 89 referrals in
the previous year. The
percentage change was
50.6%. The 44 referrals
were for 20 students. 4
of the 20 made up 57%
of the 3rd grade
referrals.
*I expected a decrease in office discipline referrals but not this large. I speculate that
the lessons, additional
services provided by the social worker and myself, Sanford
Harmony Program, and the
change in submitting office referrals were all contributing
factors. Coping skills lessons will continue due to the positive results but the Clay vs Rock analogy will be modified to assist second language
students. Ways to resolve a conflict will be added to the unit and the pre/posttests.
Students who receive multiple office referrals will continue to participate in additional counseling activities. Data will continue to be collected to determine the effectiveness of
the lessons and track the progress of this particular group of students.

Attached Files:
Lesson #2
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Anger Management | Behavioral Issues | Conflict Resolution | Violence Prevention |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
3 Coping Skills #2 Mindset 6 & Behavior:SS 6 & 7
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
3/7/17-3/16/17 113 students
5 classrooms
45 minute
lesson
*On the coping skills posttest, 77% of the 3rd
graders knew what
coping skills were. 47%
believed they could control all of their problems. 91% believed
coping skills would help
them do better in
school.
*Office discipline for the current 3rd grade
students totaled 44. This
group had 89 referrals in
the previous year. The
percentage change was
50.6%. The 44 referrals
were for 20 students. 4
of the 20 made up 57%
of the 3rd grade
referrals.
*I expected a decrease in office discipline referrals but not this large. I speculate that
the lessons, additional
services provided by the social worker and myself, Sanford
Harmony Program, and the
change in submitting office referrals were all contributing
factors. Coping skills lessons will continue due to the positive results but the Clay vs
Rock analogy will be modified to assist second language
students. Ways to resolve a conflict will be added to the unit and the pre/posttests.
Students who receive multiple office referrals will continue to participate in additional counseling activities. Data will
continue to be collected to determine the effectiveness of
the lessons and track the progress of this particular group of students.

Attached Files:
Lesson #3
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Academic Achievement | Career Development | Postsecondary Preparation |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
4 & 5 Study Skills Mindset 5 & Behavior:LS 7 & Behavior:SS 1
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
11/14/16-12/7/16 *116 fifth grade students in
4 classrooms
*110 fourth grade students in
4 classrooms
*45 minute lesson
*On the Pretest, 42% of 5th graders and 50% of 4th graders rated themselves as having excellent study habits. Another 42% of 5th graders and 39% of 4th graders rated themselves as having good study habits.
*Of students participating in both Pre&Post tests, 48% (5th)& 41% (4th) improved study habit scores
33% (5th)& 44% (4th) declined in scores 19% (5th)& 15% (4th) remained the same
*27 fifth graders earned an F in Reading on their 1st Quarter progress report and only 3 earned it on their 2nd Semester report card.
*6 fourth graders earned an F in Reading on their 1st Quarter progress report and 0 earned it on their 2nd Semester report card.
*Percentage change for # of Fs in reading from 1st Qtr to 4th Qtr was 91%.
*5 fifth & 11 fourth graders achieved A/B Honor Roll in the 1st Quarter and 13 fifth & 26 fourth graders achieved it in the 4th Quarter.
*The outcome reveals the study skills lessons were effective in improving student grades. In the future, they will be taught to 3rd graders as the foundation lessons, while 4th and 5th graders will receive expanded study skills lessons to better prepare them for middle school. Time management and organizational skills will be added (B: LS 3). The pre/posttests will be amended to address the new topics. Apps like Plickers will be utilized to assist with data collection. Due to the uncertainty of why students’ total study skills scores decreased, a follow-up question will be asked of the students.

Attached Files:
Are the 3 lessons submitted part of the same unit? No

10. Small-Group Responsive Services:
The 2016-17 small group action plan shows the six groups that Bruner students participated in. During my medical leave early in the school year, the school social worker facilitated four small groups that focused on teaching selected students more appropriate behaviors. Students participating in the self-control, making good choices, and social skills groups were referred by teachers and/or chosen due to their office discipline referrals. The group topics, which supported my counseling program goal to reduce office discipline referrals, were based on student needs and a teacher survey. The social worker collected her own data and shared her results with administration.

The remaining two groups on the action plan were designed to build leadership skills and self-confidence in selected 4th and 5th grade students. After reviewing Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) scores and collaborating with teachers, I became aware of several students who scored at the highest levels in reading but were not referred for the Gifted and Talented Program, were not engaging in more challenging coursework, and had not been referred to Bruner’s chapter of National Elementary Honor Society. Teachers also reported these students were quiet and did not volunteer to participate often. This information, along with my program vision of every student achieving their full potential, provided the foundation for the two leadership groups. The advisory council assisted with the selection of group members because they were familiar with the students and knew which students would benefit the most. I met with the selected students to assess their enthusiasm for participation and obtained parent permission. Based on teacher requests, I scheduled group sessions on Friday afternoons during each grade level’s RTI block of time.

I selected The 7 Habits of Happy Kids as the curriculum base for the leadership groups after reviewing my notes from a Leader in Me in-service I attended in 2015-16. The teachings of the habits, such as; setting goals, working well with others, balancing life, listening to others, and being responsible for actions, aligned well with ASCA’s Mindsets and Behaviors. Mindset 1, 2 and 5, along with Learning Strategy 7 and Social Skills 7, served as the basis while designing the lesson plans. I wrote the pre/posttest leadership questions to assess group members’ knowledge, attitude, and skills related to the 7 Habits and ASCA’s Mindsets/Behaviors.

The outcome and perception data revealed the 4th grade leadership group was effective in building leadership skills and self-confidence in group members. On the Leadership Group Posttest, 100% of group members rated themselves a 5 (highest) on the question “I know I can achieve success by using my abilities to the fullest”. All group members increased their reading grade by at least 3 percentage points from their 1st semester report card to their 2nd semester report card. Four of the group members applied for National Elementary Honor Society membership and were inducted. One group member was elected Honor Society president for 2017-18 and another was elected secretary. The fifth group member did not apply to Honor Society for he knew he would be transferring schools.

In the future, I will schedule the leadership group during the 1st semester when less school-wide activities are planned. The large number of school-wide activities during the 2nd semester of 2016-17 impacted the frequency of group meetings. Meeting with group members weekly during the 1st semester will help students gain the confidence needed to achieve their goals earlier in the school year and will allow for additional leadership groups to be scheduled based on student needs. Group sessions will continue to take place during RTI time so students do not miss core instruction, but a different day of the week will be chosen to avoid conflicts with school activities. I will continue to walk group members to/from their classrooms to allow for extra discussion time. An additional two sessions will be added, one for more rapport building prior to the lessons beginning and the other for more sharing of experiences after the lessons are completed. Homework assignments will be adjusted to provide me a more measureable activity to assess group members’ understanding of the topics. In addition to the leadership group, other small groups will be offered in the future based on student needs. After reviewing school data, the social worker and I will decide which students and topics to include, and who will facilitate each group.


Attached Files:

Small-Group Results Report

Group Name: 4th Grade Leadership Group
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Academic Achievement | Character Education | Group Counseling |
Goal: By June 2017, the number of group members who earned a reading score of 90% or below will decrease by 75% from 4 (1st quarter progress report) to 1 (2nd semester report card).
Target Group: 4th graders who scored a 3 or 4 in reading (SBAC) but were not referred for GATE or Honor Society
Data Used to Identify Students: Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) scores and school data
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Outline of Group Sessions Delivered
Pelto Mindsets 1, 2 & 5
B:LS 1, 7 & 9
B:SMS 1, 2, 4 & 5
B:SS 1, 2, 5, 6 & 7
Leadership Group Outline

Group Goal: By June 2017, the number of group members who earned a reading score of 90% or below will decrease by 75% from 4 (1st quarter progress report) to 1 (2nd semester report card).

Session #1
Group Introduction and Be Proactive – You’re in Charge
Leadership Group Pretest
Group Rules form
Bored, Bored, Bored from The 7 Habits of Happy Kids
I Am Proactive Worksheet
Be Proactive: Be in Charge Interactive Power Point

Session #2
Begin with the End in Mind – Have a Plan
Goal Setting: Step by Step Worksheet

Session #3
Put First Things First – Work First, Then Play
First Things First Interactive Power Point
Pokey and the Spelling Test from The 7 Habits of Happy
Kids
First Things First Worksheet

Session #4
Think Win Win – Everyone Can Win
Win Win Solutions Interactive Power Point
Win Win Solutions Worksheet

Session #5
Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood
Seek to Understand Interactive Power Point

Session #6
Synergize – Together is Better
Working Together Interactive Power Point
I Remember, We Remember from Still More Activities That
Teach
Synergize Activity - List of Items

Session #7
Sharpen the Saw – Balance Feels Best
Balance Your Life Power Point
Balance Your Life Worksheet
Leadership Group Posttest
The 7 Habits of Happy Kids mini posters
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
*5 fourth graders
* 7 sessions
*30-40 minute sessions
*On the Posttest, 100% of group members rated themselves a 5 (highest) on the question “I know I can achieve success by using my abilities to the fullest”. (40% on Pretest)
*On the Posttest, 100% of group members knew they “must live a balanced life to be happy.” (60% on Pretest)
*
*All group members increased their reading grade by at least 3 percentage points from their 1st semester report card to their 2nd semester report card.
*3 of the 5 group members increased their GPA by at least .1 from their 1st semester report card to their 2nd semester report card.
*4 of the 5 group members applied for National Elementary Honor Society (NEHS) and were inducted.
*60% of group members performed at the same achievement level on the SBAC Reading Assessment between 3rd and 4th grade. 40% declined.
The outcome data reveals the small group activities were effective in building leadership skills and self-confidence in group members. In the future, a leadership group will be offered during both semesters to include more students. Two additional sessions will be added to allow for more sharing time among members. The pre/post test will be adjusted to reflect a better balanced measure of attitudes, knowledge and skills learned. Homework assignments will also be adjusted to provide a more measurable activity for group members to perform in between each session. Group sessions will continue to take place during RTI time but a different day of the week will be chosen for better constancy.

11. Closing-the-Gap Results Report:
Goal: By June 2017, the number of African American students with 10 or more unexcused absences will decrease by 50% from 13 during the 1st semester to 6 during the 2nd semester.
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Academic Achievement | Behavioral Issues | Attendance |
Target Group: African American students with 10+ unexcused absences during 1st semester
Data Used to Identify Students: Infinite Campus Attendance Reports and DataLab
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Type of Activities to be Delivered in What Manner?
Pelto Mindset 1, 2 & 6 B:LS 4 & 7 B:SMS 4, 5, 6 & 7 Truancy letters, Parent conferences, Individual sessions with counselor and/or social worker, Community referrals, Classroom guidance lessons
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
13 African American students
2- K students
2 – 1st graders
1 – 2nd grader
3 – 3rd graders
2 – 4th graders
3 – 5th graders
*62% of CTG students stated their parents wake them up in the morning and 30% stated a different family member woke them up.
*77% of CTG students believed their absenteeism was due to “other” reasons, 54% believed due to illness, and 23% believed due to oversleeping.
*Examples of “other” reasons given were:
Playing video games at cousin’s house, taking a week off for birthday, parent mad at school, change in custody by Depart. of Family Services
*7 CTG students achieved the goal of having 10 or less unexcused absences in the 2nd semester
*8 CTG students improved their attendance during the 2nd semester
*31% of CTG students improved their GPA from S1 to S2
*8% of CTG students improved their reading grade from S1 to S2
*62% of CTG students had a larger number of office discipline referrals during the 2nd semester
Data results showed the majority of the CTG students improved their attendance but not their academics or behavior. Small attendance groups addressing coping skills, goal setting and social skills will be created to help students overcome barriers to learning. Referrals to community agencies will continue along with working w/social worker to meet student needs. Student contracts, weekly check-ins and school-wide incentives will be added to the attendance interventions due to their prior success. Perception data surveys will be rewritten after collaboration w/stakeholders.

Attached Files:Attendance reports in Infinite Campus at the end of the first semester (2016-17) revealed nineteen students were at-risk for retention due to absences. Thirteen of the nineteen students were African American, five were Hispanic and one was Asian. At Bruner and throughout the school district, African Americans have the lowest Average Daily Attendance (ADA) rate. AiMSWeb data revealed six of the thirteen African American students scored below average or well below average reading level on the Fall Benchmark. Based on these pieces of data, I chose to improve the attendance of the thirteen students which would lead to the improvement of their reading skills as my closing the gap (CTG) goal. Attendance Works research shows increasing student attendance is vital for improving achievement. My CTG goal aligned with the school’s goal to “reduce the percentage point gap between proficiency of highest and lowest scoring subgroups in math and reading.”

In the beginning of the 2016-17 school year, the school social worker and I discussed sharing the same goal of improving the attendance of habitually absent students. We planned for both of us to review attendance reports and she would perform home visits addressing the family’s needs while I individually worked with the students at school. The home visits were planned to help address the comfort levels of parents with the school. A 2015-16 district survey on parent perception of school performance revealed five of the eight questions had a majority of negative responses for Bruner. The day prior to the first home visit, the school district stated social workers could not visit homes for safety reasons, and our social worker was not granted rights to run attendance reports. Knowing research showed parent involvement was the key to improving student attendance, the plan was adjusted for the social worker to meet with parents in her school office. Based on individual student needs, our interventions consisted of individual counseling, community referrals, parent conferences, and reporting educational neglect.

End of year attendance records revealed eight of the thirteen CTG students decreased their number of unexcused absences during the 2nd semester and four students improved their overall GPA. 8% of the CTG students improved their reading grade from 1st semester to 2nd semester, while 15% declined. Eight of the students were able to maintain their passing grade. For the entire student body, 16% of students improved their reading grade while another 16% declined. Behavior data revealed eight of the thirteen students received more office discipline referrals during the 2nd semester with the majority occurring the last month of school. Five of these eight students were related and involved in bullying another student. These five students were on track to meet their attendance goals, however, the consequential discipline for bullying and parental actions taken afterwards impacted their attainment.

Based on the results, I will implement the following changes to improve the impact of these interventions; student contracts, weekly check-ins, monthly parent letters, attendance guidance lessons, and school-wide incentives. These interventions were not utilized in 2016-17 due to the focus on direct parent involvement, which was one of the administration’s goals, and my medical leave. Small attendance groups addressing coping skills, goal setting, and social skills will be created to help students overcome barriers to learning. I will implement the additional interventions immediately next school year with the returning at-risk students to ensure their academic improvement.

The student survey used to assess the CTG students’ perception of their attendance was not reflective of all questions asked. Based on their responses, I asked additional individualized questions, such as, information about their home situation, personal safety, and personal goals. Because of my individualized questions, the perception data collected was limited. I will collaborate with my advisory council and other school counselors to create a better attendance measurement that focuses on selected Mindsets and Behaviors. Of the data collected, 77% of the students believed their absenteeism was due to “other” reasons. These reasons included a change in custody, playing video games, and taking a week off for a birthday. The survey data collected was shared with necessary stakeholders to help students overcome their challenges to academic success.

12. Program Evaluation Reflection:Following the ASCA National Model has transformed my comprehensive school counseling program. It has been my goal to provide an exemplary program that benefits every student. Through the utilization of leadership, advocacy and collaboration, I have made a positive impact on student achievement, attendance, and behavior. Implementing ASCA’s themes into my counseling program produced effective systemic change at Bruner Elementary.

Leadership
In 2014, Bruner Elementary was the first elementary school in the Clark County School District (CCSD) to earn the RAMP Award. This special recognition has not only provided me leadership opportunities within my school, but within the school district as well. In order to inspire more counselors to provide a data driven comprehensive counseling program, the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department requested my involvement in professional development for school counselors on the National Model. During RAMP Academy provided by the Guidance and Counseling Department, I walked elementary and secondary school counselors through the twelve components of the RAMP application. I assisted elementary and middle school counselors with their Curriculum Action Plan, Curriculum Results Report, and Small Group Results Report during an open computer lab session. During National Model trainings provided by ASCA trainers, I answered counselors’ questions pertaining to RAMP and the school district. I conducted personal sessions for elementary school counselors requesting assistance with their National Model training assignments.

During 2016-17, I was a member of the Leadership Cadre for the Guidance and Counseling Department. The Cadre shared relevant information, provided counseling in-services and served as a liaison between the district’s 214 elementary school counselors and the Guidance and Counseling Department. In February, the Cadre presented as a team to elementary and secondary school counselors “Effective Counseling in the Classroom.” I presented on the types and purpose of data, along with analyzing data. 83% of the attendees believed the information presented was clear and effectively presented, while 81% believed the content of the training provided information on how to use data to analyze impact of lesson plans. In May, I hosted one of the Cadre’s Elementary Counselor Trainings and presented on technological tools for collecting data. I demonstrated how to use the Plickers application for collecting pre/posttest data and shared data results I obtained through use of the application with students. (The Plickers app collects real time formative assessment data without the need for student devices.)

I have found pleasure in participating in the movement to bring CCSD counseling programs closer in alignment with the ASCA National Model through professional development and will continue to assist other school counselors with their alignment. In order to strengthen my own counseling program, I have completed ASCA’s Legal and Ethical Specialist, School Counselor Data Specialist, and School Counselor Leadership Specialist online courses. I have obtained knowledge from these courses that I will utilize to maintain my leadership role within my school and the district.

Advocacy
I have been able to advocate for students by reviewing attendance and behavior data, examining quarterly grades, and comparing SBAC and AiMSWeb scores. Data from these sources have allowed for me to advocate for the inclusion of students in National Honor Society, tutoring, and Special Education Services. Since becoming a RAMP school, I research programs that are supported by data to incorporate into my counseling program. At the end of the 2015-16 school year, the administration requested the social worker and I investigate programs to implement school-wide to address the unkind behaviors committed by students. The Sanford Harmony Program’s data demonstrated its effectiveness with the types of unkind behaviors Bruner students were receiving office discipline referrals for. This data, along with the school’s behavior data, provided me with the tools needed to advocate for the implementation of the Sanford Harmony program school-wide. Behavior data revealed the number of office discipline referrals declined from 463 (2015-16) to 281 (2016-17). My advocating for students through the implementation of the Sanford Harmony Program proved beneficial.

Analyzing academic data revealed eight high performing students who were not having all of their educational needs met. I created the Leadership Group, as mentioned earlier in this application, to address this concern. The goal of the small group was to increase the GPA of the eight students and build their leadership skills. For some staff members, this goal did not align with the school’s goal to reduce the gap between proficient and non-proficient students. My program mission pushed me to create the Leadership Group and provide counseling activities to assist these high performing students achieve their full potential. End of year results showed that group members not only improved their academics, but developed confidence needed to run for National Honor Society office positions, enter and win 3rd place in a state sponsored art contest, and give a speech during We the People Mock Trials. The success of these eight students significantly impacted my confidence to continue to advocate for every student no matter their proficiency level.

Collaboration
As a result of becoming a RAMP school, I often seek the opinions, recommendations, and data of other stakeholders. I switched from thinking I know what counseling program activities are best to making decisions based on a team approach. Improving attendance, behavior, and academics cannot be accomplished by me alone. I collaborate with teachers, administration, parents, students, community partners, and other school counselors about my counseling program plans and student needs. The input I receive is incorporated into my counseling program activities. Utilizing the Plickers application this past year to collect and analyze pre/posttest data more efficiently was the result of collaboration with 5th grade teachers and other elementary school counselors. Collaboration with classroom teachers, administration and Sanford Harmony team contributed to the success of one of my program goals.

In the beginning of 2015-16, my administration applied for a social worker grant utilizing some of my counseling program data. Bruner received its first full time social worker in the spring of 2015, and collaboration between her and I began immediately. As described previously in this application, the social worker and I discussed such things as; students, schedules, guidance lessons, and goals on a regular basis. Our collaboration allowed for counseling program activities like small groups to continue while I was out on medical leave. In the spring of 2017, the administration requested the social worker, school psychologist, and I create procedures and activities designed to help students de-escalate safely. The three of us worked together to create a proposal for a ‘turnaround room’ designed to assist students with their social/emotional needs before de-escalation steps are needed. Our collaboration on the purpose, goals, and design of the room resulted in Bruner receiving another grant funded social worker in the fall of 2017 to facilitate the ‘turnaround room.’ The school psychologist, two social workers, and I schedule weekly collaboration meetings and no longer function as single entity departments within the school.

Systemic Change
Creating a systemic change has taken some time. Prior to becoming a RAMP school, my counseling program activities were planned based on engaging activities that I enjoyed providing. Data from my previous RAMP application revealed that the guidance lessons I thought students would remember the most were not the lessons that resulted in student growth or achievement. Now, my program activities are planned with effectiveness in mind and how to measure it. My counseling program has evolved because I have changed from being reluctant to collect data to embracing it in all aspects of my program. I examine school data monthly and plan guidance lessons and other program activities based on the results. I share with teachers new data collecting technology tools to expedite their progress monitoring of students. I cite school data in staff and committee meetings as a way to demonstrate support for school programs. I request to review pre/posttest data the social worker has collected to ensure we are meeting the needs of every student. My enthusiasm for data has not only begun to influence other school counselors, but other Bruner staff members as well. The new social worker has requested my assistance in collecting data for the ‘turnaround room.’ A fifth grade teacher utilized Plickers to obtain information on her students’ academic progress. The assistant principal has incorporated my counseling program data to obtain grants for funding school-wide social/emotional programs. Data has been the energy driving me to serve as a leader within my school and the district, to advocate for every student, and to collaborate with all stakeholders to ensure every student succeeds.

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13. ReRamp Narrative:
The impact of my data driven comprehensive school counseling program on Bruner’s students and staff has been positive. The transformation continues to take place as I regularly examine the school’s data and plan my counseling program activities based on the results. Prior to receiving the RAMP Award in 2014, I eagerly aligned my program with the ASCA National Model as the district’s Guidance and Counseling Department had urged. Since my knowledge on the ASCA Model was limited, the two counselors at a local middle school (Burkholder), staff from the Guidance and Counseling Department and I would meet to discuss the Model and the RAMP process. The Burkholder counselors and I were willing to be ASCA pioneers for the Clark County School District (CCSD). Both schools received the RAMP Award which gave us and the Guidance and Counseling Department the platform needed to seriously discuss the applicability of the ASCA Model with the 214 elementary school counselors and the 450 secondary level counselors. Beginning in the 2015-16 school year, the Guidance and Counseling Department provided all CCSD school counselors trainings on the National Model which were presented by ASCA trainers. During that same year, representatives from each school district in Nevada began conferencing to create an annual school counselor evaluation for all Nevada school counselors. The counselor evaluation is based on the ASCA Model and administrators will learn about the ASCA Model and the evaluation rubric in the 2017-18 school year, with full implementation of the evaluation taking place in 2018-19. I feel great pleasure knowing that my data driven comprehensive school counseling program has played a part in moving CCSD’s school counselors forward in their alignment with the ASCA National Model. Playing a part in this movement has been valuable in showing Bruner’s stakeholders that my school counseling program has made a difference in the lives of our students.
The student population at Bruner Elementary is diverse with the majority of students performing below the proficiency level in reading and math. The goals of the school has been to improve reading proficiency levels, decrease the achievement gap between the highest performing subgroup and the lowest performing, and to increase the staff’s knowledge and skills related to cultural competency to meet the needs of diverse students. The school’s goals, along with academic, attendance, and behavior data, provided me with an invaluable launching point to improve my school counseling program and positively impact every student. In the 2015-16 school year, the Clark County School District exchanged its student information system for Infinite Campus. Valuable student data from previous years, such as, attendance, test scores, special education information, and report cards were no longer accessible to schools through the new system. This, along with CCSD’s switch from the CRT student assessment to the SBAC, limited viable data that I could examine and compare from year to year. Bruner’s administration, which was reluctant to inputting all behavior referrals into the new student information system, continued to allow teachers to refer students to the office for discipline in the paper pencil format. This paper pencil format allowed me to continue collecting behavioral data with validity.
The data I have collected on office discipline referrals for the past several years brought about change for my school counseling program and had a positive impact on the students. During the 2012-13 school year, the number of office discipline referrals increased to over 300. This increase was a result of losing two third grade teachers. One of the third grade teachers dead suddenly and then her replacement was later surplused from Bruner by the district. The emotional stress level of the students and staff played a significant role in the increase of office discipline referrals. One of my counseling program goals in my 2014 RAMP application, addressed this increase. I achieved my goal of reducing the number of referrals by teaching coping skills during classroom guidance lessons, small counseling groups, and staff meetings. In the 2014-15 school year, the number of office referrals again exceeded 300. Data revealed the first grade students committed 41% of the offenses referred to the office. Despite teaching conflict resolution strategies and coping skills to all grade levels, the number of office referrals spiked to over 400 in 2015-16. An analysis of the data revealed a small number of students had multiple referrals each school year, but the reason for the spike could not be attributed to any specific event or situation. Use of time assessments revealed I was spending the majority of my time providing responsive services addressing the social/emotional needs of students. Knowing advocacy was one of the ASCA Model Themes, I began to advocate for a system change by discussing the results of the time assessments and behavior data with administration and staff. My advocacy resulted in the administration utilizing my data to apply for a grant funded social worker position. Having data on the types of incidents, location of their occurrence, and who was being referred to the office for discipline benefitted the school as a whole. In the spring of 2016, Bruner was one of the first schools in the Clark County School District to receive a licensed social worker funded by the state legislature. My advocacy and behavior data also helped to convince administration to implement the Sanford Harmony Program in the fall of 2016.
The outcome data for 2016-17 revealed the total number of office discipline referrals decreased by 39.3% from the previous year. The large decrease in office referrals can be attributed to the joint effort of the school social worker and I to address the needs of the students, and to the implementation of the Sanford Harmony Program. I believe having each classroom teacher incorporate social/emotional curriculum from the Sanford Harmony Program into their daily activities proved more effective in reducing the number of office discipline referrals than just the social worker and I providing classroom guidance lessons once a month. Classroom teachers were able to help their students resolve conflicts in the classroom through the ‘Meet Up’ activity which is an everyday practice. During the ‘Meet Up’ activity, students meet in a circle to greet one another, share ideas, celebrate friendships, solve problems, and engage in team building activities. The number of office referral incidents occurring in the classroom decreased by 41.4% in 2016-17. A team approach between school counselor, social worker, and classroom teachers to address the social/emotional needs of the students proved most beneficial. I do not believe I would have been able to achieve my counseling program goal of reducing the number of office discipline referrals for third graders if it wasn’t for the team approach.
The biggest change to my counseling program since receiving the RAMP Award is that I am now a part of a team that works to meet the needs of the students. The team consists of the school psychologist, two full time social workers, and me. Functioning as a team will allow me to spend more time addressing the academic and career domains. In my previous RAMP application, I stated I was not able to adequately address the career domain with students due to the amount of time I was spending in responsive services. Not providing as many career and college activities was a choice I made due to the large school counselor to student ratio at the time. I have made it a priority to incorporate career and college activities into my classroom guidance lessons ever since. Now, as a member of a team, I am eager to devote more time to career and college activities with the students.
After sharing my counseling program behavior outcome data with stakeholders, my administration has decided to continue utilizing the Sanford Harmony and Be Kind Programs school-wide. Dates on the 2017-18 school calendar have already been reserved for the Harmony Team to provide further professional development for the staff on the program. Both programs will become components of the Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) approach per the administration. PBIS provides prevention oriented and researched based interventions designed to improve the behavior and academics of students. Bruner’s PBIS motto will be; Be Kind, Be Respectful, Be Responsible, and Be Safe. Although it has taken time for the social/emotional needs of the students to be addressed school-wide, the system change that was sparked by office discipline referral data has been exciting.
When I first received RAMP, the Guidance and Counseling Department asked me to share with the 214 elementary school counselors how the RAMP process impacted my school counseling program. My response was that I changed the type of classroom guidance lessons I provided. By utilizing data, I learned that the classroom guidance lessons I Ioved to teach were not the lessons producing positive results for the students. Now, after a few years of immersing myself in the school’s data and having written my second RAMP application, I would respond differently to that question. I would start by asking the counselors if their students and their school have been positively impacted because of their school counseling program. And, if so, what data do they have to prove it. I would share how the RAMP process allowed me the opportunity to truly evaluate my school counseling program and bring about school-wide changes. All staff members and students are now actively addressing the social/emotional domain daily. I know Bruner students and the school itself have been positively impacted because of the school counseling program and I have the data to prove it.


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