print   go back

RAMP Application

School Information

Our school has received the RAMP designation previously and is applying to Re-Ramp: No
Have you or another counselor(s) in your school received formal, in person training or coaching on the ASCA National Model or RAMP in the past two years?:
Does your school receive funds from the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program?: No
School Name: Henry H. Filer Middle School
School Address: 531 West 29 Street Hialeah, 33012
School District Name: Miami Dade County Public Schools
School Twitter Handle: @FilerHenry
School year RAMP application represents: 2016-2017
Number of students in district: 356,086
Grade Category: m
Grade levels served at school: 6, 7, 8
Number of students at school: 774
Number of certified staff at school: 42
Number of Full-time school counselors at school: 1
Number of Part-time school counselors at school: 0
Average number of students served by each school counselor: 774
School setting: Urban
Percentage of students identified as special education students: 7.9
Percentage of students who receive free or reduced lunch: 93

Percent Black: 2.1
Percent Hispanic: 96
Percent White: 1.7
Percent Native American: 0
Percent Asian: 0
Percent Other: 0.1

Names of other school counselors at school:


Names of other personnel:


Written Portions and File Attachments

1. Vision Statement
School Counseling Program Vision Statement:
The vision of our school counseling program at Henry H. Filer Middle School is that all students possess the knowledge and college and career readiness skills necessary to meet the challenges of an ever-changing, technology-driven, 21st-century global community. Our students persevere as confident life-long learners and leaders that are considerate, appreciate cultural diversity, demonstrate cultural sensitivity, and who implement problem-solving and critical thinking skills needed to create a positive school and community culture that ensures equity and access for all learners. They demonstrate mastery of crucial academic, career and social/emotional skills which ensure they achieve their fullest potential. Through the collaborative efforts of our key stakeholders, all of our learners participate in a rigorous, high-quality academic, career and social/emotional curriculum that promotes success and help students reach their fullest potential.

School Counseling Program Beliefs:
• All students can be successful by developing their skills to their fullest potential.
• All students deserve to be treated with dignity and respect so that they may build their
self-confidence and ability to accept and be accepted in a culturally diverse society.
• All students should have equal access to a high-quality education which equitably supports
life-long learning and decision-making skills in the academic, social/emotional, and
college/career readiness domains.
• All students can become productive citizens in a global and 21st century technologically
driven society.
• School counselors will advocate for all students.


School Vision Statement:
Henry H. Filer Middle School prepares students to reach their maximum potential. The school’s educational community and stakeholders are dedicated to educating students so that they become lifelong learners in a complex and competitive society. We will continue to enrich the community through the development of the academic program and enhancement of technology, with emphasis on character education, so that students become productive citizens.

District Vision Statement:
We provide a world class education for every student.

Narrative: As our District shifted to providing our students access to a 21st-century learning environment where student outcomes are successfully achieved, we knew that the needs of our students were changing. In both theory and practice, every student in our district receives a high-quality 21st-century educational experience. This sentiment of equity and access is also reflected in our district’s School Counseling Department vision statement that includes focus on academic, social/emotional, and college and career readiness. The program structure supports educational reform initiatives and takes into consideration current social climate and the unique issues such as homelessness, bullying, cyberbullying, HIV/AIDS education, and health and wellness.

Accordingly, our school’s vision statement, developed by our school leadership team, also reflects the sentiment of the district’s vision and encompasses the focus of providing high-quality educational programs to address the unique needs of our student population as we prepare them to meet the challenges of an ever-changing, technology-driven, 21st century global community. However, an evaluation of our comprehensive school counseling department brought to the forefront that we were missing our own vision statement. This provided opportunity for our school counseling team, school leadership team, principal, School Counseling Advisory Council and school stakeholders to begin conversation and pursue the development of our vision statement.

The process of developing our vision statement began at our first department meeting of the school year with our principal who made sure to emphasize the importance of collaborative work. Next, we began holding meetings that included discussions first amongst ourselves then with our school leadership team, teachers, students, parents, and principal. The key points of these conversations which influenced the framework for our vision statement focused on student achievement, perseverance, acceptance, and value of cultural diversity, problem-solving, critical thinking skills, college and career readiness, and a need for life-long learning. Furthermore, we talked about the importance of providing equity and equal access to quality education to all our students to meet students’ academic, social/emotional, college and career readiness needs and promote learner success. Our efforts culminated into the following set of counseling beliefs.

As school counselors, we believe:
• All students can be successful by developing their skills to their fullest potential.
• All students deserve to be treated with dignity and respect so that they may build their
self-confidence and ability to accept and be accepted in a culturally diverse society.
• All students should have equal access to a high-quality education which equitably supports
life-long learning and decision-making skills in the academic, social/emotional, and
college/career readiness domains.
• All students can become productive citizens in a global and 21st century technologically
driven society.
• School counselors will advocate for all students.

We scheduled our next department meeting for the sole purpose of developing our vision statement. To begin, we reviewed the District’s and the District’s School Counseling vision statements to ensure that our vision statement echoed the same ideas. We agreed that we wanted our beliefs to influence our vision statement that all students possess the knowledge and college and career readiness skills necessary to meet the challenges of an ever-changing, technology-driven, 21st century global community and persevere as confident life-long learners and leaders that are considerate, appreciate cultural diversity, demonstrate cultural sensitivity, and who implement problem solving and critical thinking skills needed to create a positive school and community culture that ensures equity and access for all learners. Moreover, the vision statement was developed by placing these beliefs in an order that aligned with how we planned to support the varied needs of students. For example, students in grades 6-8 received core curriculum as it reflects how to prepare students for the 21st century.

In October 2015, we held a discussion at our School Counseling Advisory Board meeting where we presented our vision statement. This collaboration allowed us the opportunity to listen to feedback and make adjustments based on their recommendations. One recommendation was to add the phrase “collaborative efforts of our key stakeholders” since from the beginning of this journey we included all stakeholders in the school community. Our principal provided final approval for the vision statement and its use to drive our work as school counselors.

As the only school counselor left at the school, this vision statement is the driving force of my desired outcomes for every student. This vision statement motivates me to ensure students receive a comprehensive school counseling program that provides them the necessary support to access an academically enriched school community to impact present day and future success.

Attached Files:
2. Mission Statement:
School Mission Statement: Henry H. Filer Middle School enriches the community through a multicultural education experience. This sets the groundwork for high school and prepares students to become productive members of the workforce and of society in an advanced technological age. The school addresses the needs of the whole individual, and the school provides a center for community activities.

School Counseling Mission Statement: The mission of Henry H. Filer Middle School’s Comprehensive School Counseling Program is to support all students to reach their maximum potential through high academic achievement, social/emotional growth, and health and wellness. By doing so, all students will be college and career ready, and world-class citizens in a multicultural 21st century technology-driven global society. Our comprehensive school counseling program promotes equity, access and success for all students and engages them to pursue academic rigor and resiliency by identifying and addressing barriers allowing students to become life-long learners. In partnership with administrators, teachers, parents, and community members, the school counselors advocate to provide a safe environment which inspires a culture of acceptance and cultural sensitivity.

Narrative:
To begin the development of the mission statement, we attended a Race To The Top-District workshop that focused on the role of the 21st-century counselor. Attending this workshop, brought to the forefront a new inspiration of our roles in school and it redefined our motivation to provide a comprehensive school counseling program driven by the ASCA national model. Upon returning to school, we met to work collaboratively on the development of the mission statement. We agreed that significant changes were necessary to convey the intent and purpose of our counseling program and to provide the necessary focus to achieve our newly developed vision statement. We needed to ensure that our mission statement resonated with the ideals of student equity, access and academic success that are integral components of our counseling program beliefs. With a school population of 96% Latino, it was imperative that our mission statement reflected our growth mindset that all students can achieve and should receive equitable support for their academic, social-emotional, and college and career growth regardless of their ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status. The plan to reach this outcome was to provide professional support to our students in the form of individual counseling, small group counseling, core curriculum lessons, academic advisement and large group/classroom presentations that reflect the vision statement and target the social-emotional, and academic needs of all students as presented in the ASCA national model.

With that said, we revisited the definition of equity and concluded that equity consists of using extra and different measures to bring about the condition of same status-the state of equality. It means doing whatever it takes to get everyone to the same place, not just treating everyone the same. Once, we had a clear understanding of equity, we met with our principal to discuss our definition. She concluded that we were on target with our understanding of equity and access and asked us to reflect on how we would use our program to address the future goals of our students. This reflection afforded us the opportunity to brainstorm language to include in our mission statement. We understood that we wanted students to experience success in the present as they prepared for the long-term goal of becoming productive, life-long learners in a multicultural 21st-century technology-driven global society. Also, we wanted to ensure our new mission would provide a clear focus for our department and provide specific language on how we support our school’s overall mission. We began writing and after many drafts and discussions with the school leadership team, students, parents, and community stakeholders we finalized our mission statement. We used phrases such as “maximum potential”, and “high academic achievement” to ensure that our statement mirrored the focus of our school’s mission statement. Additionally, we used other phrases that as student advocates we want our students to achieve. These phrases included “life-long learners”, “productive citizens”, and “world-class citizens in a multicultural 21st-century technology-driven global society”.

Next, we presented the mission statement at our October 2015 School Advisory Council meeting and engaged in conversation about the ideas regarding our commitment and purpose as counselors implementing a school counseling program. We addressed the important components of the mission statement. Additionally, we talked about the roles of the school counselors on providing a student-oriented, data-driven program that targets all three learning domains which was the basis of our mission statement. We further stated, that our partnership with administrators, teachers, parents, and community provided the opportunity to advocate for students to have a safe environment which inspires a culture of acceptance and cultural sensitivity. Finally, this meeting allowed us to reaffirm our department’s role within the total school community. All in attendance approved the mission statement. Today, our mission statement serves as a powerful foundational and motivational element in my efforts to impact student achievement and success for all students.

Attached Files:
3. School Counseling Program Goals:

Goal 1:
By June 2017, the number of 6th-8th grade students identified by the Early Warning Systems (EWS) list (*432 students) will increase passing rate in English Language Arts and/or Mathematics by 5 percentage points from 82% baseline [354 passing/432 students] to a minimum of 86.1% [376 passing/432 students]. *432 students are due to 9 EWS students enrolling over the school year.

  • Academic Achievement
Goal 2:
By June 2017, the total number of 6th-8th grade students who accrued 10 or more absences will decrease by 5 percentage points from 34% (313 students- based on initial 2015-2016 enrollment of 921) to 32.3% (225 students based on initial 2016-2017 enrollment of 774).

  • Attendance
Goal 3:
By June 2017, the total number of indoor suspensions for all 6th-8th grade students will decrease by 5 percentage points from 12% (111 students- based on 2015-2016 enrollment of 921) to 11.4% (88 students- based on initial 2016-2017 enrollment of 774).

  • Behavioral Issues

Narrative:
Program goal development begins every summer at Henry H. Filer Middle School as staff take a deep dive into the school data to identify strengths and areas of improvement to develop goals that will enhance learning for the upcoming school year. For me, the data review affords me the opportunity to have conversations with my Administration, target areas for intervention and develop program goals that address issues of academic inequality for struggling subsets of students found in our school data.

From August until September of 2016, I drafted goals utilizing the data and SMART Goals worksheets provided by the ASCA National Model. My efforts yielded discussion with the Administration, teachers, and community stakeholders on student needs as found in the school data along with the best methods of tracking intervention effectiveness given our school population. Our Early Warning System (EWS) data which combines ELA and Math passing rates and the District’s Attendance, Movement, Mobility, and Suspensions data provided the foundation for the discussion and the three goals. The data indicated that 34% of our students had 10 or more unexcused absences in the 2015-2016 school year and 12% of our students were placed in indoor suspension. As a school counselor, I knew that these two issues (attendance and suspensions) negatively impacted student achievement because of the valuable instructional time missed by students. With such a significant percentage of students identified as At-Risk on the EWS, I developed Goal 1 to support these struggling students and to decrease the inequalities that existed between them and their non EWS peers at our school. My belief is that these inequalities could be diminished by increasing student access to targeted counseling intervention, access to academic tutorial support, and wrap around services.

Analyzing the data helped me create goals which I shared and reviewed at my first School Counseling Advisory Council meeting. The input I received at this meeting allowed me to select and finalize the three goals I targeted during the 2016-2017 school year. The importance of identifying specific goals to support the schoolwide goal in a manner that utilized my counseling skills to work towards academic and behavioral student outcomes was valued by the Administration.

Rationale

Goal 1

Retained students are found to have lower academic achievement, lower self-esteem, and a greater dislike for school when compared to their promoted peers. Therefore, with the number of students identified as At-Risk on the EWS for retention and the need to close the achievement gap, I wrote this goal and developed strategies to increase the number of students on the EWS passing English/language arts and/or math. This goal, like goal 2 and 3 is aligned with the district and school goal and promotes the school counseling vision “that all students achieve their fullest potential to become life-long learners with the skills necessary to meet the challenges and expectations of a 21st century technology-driven global community.” To meet this goal, I took a proactive approach and began meeting with students within the first month of school. I utilized strategies that included academic advisement; data chats; individual counseling; small group counseling; large group presentation on mindset; collaboration with staff, student, and parent to provide support to student; assignment of weekly progress monitoring; and parent conferences.

Goal 2

Poor attendance contributes to the achievement gap for students struggling socioeconomically and from Latino communities. With absenteeism in middle school being a predictor to dropout rates in high school, I wrote this goal as an opportunity to close the gap for our chronically absent students. A review of the data indicated that in 2015-2016- 313 students were identified as accruing 10 or more absences. To be exact, 140 students had 11-14 absences; 79 students had 16-20 absences; and 94 students had 21 plus absences. To meet this goal, I utilized the iAttend Initiative that implements the following strategies: attendance reporting and monitoring; parent outreach; individual and small group counseling; and referrals to social service agencies for students and families.

Goal 3

The rationale for this goal is - If children are not in school they cannot learn! There is no substitution for consistent and structured classroom instruction, which is why creating alternatives to outdoor suspension is critical and my commitment on creating a positive school culture is so important to student achievement. To meet this goal, I implemented activities that provided rewards for good behavior, targeted small group counseling session on effective conflict resolution strategies, trained peer mediators, and provided students and families with wrap-around services by cross-agency collaboration.

Supplemental Documents:
4. ASCA Student Standards Competencies and Indicators OR ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors for Student Success:

Attached Files:
  • ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors: Program Planning Tool View | Download
Narrative:
Every summer I review and revise the selected Mindsets & Behaviors based on data from the previous school year. I use the Early Warning System (EWS) and the District’s Attendance, Movement, Mobility, and Suspension reports to target individual student and school needs, and drive my core curriculum, small group and school-wide presentations. Furthermore, I reflect on my school counseling program components to identify gaps, priorities, and needs of students to ensure that my school counseling program promotes student success and is aligned with district, school and school counseling vision, mission, and program goals for the year. I review the Florida School Counseling Framework and analyze the ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors for Student Success to select standards that are developmentally appropriate for each grade and that align with the focus “that all students achieve their fullest potential to become life-long learners with the skills necessary to meet the challenges and expectations of a 21st century technology-driven global community.” Each standard chosen highlights a key mindset and behavior that when acquired will positively impact student achievement in any content area, attendance, and behavior. After cross-referencing all this information, I begin collecting my resources and I create a calendar highlighting the plan and priorities for the school year. My priority targets are to increase the passing rate in English/language arts and/or math among students on the EWS, decrease excessive absences, and decrease the number of students placed in indoor suspension while achieving equity.

The selected Mindsets and Behaviors also guide my core curriculum, schoolwide programs and activities. For example, our District’s Values Matter Miami Initiative assist students to achieve B-SS-2 by fostering the growth of positive peer relationships through instruction of the nine core values. The Digital Citizenship Initiative which is incorporated in Core Curriculum, Red Ribbon Week Activities, and Anti-Bullying programs assist students in building skills highlighted in M1 and B-SMS-2. I strive to make sure that all student programs and counseling curriculums outlined in my annual calendar have a connection back to the overall school counseling program goals and mindsets and behaviors.

In addition, these same mindsets and behaviors provide the foundation for my small group and individual close-the-gap support efforts with select students. In these settings students are provided with further support to generalize skills and knowledge to achieve success in any academic or behavioral situation. Students are selected for these services based on a pattern of limited improvement after regular reviews of progress monitoring data (grades, behavioral referrals, attendance). With these two intervention models, students receive targeted support to strengthen growth in their weakest Mindset & Behavior standard(s).

With my ASCA Mindset and Behaviors Planning tool in hand I began to match the appropriate Mindsets and Behaviors to the program components (i.e. core curriculum, small group, and closing the gap activities). As I matched the grade levels and intervention types, I noticed gaps and not enough focus on the attendance and behavior program goals. This led me to realign my focus to select the most appropriate program goals to match to domains, mindsets and behaviors. For example, I noticed that B-SMS-7 could be linked to Program Goal 3 for grade 6 and grade 8 and that B-SMS-1 could be linked to Program Goal 2 in grade 6 and 8 where I have the highest numbers of students with excessive absences. I spoke with the Administration about my perception of our students and how I believed that they have greater academic, career, and social-emotional needs than I targeted in the Mindsets and Behaviors but they reminded me to refer to the data, desired learner outcomes and school counseling program to be confident that my school counseling program provides equitable support to all students. Once the Mindsets and Behaviors were matched, I shared the tool with the principal, grade-level administrators, and team leaders who were all in agreement.

Lastly, each school year I engage in thoughtful review and selection of the Mindsets and Behavior standards. Because of this process, I ensure that student interventions are consistent with both the school goal and the school counseling program goals. Additionally, I build upon standards from one year to the next. Reviewing the Mindsets and Behaviors helps me highlight for students how their acquisition and growth in the varied standards improve their academic and behavioral performance from year to year.

Supplemental Documents:
5. Annual Agreement:

Attached Files:
  • Christine Estrada Annual Agreement View | Download
  • Estrada Fall_Use of Time Assessment_Daily View | Download
  • Estrada Fall_Use of Time Assessment_Daily Chart View | Download
  • Estrada Spring_Use of Time Assessment_Daily View | Download
  • Estrada Spring_Use of Time Assessment_Daily Chart View | Download
Narrative:
Each year, our Annual Agreements are developed to support the schoolwide and school counseling program goals. This year our department began the summer planning session with two school counselors. However, just before the opening of school (Mid-August 2016) one of the counselors was transferred to another position in the District due to low student enrollment at our school site. For the first time, I was the only counselor at the school with a case load of 744 students of whom 96% were Latino. I scheduled a meeting with the principal immediately to share my concerns of being the only school counselor and to stress the importance of continuing the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program with fidelity. I also wanted to share my continued desire to apply to become a RAMP school. We scheduled the meeting for the week prior to the opening of school.

At the meeting, the principal began the discussion by reiterating her advocacy for school counselors and allowed me to express my concerns (use of time, providing wrap-around services, delivering core curriculum, running small groups). She asked me if I had thought of a proactive approach to the implementation of services to students, I answered yes, and asked me to hold onto the ideas for later in the conversation because she wanted the assistant principals to be present. The conversation shifted to the changing school profile, outcome data, and the future needs of the students which influenced the school counseling program’s organization and focus. The major change to the school profile was the declining enrollment of students. Henry H Filer Middle is in the heart of a predominately Latino neighborhood. The declining enrollment was contributed to charter schools opening nearby. Next, we took a deep dive into the data once again, and saw gaps in student achievement that needed to be closed. The data indicated that 34% of our students had 10 or more unexcused absences and 12% of our students were placed in indoor suspension for incidents due to instigating behaviors that mainly led to digital citizenship infractions. It also stated that we had a significant number of students (432) on the EWS report with one or more indictors leading to retention. As we were analyzing the data, the assistant principals joined the meeting. Next, I presented my program goals to ensure that they were aligned and supported the schoolwide goals and addressed the issue of student achievement (academics, attendance, and behavior) and equity. We concluded that utilizing the school data reports often would drive the annual agreement and help me provide a targeted tiered support approach to our students.

Additionally, when evaluating the use of time assessment, the principal pointed out that she expected much of my time be spent in providing direct services to students after reviewing the data and wanted to ensure that my use of time aligned with ASCA’s recommendations. I was encouraged by her support of wanting me to spend 80% of my time providing students a comprehensive school counseling program. Equally, we discussed the breakdown of direct services for me to meet the needs of our students. I would need to spend 30% or more of my time delivering core curriculum, 25% of my time in individual student planning, and 25% in responsive services leaving 10% for program planning and school support as stated in my annual agreement. I noted that I dedicate time outside of work hours for program planning and school support and this time is not reflected on my annual agreement. Given this component lends itself to planning without student presence.

Furthermore, the principal stated that she was taking a proactive approach and seeking the District’s support. She asked to be assigned a Success Coach to work on the iAttend District Initiative. I stated that I was also taking a proactive approach and was beginning the cross collaboration with local agencies to provide wrap-around services to students. As the only counselor at the school, we agreed that it was necessary to be proactive and seek support. I expressed concern of fulfilling the non-counseling duty of leveling the master schedule for class size and asked to be relieved of that duty. The principal agreed and ensured me that she would find ways to support the comprehensive school counseling program. She divided all responsibilities that were non-counselor related to her administrative team and team leaders. After our conversation, I felt empowered that I could implement a comprehensive school counseling program with meaningful intervention to impact student success.

6. Advisory Council:

Attached Files:Advisory Council Members and Stakeholder Positions:
Ms. Emirce Guerra, Principal
Ms. Lizette Estevez, Assistant Principal
Ms. Christine Estrada, School Counselor
Ms. Savanna Luberto, Success Coach
Ms. Erika Baltar-Etienne, School Social Worker
Mr. Abel Fernandez, Language Arts
Ms. Claudia Morgan, Mathematics
Ms. Thais Garcia, Science
Ms. Georgina Triana, Social Studies
Mr. Daniel Bubbel, Electives
Mr. Juan Soto, 6th Grade Team
Ms. Arissa Horgan, 7th Grade Team
Ms. Yaimara Martinez, 8th Grade Team
Ms. Melanie Cruz, Student
Ms. Esmeralda Bisnett, Parent

Narrative:
In previous years, issues regarding the school counseling program at Henry H Filer Middle School were discussed through Leadership team and/or EESAC (Educational Excellence Advisory Council). Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year, we formalized the input of these groups and created the School Counseling Advisory Council. The Advisory Council was developed as a streamlined forum to discuss program goals, student needs, and school data directly related to school counseling. It also provides us an opportunity to collaborate with school stakeholders which is paramount to providing equitable school counseling services to all students. In addition, it has been instrumental in advocating for students and the feedback provided from its members is critical in the implementation of the school counseling program each school year.

As the Advisory Council began to develop for the 2016-2017 school year, I knew the selection of its members needed to be a representative group of stakeholders, but with staff reductions I knew this would be a challenge. I knew I wanted to invite students, staff, administrators, parents and community stakeholders that at one point or another had volunteered for different activities at our school. As I prepared for the first meeting of the school year, I thought about the challenge of either having the meeting in the morning before school or after school. Learning from the previous years’ experience, I decided that because of time constraints on parents, and student afterschool activities the meeting would be held in the morning before school. Next, I sent invitations to the stakeholders and made announcements asking for student volunteers. In September 2016, I updated the membership to include administrators, District Success Coach, School Social Worker, teachers, team leaders, a student, and a parent. Several community stakeholders were invited however; they did not attend the meetings. Regardless, I felt that the 2016-2017 Advisory Council members were invested in providing a nurturing culture in which students can excel to their maximum potential in an environment that is dignified, respectful and culturally diverse. For example, Ms. Bisnett is active in the PTSA, knows the school community, and has had three children attend Filer Middle. Finally, our school Social Worker, Erika Baltar-Etienne has been an integral part of the Filer family for 10 years and serves as a liaison between the school and community, providing knowledge in mental health and community resources to assist students in their social/emotional growth, health and wellness.

At our first meeting on October 21, 2016, we reviewed the school's demographic and performance data implications which were the focus for the program goals. We also had discussion on the school counseling mission and vision statements. Several suggestions on how to service the 432 at-risk students on the Early Warning Systems (EWS) Report were given. For example, Mr. Soto suggested team leaders assist in contacting parents and having them come in during parent conference days on Tuesday morning. Ms. Luberto, District Success Coach, suggested a parent night specifically for EWS students. I explained the ASCA Comprehensive School Counseling Model and the RAMP process. This proved to be helpful as it allowed for members to ask questions and get clarification on the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program. Finally, we discussed the implementation of MyCareerShines, Florida’s online career/college readiness resource which is a District mandate for all students 6-12. The meeting was concluded with a question/answer session that prompted a review of the procedures for dealing with a student in crisis.

At our March 17, 2017 meeting, we discussed the progress of the program goals for the year, and I updated the members on the delivery of the core curriculum lessons. We discussed the application process to be a Common-Sense Media Digital Citizenship Certified School, and how the Digital Citizenship core curriculum lessons will be the guiding force to obtain this certification. Our elective teachers volunteered to provide additional digital citizenship lessons in their classes to meet the required number needed to be considered for the school certification. We also discussed a plan to assist students in danger of retention. To conclude the meeting, Mr. Soto shared the success of the 8th grade parent night as well as the EWS students’ and parents’ attendance on parent conference days.

The Advisory Council has proven to be an asset, especially at a time when our school has had a lot of change. It allows us to come together as a school community to provide an equitable comprehensive school counseling program for all students.


7. Calendars:

Attached Files:Narrative:
At the end of the 2015-2016 school, I developed a tentative Year-At-A-Glance calendar for the 2016-2017 school year highlighting weekly activities to be completed during each month using our District’s School Counseling Suggested Schedule of Support Tasks and Activities. Throughout the 2016 summer, I used these documents to finalize the 2016-2017 annual calendar, and I began adjusting the annual calendar to reflect the use of time section in my ASCA Annual Agreement. Being the only counselor, I reached out to the school social worker, District success coach and motivational coach to assist in the development of the annual calendar.

Prior to the opening of schools at the first leadership team meeting, a draft of the annual calendar was presented to the team which is comprised of department chairs, team leaders, instructional coaches, testing chairperson and school administrators. This was the perfect venue in which to plan and finalize the calendar because we all sat and discussed important dates, particularly testing that could impact the implementation of the calendar. For example, Ms. Triana (test chairperson) informed us that all the computer labs would be in use for baseline testing that would begin the first week of school. I immediately brought to everyone’s attention that this would impact the start of the core curriculum lessons since I would need to use one of the computer labs. Ms. Guerra (Principal) quickly provided the solution that I could use laptop carts and begin these presentations in the classrooms versus the computer labs.

Next, we looked at our data and program goals for the year to prioritize how to best tackle the goals and what delivery systems would best fit those needs (Core Curriculum, Small Group, Individual Counseling). For example, we concluded that core curriculum lesson delivery was a top priority this school year because I had strategically planned to provide interventions organized toward increasing the passing rate in English/Language Arts and/or Mathematics, decreasing the number of students with excessive absences, and decreasing the number of infractions leading to indoor suspension. In addition, our District’s increased focus on Values Matter Miami and Digital Conversion brought to the forefront the need to include character education and digital citizenship lessons.

With the collaboration of stakeholders, the annual calendar was finalized, shared with staff via email and posted it in the main office to ensure they were aware of school counseling program activities for the month. I followed up with weekly reminders to staff of the activities via email, and morning announcements.

In addition to the annual calendar, I am responsible for the creation and submission of a weekly calendar the Friday before the start of a new week. My weekly calendars provide specific information for each day in each week and help me consistently evaluate how closely I align with my preset percentage targets outlined in my Annual Agreement. My goal is to make every effort that my weekly calendar correlates with the percentage of time allocated in my annual agreement (30% core curriculum delivery, 25% individual student planning, 25% responsive services, 10% consultation and 10% program planning). Next, I email my weekly calendar to Administration and the support personnel in my respective office area so each will know my individual plan and times of availability to aid students or parents each week. Also, every Monday I post a hard copy of it on my individual office door so students and staff know of my availability as well. Furthermore, I share my weekly calendar with teachers who are impacted by the implementation of the core curriculum lessons to make sure that the schedules do not impact their instructional time. Lastly, I share my calendar with the rest of the staff so that teachers and staff have an idea of counselor availability throughout the week. To further the communication to staff, I encouraged the school social worker, District success coach and the motivational coach to develop weekly calendars as well, post them in the areas that they meet with students, and share them with staff via email.

After examining and analyzing my weekly calendars, I held on-going conversations with my principal regarding the importance of being flexible to accommodate any student or parent urgent need as well as any crisis or incident that arises or if our on-going data reports indicate that an adjustment in the services we provide needs modification. She agreed and adjustments were made on a case by case basis. To illustrate, program planning time was moved to before or after school some weeks.

8. School Counseling Core Curriculum Action Plan and Lessons Plans:

Attached Files:
  • Core Curriculum Action Plan-Henry H Filer Middle School View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1-Digital Citizenship (Digital Life 101) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1-Artifact 1 (Digital Life 101) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1-Artifact 2 (Digital Life 101) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1-Survey Tool (Digital Life 101) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 2-Digital Citizenship (Cyberbullying-Be Upstanding) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 2-Artifact 1 (Cyberbullying-Be Upstanding) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 2-Artifact 2 (Cyberbullying-Be Upstanding) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 2-Survey Tool (Cyberbullying-Be Upstanding) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 3-Digital Citizenship (Safe Online Talk) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 3-Artifact 1 (Safe Online Talk) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 3-Artifact 2 (Safe Online Talk) View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 3-Survey Tool (Safe Online Talk) View | Download
Narrative:
During August 2016, I developed and designed the Core Curriculum Action Plan (CCAP) to support student acquisition of knowledge and skills consistent with the vision, mission, program goals, and selected Mindsets/Behaviors to ensure student needs are addressed for achievement. Using current data focused on achievement, attendance, behavior and my counseling program vision to shape the social/emotional development of my students, the Core Curriculum lessons were strategically created to provide interventions organized toward increasing the passing rate in English/Language Arts and/or Mathematics, decreasing the number of students with excessive absences, and decreasing the number of infractions leading to indoor suspension. In addition, our District’s increased focus on Values Matter Miami and Digital Conversion brought to the forefront the need to include character education and digital citizenship lessons. Taking a proactive approach to reach all students and minimize interruptions to the academic areas, the core curriculum lessons were delivered in elective classes during the school day. The elective teachers were essential in supporting the CCAP by always being available to co-facilitate a lesson if necessary. This arrangement allowed us to include all students, which included English Language Learners-(ELLs) and students participating in Exceptional Student Education-(ESE) programs.

The CCAP includes lessons from Common-Sense Media’s Digital Citizenship Curriculum for grades 6-8 that help create a positive school culture which supports safe and responsible technology use. These lessons are based on the research of Dr. Howard Gardner and the Good Play Project at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The curriculum encompasses differentiated lessons that address real challenges for students pertaining to cyberbullying, internet safety, and other digital dilemmas. Through the utilization of feedback from the students, staff, parents, community members, and collaborative meetings with the Administration team to review the Mindsets/Behaviors, I ensured that the most developmentally appropriate skills were taught at each grade-level. The collection of perception and outcome data for these lessons provided me the opportunity to provide follow-up targeted interventions to students. To illustrate, perception and outcome data was collected and used after each lesson for feedback. I shared the results with the Administration team and our discussion led to adjustments made to the delivery of the Common-Sense Digital Citizenship Curriculum. Instead of delivering each lesson in the curriculum to all grade-levels, we assigned lessons to each grade-level based on need and aligned the lessons with the value of the month in the Values Matter Miami Initiative. For example, in grade 6 I delivered the lesson “Digital Life 101” and aligned it with the value of “Responsibility”. In grade 7, I delivered the lesson “Cyberbullying: Be Upstanding” and aligned it with the values “Fairness and Kindness”. In grade 8, I delivered the lesson “Safe Online Talk” and aligned it with the values “Honesty and Integrity”. By doing this, it provided me time to deliver small group and individual student planning sessions for students who didn’t demonstrate understanding of the concepts which led to behavior infractions. (Goal 3 and the Social/Emotional Domain)


Other lessons in the CCAP include Academic Review lessons for 6th-8th grade students. These lessons took place in December 2016, four-weeks prior to the conclusion of the second nine-week grading period and were targeted to address Goal 1 and the academic domain. Perception and outcome data gathered for this activity included students understanding of the school’s grading/promotion policy, students understanding of the points each letter grade is assigned, and students beliefs that they could achieve the minimum number of points in each class to be promoted to the next grade-level. Students were encouraged to pursue excellence, as we approached state assessments and the third nine-week grading period.

Being that college and career readiness is imperative to middle school students’ success in high school, the CCAP includes lessons incorporating our state’s college and career readiness resource MyCareerShines. This platform allows students to take interest inventories, explore careers matched to their skills and interests as well as develop a personalized education plan. These lessons also provide a segway for me to introduce to students the Diploma Pathways that are a valuable to them as they work toward graduation. As planned these lessons were delivered to all 8th grade students. As noted on the CCAP the intent was to deliver the lessons to all 7th graders, however due to time constraints I was only able to deliver these lessons to 7th grade students in the iPrepMath-District: RTTT-D Grant. Lastly, I deliver core curriculum lessons that contribute to improved academic, socio/emotional, college and career ready outcomes for all students.

9. School Counseling Core Curriculum: Results Report:
An analysis of the core curriculum results report demonstrated the effectiveness of the school counseling program and classroom activities, and informed me of improvements that need to be made for the following school year. A disaggregation of data detailed the effectiveness of the use of the Common-Sense Media (CSM) Digital-Citizenship curriculum. Perception data showed growth when comparing the percent of students that perceived they were being good digital citizens from 67%(pre) to 81%(post) overall. This growth in understanding by students led to the decrease in the number of infractions leading to indoor suspension from 111 infractions in 2015-2016 to 24 infractions in 2016-2017.

The lessons from the CSM-Digital-Citizenship curriculum are designed to empower students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in the digital world. The curriculum can do this because it helps students realize that their ability to create a caring, supportive and encouraging classroom community is linked to their ability to balance their mental, physical, and emotional well- being with both being necessary to achieve academic success. This foundation closely embodies the ideals articulated in our school counseling vision and mission while supporting student achievement of identified program goals and selected Mindsets & Behaviors. Additionally, aligning the lessons to the Values Matter Miami Initiative and dividing the lessons among the grade-levels provided the opportunity to build on concepts and ensured me that I was delivering equitable support to every student.

The sixth-grade, “Digital Life 101” lesson focused on the importance of media connecting us in more social interactive ways than ever before, how important it is to carry out online relationships responsibly, and how using words and actions can help create a classroom atmosphere of encouragement and support for success. When comparing pre-and post-perception data results, I saw a growth in students that could identify the different uses of digital media from 50%(pre) to 58%(post), and a growth in students that could describe digital media as an interactive tool from 63%(pre) to 70%(post). However, the number of students that could describe digital media by using the term 24/7 stayed the same at 86%(pre/post). These findings illustrate that a comprehensive school-wide approach to delivering the lessons offered an opportunity to insert into students’ daily activities meaningful and sustained ways to positively effect outcomes not only academically but social/emotionally as well.

The seventh-grade, “Cyberbullying: Be Upstanding” lesson objective is understanding the differences between being a passive bystander versus a brave upstander in cyberbullying situations. Perception data results were encouraging because the core curriculum action plan was developed for the digital-citizenship lessons to build upon concepts, attitudes, and skills from one grade to another. Growth was shown among students when comparing pre/post data. For example, an average of 81%(pre) compared to an average of 86%(post) of students knew what it meant to be brave and stand-up for others. As more lessons were delivered and evidenced by the outcome data, we saw a school-wide shift in students’ mindsets and behaviors. For instance, it became common practice to witness Student A step in and intervene and accompany Student B to the office to show support as he/she reported the mean and hurtful comments posted online by one of his/her peers.

The eighth-grade lesson “Safe Online Talk” allows students to acknowledge the benefits of safe online talk and messaging, and consider scenarios in which they may encounter inappropriate behavior on the Internet. Perception data results were encouraging when comparing the average of students who believed that it was unacceptable to flirt and answer personal questions online from 76%(pre) to 84%(post). My findings led me to confirm that a comprehensive school-wide approach to teaching students’ strategies for recognizing and responding to risky online interaction is essential in shifting students’ mindsets and behaviors as they prepare to enter the competitive higher level of secondary education. However, in the future the answers to the questions used to collect perception and outcome data for this lesson need to be kept short and unambiguous.

In review, the delivery of the lessons using Nearpod engaged students and provided opportunities for students to collaborate and share ideas on digital-citizenship. What’s more, the implementation of this curriculum was key in creating and fostering a caring and safe school culture. In the future, I will continue using the CSM Digital-Citizenship curriculum for all grade-levels with an understanding that educating staff, parents and community stakeholders will further impact the school culture, and allow us to become a CSM Digital-Citizenship Certified School.

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

Lesson #1
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
6 Digital Life 101 Domain: Social/Emotional; M1, B-SMS 1, B-SS 5
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
March 6-10, 2017 186

6th grade students
Perception Data:

Perception data was gathered from the Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Curriculum.

Pre-test and Post-test was administered before and after the lesson on Nearpod.

Students responded to the questions below via their digital devices. Student responses were tallied electronically.

The results were analyzed and illustrated on the data chart attached.

Pre and Post Test student results were as follows:


1. Playing a card game online involves the use of digital media? (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
50% of students out of the 186 (93 students of the 186) answered TRUE.

50% of students out of the 186 (93 students of the 186) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
58% of students out of the 186 (108 students of the 186) answered TRUE.

42% of students out of the 186 (78 students of the 186) answered FALSE.

2. People use the term “24/7” to describe digital media because this type of media is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week? (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
86% of students out of the 186 (160 students of the 186) answered TRUE.

14% of students out of the 186 (26 students of the 186) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
86% of students out of the 186 (160 students of the 186) answered TRUE.

14% of students out of the 186 (26 students of the 186) answered FALSE.

3. Digital media is described as interactive because it means that people can make friends on the Internet and communication is two-ways? (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
63% of students out of the 186 (117 students of the 186) answered TRUE.

37% of students out of the 186 (69 students of the 186) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
70% of students out of the 186 (130 students of the 186) answered TRUE.

30% of students out of the 186 (56 students of the 186) answered FALSE.
As a result of the outcome data, it is inappropriate to state that this lesson alone impacted the decreased number of indoor suspensions referrals for the school year however, data pertaining to the misuse of digital media in the classroom referrals was collected by the counselor and documented in the District’s Data Student Information System.

Student referral data on the misuse of digital media in the classroom was compared throughout the school year (1st nine weeks, 2nd nine weeks, 3rd nine weeks, and 4th nine weeks).

A final analysis of the data collected through June, showed a decrease in the misuse of digital media in the classroom behavior.

During the first nine weeks, there were 39 referrals written by teachers for the misuse of digital media in the classroom.

During the second nine weeks, there were 22 referrals written by teachers for the misuse of digital media in the classroom.

During the third and fourth nine weeks, there were 18 referrals written by teacher for the misuse of digital media in the classroom.
The perception and outcome data indicated the Common Sense Digital Citizenship Curriculum, a researched-based curriculum, had a positive impact on grade 6 students by empowering them with strategies to deal with the social nature of digital media and to act responsibly when carrying out relationships over digital media.

The curriculum utilized supported the Mindsets and Behaviors and the lessons targeted the social/emotional domain. Addressing this domain helped promote students’ own conduct and communication behaviors by applying social responsibility and ethical decision-making principles.

The lessons were developmentally appropriate in that they were specifically designed for middle school students.

Furthermore, the process, perception and outcome data confirmed that I achieved my desired results and program goals.

My findings illustrate that a comprehensive approach to combining the Digital Citizenship Curriculum and the District’s Values Matter Miami Campaign offered an opportunity to insert into students’ daily activities meaningful and sustained ways to positively effect student outcomes not only academically but social emotionally as well. The digital citizenships lessons also offered my students the greatest benefit in their classrooms where the use of digital devices has become a common instructional tool. Interestingly, I also realized that the Digital Citizenship Curriculum wasn’t meant only for students alone. As I planned with teachers, I observed the need for them to also understand the importance of the digital citizenship lessons and make sure to continuously remind students of the strategies learned in those lessons. As the lessons were delivered and evidenced by the outcome data we saw a school-wide shift in students’ mindsets and behaviors on acting responsibly when carrying out classroom assignments over digital media used in the classroom and at home.

Moving forward, next year I will continue the implementation of the Common Sense Digital Citizenship Curriculum and to boost motivation in recognizing the importance of being a good digital citizen, I will begin a rewards incentive program for students to receive badges for their hard work and achievements. In collaboration with the teachers and the PTSA, we will set the threshold for the badges and work with community partners to donate additional prices. Furthermore, to enhance the implementation plan of a digital citizenship school-wide curriculum, I have initiated a collaborationwith administration, staff, parents, and community stakeholders to incorporate the following initiatives:

• to host a school-wide student produced Public Service Announcement competition to increase the awareness of digital citizenship and media literacy;

• to create a school-wide movement of becoming a Common Sense Media Digital Citizen Certified School by fulfilling the requirements to apply for the certification that includes activities such as writing a digital citizenship school-wide vision statement, creating a digital citizenship implementation plan, etc.

• to collaborate with the PTSA in implementing the Connecting Families Program offered by Common Sense Media.

Attached Files:
  • School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report-Henry H. Filer Middle School View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download
Lesson #2
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | Bullying |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
7 Cyberbullying: Be Upstanding Domain: Social/Emotional; M1, B-SS 4, B-SS 9
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
October 24-27, 2016 243

7th grade students
Perception data was gathered from the Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Curriculum.

Pre-test and Post-test was administered before and after the lesson on Nearpod.

Students responded to the questions below via their digital devices. Student responses were tallied electronically.

The results were analyzed and illustrated on the data chart attached.

Pre and Post Test student results were as follows:

1. An Upstander is someone who takes action and stands up for someone who is being cyberbullied. (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
90% of students out of the 243 (218 students of the 243) answered TRUE.

10% of students out of the 243 (25 students of the 243) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
93% of students out of the 243(226 students of the 243) answered TRUE.

7% of students out of the 243 (17 students of the 243) answered FALSE.

2. Lali tells Gloria that she keeps receiving mean messages on her cell phone. “That must make you feel awful,” Gloria says. “Do you want to talk about it?” Gloria is showing Lali empathy. (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
88% of students out of the 243 (214 students of the 243) answered TRUE.

12% of students out of the 243 (29 students of the 243) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
89% of students out of the 243(216 students of the 243) answered TRUE.

11% of students out of the 243 (27 students of the 243) answered FALSE.


3. Alina notices that a classmate keeps posting rude comments about her friend Mike on a blog. I believe Alina can become an upstander by asking her classmate to delete the posts and show Mike support. (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
67% of students out of the 243 (163 students of the 243) answered TRUE.

33% of students out of the 243 (80 students of the 243) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
78% of students out of the 243(190 students of the 243) answered TRUE.

22% of students out of the 243 (53 students of the 243) answered FALSE.
As a result of the outcome data, it is inappropriate to state that this lesson alone impacted the decreased number of indoor suspensions referrals however, data pertaining to cyberbullying referrals was collected by the counselor and documented in the District’s Data Student Information System.

Student referral data on cyberbullying was compared throughout the school year (1st nine weeks, 2nd nine weeks, 3rd nine weeks, and 4th nine weeks).

A final analysis of the data collected through June, showed a decrease of cyberbullying behavior.

During the first nine weeks, there were 9 allegations of cyberbullying. After they were investigated, 4 were founded and documented as Cyberbullying in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools reporting system.

During the second nine weeks, there were 13 allegations of Cyberbullying but 5 were founded and documented.

During the third and fourth nine weeks, there were allegations of Cyberbullying but none were founded after investigation.
The perception and outcome data indicated the Common Sense Digital Citizenship Curriculum, an evidenced-based curriculum, had a positive impact on grade 7 students by empowering them with the understanding of being an upstander not a bystander.

It was vitally important to closely monitor the perception data for these lessons throughout the school year to reassure that students continuously reflected on the importance of being brave and standing up for other others offline and online.

The curriculum utilized supported the Mindsets and Behaviors and the lessons targeted the social/emotional domain. Addressing this domain helped promote students’ understanding of being an upstander as opposed to a bystander, understanding how showing empathy for those who have been victims of Cyberbullying supported the recovery of the damage done by Cyberbullying, and provided students with opportunities to generate multiple solutions for helping others when Cyberbullying occurs.

The lessons were developmentally appropriate in that they were specifically designed for middle school students.

Furthermore, the process, perception and outcome data confirmed that I achieved my desired results and program goals.

Digging deeper into the perception and outcome data results, my findings led me to confirm that a comprehensive school-wide approach to educating, recognizing, and acting to prevent Cyberbullying was essential in shifting students’, and teachers’ mindsets and behaviors and promoting a safe school culture. Implementing the Digital Citizenship Curriculum partnered by the District’s Values Matter Miami Campaign offered an opportunity to insert into students’ daily activities meaningful and sustained ways to positively effect student outcomes not only academically but social emotionally as well.
As I planned and collaborated with teachers and staff to deliver the lessons, I observed the need for teachers themselves to also understand the importance of being an Upstander not a Bystander. It was eye-opening to teachers and staff that each one of them could recall a time when they believed they were taking action yet they were simply being a bystander to the infraction. As the lessons were delivered and evidenced by the outcome data we saw a school-wide shift in students’ mindsets and behaviors. For example, it became common practice to witness Student A step in and intervene and accompany Student B to the office to show support as he/she reported the mean and hurtful comments posted online by one of his/her peers.

I also realized that by delivering these lessons as close to the opening of the school year brought to the forefront potential issues before they could arise. The awareness of the students, teachers, and administration to be upstanders positively impacted the school culture by creating a safe environment for students.

Moving forward, it is imperative to note that our perception and outcome data indicated that students learned to recognize and respond to internal, external – negative and positive pressures regarding Cyberbullying. Therefore, I will continue the implementation of the Common Sense Digital Citizenship Curriculum and to boost motivation in recognizing the importance of being a good digital citizen, I will begin a rewards incentive program for students to receive badges for their hard work and achievements. In collaboration with the teachers and the PTSA, we will set the threshold for the badges and work with community partners to donate additional prices.

Furthermore, I have initiated a collaboration with administration, staff, parents, and students to review and update school-wide guidelines to protect students from Cyberbullying. Also, for the 2017-2018 school I am working towards the implementation of a school-wide mentoring program with the support of District staff, I will create the movement of becoming a Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Certified School, provide additional small group counseling for Upstanders, and parent workshops with the support of the PTSA’s implementation of the Common Sense Media’s Connecting Families program.


Attached Files:
  • Lesson Plan 2 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download
Lesson #3
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | College Readiness |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
8 Safe Online Talk Domain: Social/Emotional M1, B-SS 4, B-SS 9
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
September 25-29, 2016 289

8th grade students
Perception data was gathered from the Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Curriculum.

Pre-test and Post-test was administered before and after the lesson on Nearpod.

Students responded to the questions below via their digital devices. Student responses were tallied electronically.

The results were analyzed and illustrated on the data chart attached.

Pre and Post Test student results were as follows:

1. Marcus, a 7th grader, is chatting with Joel, a friend he knows only through an online virtual world. Joel asks Marcus if he wants to meet in person sometime. Is it okay for Marcus to agree to meet Joel in person by himself? (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
84% of students out of the 289 (245 students of the 289) answered TRUE.

16% of students out of the 289 (44 students of the 289) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
13% of students out of the 289 (38 students of the 289) answered TRUE.

87% of students out of the 289 (251 students of the 289) answered FALSE.



2. Alice is friends with someone who she only knows through an online chat room. Alice knows that when she makes an online-only friend, she needs to be careful. Alice’s online friend asks the following questions: What bands do you like?; Will you promise to keep our friendship secret?; Isn’t it cool that we like the same TV shows? I believe that Alice shouldn’t answer any questions. (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
89% of students out of the 289 (257 students of the 289) answered TRUE.

11% of students out of the 289 (32 students of the 289) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
97% of students out of the 289 (280 students of the 289) answered TRUE.

3% of students out of the 289 (9 students of the 289) answered FALSE.


3. Flirting with somebody you meet online is safe, if you are in control of the situation. (TRUE/FALSE)

Pre Test:
55% of students out of the 289 (159 students of the 289) answered TRUE.

45% of students out of the 289 (130 students of the 289) answered FALSE.

Post Test:
69% of students out of the 289 (199 students of the 289) answered TRUE.

31% of students out of the 289 (90 students of the 289) answered FALSE.
As a result of the outcome data, it is inappropriate to state that this lesson alone impacted the decreased number of indoor suspensions referrals however, data pertaining to inappropriate social media messaging and posting referrals was collected by the counselor and documented in the District’s Data Student Information System.

Student referral data on inappropriate social media messaging and posting was compared throughout the school year (1st nine weeks, 2nd nine weeks, 3rd nine weeks, and 4th nine weeks).

A final analysis of the data collected through June, showed a decrease on inappropriate social media messaging and posting in the classroom.

During the first nine weeks, there were 3 referrals written by teacher on inappropriate social media messaging and posting in the classroom.


During the second nine weeks, there were 1 referrals written by teacher on inappropriate social media messaging and posting in the classroom.


During the third and fourth nine weeks, there were no referrals written by teacher on inappropriate social media messaging and posting in the classroom.
The perception and outcome data indicated the Common Sense Digital Citizenship Curriculum, an evidenced-based curriculum, had a positive impact on grade 8 students by empowering them with the understanding of the importance of their digital footprint.

It was vitally important to closely monitor the perception data for these lessons throughout the school year to reassure that students could understand rules for safe online messaging, and feel empowered to deal with uncomfortable situations when communicating online. Especially since these students were getting ready to make the transition to high school.

The curriculum utilized supported the Mindsets and Behaviors and the lessons targeted the social/emotional domain. Addressing this domain helped promote students’ understanding that they have a digital footprint and that information from it can be searched, copied and passed on, and seen by a large, invisible audience, that it can be persistent, and in some cases, harmful.

The lessons were developmentally appropriate in that they were specifically designed for middle school students.

Furthermore, the process, perception and outcome data confirmed that I achieved my desired results and program goals.

My findings led me to confirm that a comprehensive school-wide approach to educating students that safe online talk, filling out a form, sending an email to a friend, posting a photo, and pretty much everything one does online – even the simple act of visiting a website or using a search engine – leaves a trail. This understanding was essential in shifting students’, mindsets and behaviors as they prepared to enter the competitive higher level of secondary education. Therefore, implementing the Digital Citizenship Curriculum offered an opportunity to insert into students’ daily activities meaningful and sustained ways to positively effect student outcomes not only academically but social emotionally as well.

As I planned and collaborated with teachers and staff to deliver the lessons, we created a think tank of important messages that our students needed to understand about safe online talk such as “The Golden Rule” - Treat others as you would like to be treated. Simply put, if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all. Remember, you can’t truly delete when you SEND. As the lessons were delivered and evidenced by the outcome data we saw a school-wide shift in students’ mindsets and behaviors. Classroom discussions continued throughout the school year that empowered students to deal with uncomfortable situations when communicating online and impactful positive decisions regarding their digital footprint.

I also realized that by delivering these lessons as close to the opening of the school year brought
awareness to the students on the importance of safe online messaging and their digital footprint. Moreover, it created opportunity for dialogue on goal setting and transitioninginterventions to prepare students for high school.

Moving forward, it is imperative to note that our perception and outcome data indicated that students learned to recognize and respond to internal, external – negative and positive online talk that would have a lasting effective on their digital footprint. In addition to continuing the implementation of the Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Curriculum next school year, I will promote the movement of becoming a Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Certified School. Additionally, to boost motivation in recognizing the importance of their digital footprint, I will begin a rewards incentive program for students to receive badges for their hard work and achievements. In collaboration with the teachers and the PTSA, we will set the threshold for the badges and work with community partners to donate additional prices.

I will also address the individual, familial and community risk factors as well as teach parents on negative and positive online talk that would have a lasting effective on their child’s digital footprint with the support of the PTSA’s implementation of the Common Sense Media’s Connecting Families program.

Lastly, I have initiated a collaboration with the feeder pattern high schools to streamline the articulation and transition of my students and educate students and parents on high school graduation requirements, diploma pathways offered by the District, and how a student’s digital footprint can affect college/university admissions.

Attached Files:
  • Lesson Plan 3 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download
Are the 3 lessons submitted part of the same unit? No

10. Small-Group Responsive Services:
Making small-group services an essential part of the comprehensive school counseling program at Henry H Filer Middle School enabled me to provide effective and positive direct services to students in need of extra support with academic, career and social/emotional developmental issues and concerns. These small-group services are supported by our vision, mission, and program goals utilizing achievement, attendance, and behavioral data as well as input from administrators, teachers, parents, and students. Based on the analysis of school data, topics for these groups were select and ranged from increasing student achievement (Goal 1) to standing together to understand and accept cultural-diversity which helped to reduce student behavioral infractions leading to indoor suspension (Goal 3). I choose lessons that focused on self-control, relationship building, self-esteem, mindset, cultural-diversity, paths to the future, and academic success.

Once the topics were selected, I planned each session to support student success by providing repeated, practical application of concepts to aide their use in creating a safe school culture where students focused on respecting differences in people. For example, I planned the “Strength Through Diversity” lesson to empower students with knowledge, attitudes, and interpersonal skills to help them understand and respect themselves and other students. Next, I analyzed the ASCA Planning Tool and selected M1, B-SMS-2, B-SS-5 that matched each group’s purpose.

While the EWS served as a starting point for selecting students, I knew that administrator, and teacher input was key in targeting students that would best benefit from targeted small-group services. I held a meeting with the principal, assistant principals, teacher leaders, and the District assigned Success Coach. Together, we compiled a list of 6th-8th grade students and prior to the first group session, I met with each student to confirm if he/she would benefit from the small-group experience. These steps provided me the confidence that the small groups would be highly effective, support the comprehensive school counseling program, and enhance student achievement while decreasing behavioral referrals to indoor suspension.

Perception data from our cultural-diversity small-group which included eight sessions indicated: 80% of students could accept and value differences in others (Session-Strength Through Diversity); 75% of students believed that they could act as an important role model, mentor, or hero to their peers (Session-Mentors, Role Models, and Heroes); 100% of students acquired the knowledge to maintain positive relationships with peers of different cultures to create a cohesive school environment (Session-Unlocking the Code); and 87% of students felt they could identify the positive and negative signs and behaviors of student relationships (Session-Healthy Relationships). These positive results were evidenced by the outcome data. There was a reduction of administrative and counselor referrals for cultural sensitivity mediations and thus the total number of indoor suspensions for all 6th-8th graders declined from 12% (111 students) in 2015-2016 to 3% (24 students) in 2016-2017. From the 31 students that participated in these small groups, 31 were referred for cultural sensitivity mediation/infractions during the first nine-weeks, 11 students were referred the second nine-weeks; 4 students were referred the third nine-weeks, and the final nine-weeks of school 1 student was referred therefore this intervention was key in us meeting and exceeding our goal of decreasing indoor suspensions for the 2016-2017 school year.

In addition, perception data from our small-groups for academic success-“Keys to Mastering Academic Success” indicated 100% of the students were able to calculate their current grade points and determine additional points needed for course completion (Session 1), 78% of the students could distinguish between a Growth versus Fixed Mindset (Session 2), 100% of the students were able to complete the Learning Styles Inventory and identify a primary learning modality (Session 3), and 100% of the students were able to articulate how they put in to practice the knowledge and skills gained by way of group participation in the classroom to support academic success (Session 4). The lessons ranged from September 2016 through June 2017 with group or individual follow-ups as needed throughout the school year. Outcome data indicted how students benefited from their participations in these small-group sessions as 78% (7 out of 9) sixth grade students; 94% (15 out of 16) seventh grade students; and 93% (25 out of 27) eighth grade students were promoted to the next grade-level.

These encouraging results led me to the conclusion that small-group services were delivered effectively and positively impacted student success. Next year, I plan on continuing the collaboration with staff, utilizing the data, and using a student needs assessment to drive the focus on prevention rather than intervention.


Attached Files:
  • Small Group Action Plan-Henry H Filer Middle School View | Download
  • Small Group Results Report-Henry H Filer Middle School View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1 Cultural Diversity-Strength Through Diversity View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 1 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 2 Cultural Diversity-Mentors, Role Models, and Heroes View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 2 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 3 Cultural Diversity-Unlocking the Code View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 3 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 4 Cultural Diversity-Healthy Relationships View | Download
  • Lesson Plan 4 Perception Data Collected Chart View | Download

Small-Group Results Report

Group Name: Cultural Diversity
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | Diversity |
Goal: By June 2017, the total number of indoor suspensions for all 6th-8th grade students will decrease by 5 percentage points from 12% (111 students- based on 2015-2016 enrollment of 921) to 11.4% (88 students- based on initial 2016-2017 enrollment of 774).
Target Group: 31- 7th Grade Students referred for cultural sensitvity mediaiton/behavioral infractions
Data Used to Identify Students: School Data-EWS Report, Behavioral Referrals
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Outline of Group Sessions Delivered
Christine Estrada Domain: Social/
Emotional Development

Mindsets and Behaviors: M1, B-SMS 2, B-SS 5
Topic: Cultural Diversity

Session 1:
Title: Connecting Our Group

Activity: Personal Timelines, The Maze

Materials: Masking Tape, flip-chart, markers, the Maze directions and key

Session 2:
Title: Strength Through Diversity

Activity: Culture Grams, Stand-up Sit Down Discrimination Exercise

Materials: Flip-chart, paper and markers.

Session 3:
Title: Mentors, Role Models and Heroes

Activity: Web of influence, Personal Web of Influence

Materials: Ball of Yarn, construction paper, markers

Session 4:
Title: Unlocking the Code

Activity: Boxed In

Materials: Masking Tape, flip-chart, easel, markers

Session 5:
Title: Healthy Relationships

Activity: Hot Shots, Relationship Reflections

Materials: Paper, waste can basketball hoop, Relationship Reflections Handout, pens/pencils

Session 6:
Title: Conflict Resolution: Squash it Before it starts

Activity: Squash it Before It Starts- Joe’s Story

Materials: Copies of Joe’s Story, markers, flip-chart

Session 7:
Title: No One walks Alone

Activity: Leadership Quote Reflection, Dear “Little Brother” Letter

Materials: Copies of Dear “Little Brother” Letter, pens/pencils, envelopes)

Session 8:
Title: Living and Leaving a Legacy

Activity: Reflections, Personal Eulogy

Materials: Markers, construction paper (various colors); sample of Personal Eulogy, Certificates of Participation
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
31
7th Grade Students

Group 1:
5 Students

Group 2:
8 Students

Group 3:
8 Students


Group 4:
10 Students

Overall Perception pre data gathered by
verbal activity evaluation at the beginning of each session to monitor learning, understanding, and gather participants’ opinions regarding the value of the intervention or activity.

Overall Perception post data gathered by
verbal activity evaluation at the end of each session to monitor learning, understanding, and gather participants’ opinions regarding the value of the intervention or activity as follows:

Session 1:
Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. I was born in the United States. (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (1 out of 31 students or 3% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (1 out of 31 students or 3% raised their hands when asked if it was FALSE)

2. I was born in a country outside the United States. (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (30 out of 31 students or 97% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (30 out of 31 students or 97% raised their hands when asked if it was FALSE)

3. I can speak more than one language. (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (16 out of 31 students or 52% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (20 out of 31 students or 65% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Session 2: (Lesson Plan 1)
Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. People make fun of other people who are different from them? (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (28 out of 31 students or 90% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (13 out of 31 students or 42% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

2. Meeting someone different from me makes my life better? (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (7 out of 31 students or 23% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (16 out of 31 students or 52% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)


3. I learned something by talking to someone who was different than me today? (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (13 out of 31 students or 42% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (22 out of 31 students or 71% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Session 3: (Lesson Plan 2)
Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. I have a role model, mentor, and or hero in my life in my web of influence? (True/False)
Pre Survey Results: (6 out of 31 students or 19% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (18 out of 31 students or 58% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

2. I believe that my role model, mentor, and or hero has taught me to treat others with respect. (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (6 out of 31 students or 19% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (21 out of 31 students or 68% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

3. I know that I can uplift and positively influence students within my web of influence. (True/False)

Pre Survey Results: (8 out of 31 students or 26% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Post Survey Results: (23 out of 31 students or 74% raised their hands when asked if it was TRUE)

Session 4: (Lesson Plan 3)

I am about to read a series of statements to the entire group that
some students experience.

If you agree with the
statements, you should raise your hand and remain with your hand raised until I ask you to put it down.

1. I believe that all cultures have “rules (codes)” like acts of courage, or “never leave a man/woman behind”.

Pre Survey Results: (12 out of 31 students or 39% raised their hands when because they AGREED)

Post Survey Results: (19 out of 31 students or 61% raised their hands because they AGREED)

2. My culture (heritage) influences how I treat others?

Pre Survey Results: (31 out of 31 students or 100% raised their hands because they AGREED)

Post Survey Results: (31 out of 31 students or 100% raised their hands because they AGREED)

Session 5: (Lesson Plan 4)
Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. I believe that guys and girls can just be friends. (Yes/No)
Pre Survey Results: (11 out of 31 students or 35% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (19 out of 31 students or 61% raised their hands when asked YES)

2. I believe I am capable of being a caring friend. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (17 out of 31 students or 54% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (27 out of 31 students or 87% raised their hands when asked YES)

3. I can get appropriate help from a trusted adult when I feel I am in a possessive relationship. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (6 out of 31 students or 19% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (13 out of 31 students or 42% raised their hands when asked YES)

Session 6:

Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. I believe that conflict creates problems rather than solve them. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (29 out of 31 students or 94% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (11 out of 31 students or 35% raised their hands when asked YES)

2. I know a “strategy” to use to diffuse conflict. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (4 out of 31 students or 13% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (31 out of 31 students or 100% raised their hands when asked YES)

Session 7:

Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. I believe that anyone can be a leader. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (29 out of 31 students or 94% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (31 out of 31 students or 100% raised their hands when asked YES)

2. I consider myself a leader among my peers. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (7 out of 31 students or 23% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (17 out of 31 students or 55% raised their hands when asked YES)

Session 8:

Questions asked verbally and student responses calculated by counting a show of hands raised to each question below:

1. I believe that a person’s character is formed by his/her struggles and obstacles that they have had to confront in their lives. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (3 out of 31 students or 10% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (13 out of 31 students or 42% raised their hands when asked YES)

2. I know that I can leave a legacy by accepting others and being culturally sensitive to them. (Yes/No)

Pre Survey Results: (1 out of 31 students or 3% raised their hands when asked YES)

Post Survey Results: (9 out of 31 students or 29% raised their hands when asked YES)
From the 31 students that participated in the small groups, 31 were referred for cultural sensitivity mediation/infractions during the first nine-weeks.

During the second nine-weeks 11 students were referred for cultural sensitivity mediation/infractions.

During the third nine-weeks 4 students were referred for cultural sensitivity mediation/infractions.

During the final nine-weeks of school 1 student was referred for cultural sensitivity mediation/infractions therefore we met and exceeded our goal.

As the data demonstrated, there was a reduction of administrative and counselor referrals for cultural sensitivity mediations and as a result the total number of indoor suspensions for all 6th-8th graders declined from 12% (111 students) in 2015-2016 to 3% (24 students) in 2016-2017.

By building an awareness of cultural diversity and respect for each other, our perception and outcome data indicated that my goal to meet the social/emotional needs of our students to accept each other, and work together to create a safe learning environment was met.

The small group lessons were evidenced-based and designed to support my program goals and the Mindsets and Behaviors by providing the opportunity for students to understand how different peoples’ views influence the way people respond to conflict. In addition, the group lessons encouraged student to be accepting of each other and to be responsible for their behavior. They also challenged students to believe that they could be a mentor or role model by their response to cultural diversity.

Accordingly, the outcome data indicates that the small group was delivered effectively as the number of students being referred for cultural sensitivity mediation/infractions was reduced. Additionally, we also saw a reduction in indoor suspension infractions school-wide as a result of changing the students’ mindset to foster a safe school culture.

Next year, I believe these small groups should be continued with adjustments as needed to fit the needs of our students depending on the new school year grade-level academic and social-emotional trends. These small group lessons had a definite impact on student’s understanding of what being cultural sensitive to each other means. For example, I heard English speaking students celebrating ESOL students they tried to speak and practice their English skills while in passing from one to another. This was unique because normally I would have to stop students from making fun of the ESOL students. With such a large immigrant population in our school it is going to be vital to ensure that we incorporate some of these lessons into the core curriculum lessons that every student in our school receives. By doing so, we are ensuring that all students receive a comprehensive school counseling program that meets their social/emotional, career and academic needs.

As I further reflect, I see the need to provide informational and skill building workshops for parents/guardians that complement the acceptance of cultural diversity and solve conflict. To facilitate this process, I will collaborate with community leaders to identify resources promoting cultural acceptance and positive responding to conflict so that I can provide parent outreach sessions.

11. Closing-the-Gap Results Report:
Goal: By June 2017, the number of 6th-8th grade students identified by the Early Warning Systems (EWS) list (*432 students) will increase passing rate in English Language Arts and/or Mathematics by 5 percentage points from 82% baseline [354 passing/432 students] to a minimum of 86.1% [376 passing/432 students]. *432 students are due to 9 EWS students enrolling over the school year.
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Academic Achievement |
Target Group: 6th-8th grade students as At-Risk on the Early Warning Systems (EWS) Indicator District Report exhibiting two or more At-Risk Indicators failing English Language Arts and/or Mathematics on the EWS at the beginning of the 4th quarter.
Data Used to Identify Students: Early Warning System (EWS) Indicators For Active Students With 2 or More Indicators M-DCPS District/School Report (April 2017)
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Type of Activities to be Delivered in What Manner?
Christine Estrada Domain: Academic; M1; B-LS 7, B-SMS 5, B-SMS 8 Session 1:

“Academic Achievement Bring it On”

Small Group Session with students to promote growth mindset.

Understanding the components of a SMART goal.

Student will write a SMART goal specific to promotion to the next grade.

Session 2:

iAttend -Attendance Works

Follow-up with Team teachers, student and parent to discuss the potential failure letter notification for grades and attendance.

Individual Counseling with student to reiterate the impact attendance has on their grades.

Assign student an Attendance Buddy to check in with him/her to motivate student to attend school.

*Attendance Buddy could be a peer, teacher, coach, administrator and/or counselor.

Session 3:

“What’s Your Style” (Learning Style)

Small Group Counseling session with students to identify student learning styles.

Academic advisement with student.

Session 4:

“TEAMS-Together Everyone Assures My Success”

Student/Parent/Teacher Team/ Counselor Conferences for on-going support to student.

Session 5:

“My Path to Success-Checks and Balances of Meeting Goal”

Individual counseling with student to review academic progress and to create a specific plan of action in where student will be enabled to calculate class grade and set grade specific goals for promotion.

Individual Counseling with student to assign weekly progress monitoring report (weekly monitoring by grade-level counselors with students).

Session 6:

“Opportunity Knocks-College and Career Readiness” (MyCareerShines)


Individual counseling with student to discuss college and career opportunities

Session 7:

“So Much To Do So Little Time”

Academic Advisement to keep student on track to promotion by on-going Individual Counseling with student to assign weekly progress monitoring report (weekly monitoring by grade-level counselors with students).

Collaborating with teachers and parents to ensure student is o his/her academic track to promotion.

Session 8:

“Moving On- Next Steps”

Individual counseling with student to ascertain provisional promotion status to next-grade level.

On-going meetings with parents to communicate provisional promotion status to the next grade-level.

Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
Students in grades 6th, 7th, and 8th on the EWS Report with 2 or more Indicators failing all core academic courses on the EWS at the beginning of the 4th quarter.

Each student participated in 8 Individual Counseling Sessions (The duration of each session was between 15 to 30 minutes)


Group 1: 13
6th graders


Group 2: 24
7th graders


Group 3: 32
8th graders

Perception data was collected at every session.

Session 1:

As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. I understand promotion requirements and can identify courses needed to be promoted.




Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
84.6%
(_11_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 92.3%
(12_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
7.7%
(_1_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 29.2%
(_7_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
70.8%
(_17 out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 91.7 %
(_22_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
8.3%
(_2_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 56.3%
(_18 out of 32 students)
answered YES
43.8%
(_14_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 96.9 %
(31 out of 32 students)
answered YES
3.1%
(_1 out of 32 students)
answered NO


2. I understand how many points are assigned to each letter grade?


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
84,6%
(11 out of13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 84.6%
(11 out of 13 students)
answered YES
15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 62.5 %
(_15_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
37.5%
(_9_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_24_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 84.4%
(_27_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
20.8%
(_5_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(32 out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(0 out of 32 students)
answered NO

Session 2:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. I am encouraged to come to school every day.

Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 38.5%
(5 out of 13 students)
answered YES
61.5%
(_8_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 92.3%
(12 out of 13 students)
answered YES
7.7%
(_1_ out of13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 62.5%
(_15_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
37.5%
(_9_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 87.5%
(_21 out of 24 students)
answered YES
12.5%
(_3_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade

Pre-test: 81.3 %
(_26_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
18.8%
(_6_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 93.8%
(30 out of 32 students)
answered YES
6.3%
(_2 out of 32 students)
answered NO


2. I believe that attendance is a key to success for graduation.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 76.9%
(10 out of 13 students)
answered YES
23%
(_3_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(13 out of13 students)
answered YES
%0
( 0 out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 79.2%
(19 out of 24 students)
answered YES
20.8%
(_5_ out 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(24 out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 78.1%
(_25 out of 32 students)
answered YES
21.9%
(_7_ out 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_out 32 students)
answered NO

Session 3:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. You are a certain kind of person, and there is not much that can be done to change that.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 100%
(_13_out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0 out 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 23.1%
(_3_ out 13 students)
answered YES
76.9%
(10 out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 100%
(_24_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
0 %
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 37.5%
( 9 out of 24 students)
answered YES
62.5%
(15 out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 100%
(32 out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 43.8 %
(_14_ out 32 students)
answered YES
56.2 %
(18 out of 32 students))
answered NO



2. I can identify how I prefer to learn.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
84.6%
(_11_ out of13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 77 %
(10 out 13 students)
answered YES
23%
(_3_ out 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 41.7%
(_10_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
58.3%
(_14_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 83.3%
(20 out of 24 students)
answered YES
16.7%
(_4_out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 28.1%
(_9_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
71.9%
(_23_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 72 %
(_23_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
28%
(_9_ out of 32 students)
answered NO


3. I know three effective test-taking strategies.

Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 15.4 %
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
84.6%
(_11 out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_13_out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 25 %
(_6_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
75%
(_18_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_24_out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 25 %
(_8_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
75%
(24_out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Session 4:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. I know that I have a TEAM of people that support me at school.

Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 61.5%
(_8_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
38.5%
(_5_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 87.5%
(_21_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
12.5%
(_3 out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(24 out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 81.3%
(_26 out of 32 students)
answered YES
18.8%
(_6_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_out of 32 students)
answered NO


2. I believe that my TEAM includes my parents, teachers, counselors, school administrators, and all staff at my school?


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 69.2%
(_9_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
30.8%
(_4_out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 87.5%
(_21_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
12.5%
(_3_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_24_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 68.8%
(_22_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
31.3%
(_10_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Session 5:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. I can identify the components of a SMART goal.

Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 38.5%
(5_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
61.5%
(8_out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 76.9%
(_10 out of 13 students)
answered YES
23%
(3_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 62.5%
(_15_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
37.5%
(_9_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 83.3%
(20 out of 24 students)
answered YES
16.7%
(_4_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 50%
(16_out of 32 students)
answered YES
50%
(_16_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 96.9%
(_31_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
3.1%
(_1_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

2. I know how to write a SMART goal.

Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 30.8%
(_4_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
69.2%
(9 out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 84.6 %
(_11_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 33.3 %
(_8_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
66.7%
(_16_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 79.2 %
(_19_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
20.8%
(_5_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 18.8%
(_6_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
81.2%
(_26_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 65.6%
(21 out of 32 students)
answered YES
34.4%
(_11_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

3. I know how to make goals a reality.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 53.8%
(_7_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
46.2%
(_6_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 58.3%
(_14 out of 24 students)
answered YES
41.7%
(_10_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 83.3 %
(20 out of 24 students)
answered YES
16.7%
(_4_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 84.4 %
(_27_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
15.6%
(_5_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 84.4 %
(_27_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
15.6%
(_5_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Session 6:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. Have you begun to plan for future college and career goals?


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 69.2%
(_9_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
30.8%
(_4_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 70.8%
(_17_out of 24 students)
answered YES
29.2%
(7 out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_24_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 43.8%
(_14_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
56.3%
(_18_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 32 students)
answered NO



2. Has MyCareershines encouraged you to begin or continue planning for future college and career readiness goals?


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 30.8 %
(_4_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
69.2%
(_9_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 41.7%
(10 out of 24 students)
answered YES
58.3%
(_14_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_24_out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 31.3%
(10 out of 32 students)
answered YES
68.8%
(_22_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: %
(_32_out of 32 students)
answered YES
100%
(_0_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Session 7:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. I believe that I can achieve the minimum number of points in each class to be promoted to the next grade-level?


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 76.9 %
(_10_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
23%
(_3_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_13_ out 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(0 out 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 70.8%
(_17_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
29.2%
(_7_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(24 out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 87.5%
(_28_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
12.5%
(_4_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 96.9 %
(_31_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
3.1%
(1 out of 32 students)
answered NO


2. To reach my goal of passing all my classes, I know I must complete all my assignments and homework on time.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 84.6%
(11 out of 13 students)
answered YES
15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 91.7%
(_22_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
8.3%
(_2 out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_24 out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
( 0 out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 84.4%
(_27_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
15.6%
(_5_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(0 out of 32 students)
answered NO

Session 8:
As indicated by the comparison of pre-and-post test, data questions listed below, students demonstrated an increase in knowledge and understanding of strategies to increase student achievement.

Pre-and post-test questions: Please indicate YES or NO

1. I know that if I fail a core curriculum class that next year I must give up an elective class to make up the class that I failed.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 38.5%
(_5_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
61.5%
(_8_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0 %
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 95.8%
(_23_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
4.2%
(_1_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(24_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 93.8%
(_30_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
6.2%
(_2_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(32 out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 32 students)
answered NO




2. Next school year, I know I can improve my grades if I put forth maximum effort.


Group 1: 6th Grade
Pre-test: 84.6%
(_11_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
15.4%
(_2_ out of 13 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_13_ out of 13 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 13 students)
answered NO


Group 2: 7th Grade
Pre-test: 95.8%
(_23_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
4.2%
(_1_ out of 24 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100%
(_24_ out of 24 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 24 students)
answered NO


Group 3: 8th Grade
Pre-test: 93.8%
(_30_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
6.2%
(_2_ out of 32 students)
answered NO

Post-test: 100 %
(_32_ out of 32 students)
answered YES
0%
(_0_ out of 32 students)
answered NO




















Based on the final grades in the gradebook out of the 69 students

2 students were withdrawn.

5 students were retained.

22 students will be making up a course in summer school or during the next school year.

40 students were promoted to the next grade level.

In comparing the overall school achievement data for Goal 1, the results indicate that the number of 6th-8th grade students as At-Risk on the Early Warning Systems (EWS) Indicator District Report exhibiting two or more At-Risk Indicators (*432 Students) - passing English Language Arts and/or Mathematics increased by 6% percent from the end of the First Nine Week Grading Period in October 2016 with a 82% baseline [354 passing/432 students] to a minimum of 88% final outcome [380 passing/432 students] by the end of the Fourth/Final Grading Period in June 2017.


Closing the gap for student achievement requires the identification of any significant and persistent disparity in the academic performance of students. To achieve this goal, I worked with the school administration team to analyze our school data, discovering gaps and developing targeted evidence-based interventions designed to narrow or eliminate the achievement gap at our school.

The data suggests that the closing the gap interventions were successful. In addition, the process, perception and outcome data suggest that students gained knowledge, skills and showed an increase in self-efficacy as detailed in our perception graphs attached.

From the (13) 6th grade, (24) 7th grade, and (32) 8th grade students who were identified approximately 10-6th grade (77%), 21-7th grade (87%), and 9 - 8th grade (28%) students were promoted to the next grade without having to attend summer school. Most students indicated that they believed they learned strategies and skills needed to increase their academic performance and gained an understanding of requirements for promotion. Teachers also reported that they witnessed an increased level of confidence in the targeted students (Growth Mindset), and thus they saw an improvement in student grades and behavior.

Changes planned for next year include:

Devising targeted interventions that help students evaluate their individual data earlier in the school year and help them understand how to manage the rigor of their course work.

Additional interventions: provide student and parent workshops to teach positive growth mindset and building resiliency skills, collaborate with our support staff (school social worker, psychologist etc.) to support and develop personalized plans for students in need of extra support or assist students who have a lack of resources, and implement a school-wide teacher/student mentor program to provide positive adult relationships for vulnerable students. The mentoring program will be designed to overcome barriers to closing the gap. Seek grant funded extended learning opportunities before and after school by applying for the Academic Enrichment Program.

Finally, my intention is to also have collaborative discussions with our advisory council to strengthen our school program by looking at root causes of the achievement gap and reinforcing a commitment to education for all students in our school.

Attached Files:The District’s “Early Warning System” (EWS) Indicator Report uses “near real time” data to define gaps in student achievement and it identifies three key factors (academic performance, attendance, and behavior) that are considered predictors of student outcomes. Interestingly, social science research uses these data sets to help educators understand the connections of dropping out of school and that dropping out of school is the culmination of a gradual process of disengagement from school that begins early in a student’s life. Understanding the EWS report, I am reminded of the increased responsibility as a school counselor for early intervention ensuring that all students are afforded the opportunities to succeed. In September, I began conversations with students, teachers, administrators, and parents to establish exactly the area of focus for closing-the-gap. An analyzation of the data indicated that 56% of our total student population (432 students out of 774), across 6th through 8th grade needed targeted support as an At-Risk EWS student for either academic, attendance and/or behavior. With such a large percentage of students struggling with academic, attendance, and/or behavioral concerns, I met with the principal to discuss an action plan. We knew we needed to analyze the data even deeper, and design a systemic closing-the-gap plan that would support students in a way that allowed for the removal of barriers and close the achievement gap that existed between them and non-EWS students at our school.

The plan included breaking down the data to identify At-Risk EWS students with two or more indicators failing English Language Arts (ELA) and/or Mathematics at the end of Quarter 1. This meant monitoring 88 students throughout Quarters 2 thru 3 with the support of the team leaders and in Quarter 4 narrowing the target group again to those failing ELA and/or Mathematics courses. We met with the team leaders explained the meaning of each indicator, and asked for their assistance to monitor student progress and parent contact. Furthermore, they were asked to make annotations on parent conferences. At the end of the third quarter, the administration team, team leaders and I met to further narrow our target group of 6th-8th grade students as At-Risk on the EWS District Report exhibiting two or more At-Risk Indicators failing ELA and/or Mathematics courses. The re-engagement of these students was vital to their promotion to the next grade-level and reducing their chances of dropping out of school.

The data indicated that the target groups by grade level were as follows:

13 targeted 6th grade students, 24 targeted 7th grade students, and 32 targeted 8th grade students exhibiting two or more At-Risk Indicators failing ELA and/or Mathematics courses in Quarter 4.

A combination of individual and group counseling interventions were chosen. The interventions used were evidenced-based, highly aligned, and developmentally appropriate. For example, I met with students on a weekly basis for 8 weeks for 15-20 minutes. During every session, students were given a pre-and post-test to measure understanding of concepts like growth mindset, SMART goals, the meaning of potential failure letters, attendance, learning styles, progress monitoring, calculating of class grades, college and career opportunities, and promotion status. Yet another example includes team leaders assisting with contacting the parents, getting their approval for the counseling sessions, and keeping parents informed of their child’s academic progress for promotion. Additional individual or group counseling sessions were provided as needed.

Our plan yielded the following results:

Out of the 69 students that were targeted, 2 students withdrew, 5 students were retained, 22 students will be making up a course in summer-school or during the next school year (these students were promoted based on the District’s Student Progression Plan) and 40 students were promoted to the next grade-level.

Given these results, I plan to continue to provide this level of targeted, systemic support for our At-Risk students because of the value it adds to their overall achievement. In the upcoming year, my focus will include devising interventions that help students evaluate their individual data earlier in the year and help them understand how to manage the rigor of their course work. I believe this will help students monitor their grades and improve their overall academic success sooner rather than later. As I continue my efforts to close-the-gap, I understand that lasting change requires a steady and deliberate process. Finally, it is my belief that our school team is vested in working together to support a greater level of academic achievement and success for this target population and all students.

12. Program Evaluation Reflection:As the only counselor at Henry H Filer Middle School, my role as a leader in the school is vital in the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program. Being a member of the school administrative leadership team affords me the opportunity to analyze data, have discussions on the grade-level expectations and trends, provide input on the school improvement plan, advocate for students’ needs, and work with District and community leaders to eliminate barriers to student achievement, attendance, and behavior. In addition, my leadership role has provided me the opportunity to have facilitated and presented professional development for teachers on cyberbullying, digital citizenship, crisis intervention, and cultural diversity which have led to improving the school culture as evidenced by the positive ratings on the 2017 School Climate survey submitted by teachers, students, and parents. Lastly, I worked with the District School Counseling Department as a lead middle school counselor to pilot a Florida Virtual School Summer Program to students in need of recovering a course for promotion which allows me to collaborate with remote teachers and advocate to close the digital divide among students in our school.

As you know, advocacy is one of the keys to implementing a comprehensive school counseling program. This was more apparent than ever this school year as our District entered its third year of Digital Conversion. Through the analysis of disaggregated data, I uncovered equity and access issues encountered by students such as the assumption that all students had Wi-Fi access at home. Teachers were concerned that students were not completing their online assignments. I utilized this information to advocate for students and collaborate with teachers, community stakeholders, and the District to plan and design opportunities that would lessen the digital divide among students. To illustrate, I reached out to teachers and asked for volunteers to turn our computer lab into an environment where students could come before and after school to complete their online assignments. I contacted one of my outside community resources to contribute supplies that would make the computer lab inviting for students. This led me to ask the PTSA to provide after-school snacks. Once the plan to offer the computer lab to students after school was ready, I reached out to teachers, parents, and students and held discussions about schedules, and student supervision. Their feedback was crucial in the success of the after-school computer lab. Teachers volunteered weekly to supervise while parents made conscious efforts to bring or pick up their children in a timely manner. Every morning and afternoon students lined up to attend to get their online assignments completed. This advocacy effort contributed to not only closing the digital divide among our students, but to increasing the passing rate in English Language Arts and Mathematics by six percent by the end of the school year.

Collaboration has been another valuable asset in the school counseling program generating change as clearly shown in the school-wide support implementing the Common-Sense Media Digital Citizenship curriculum, an important component of the school counseling program’s core curriculum. The Common-Sense Media Digital Citizenship curriculum has had a significant impact on the mindsets of the students, staff, parents, and the local community by ensuring that we created a positive school culture that supports safe and responsible technology use. I was key in leading this schoolwide initiative and collaborating with staff to deliver lessons to all students. It was important to me that school stakeholders understood that each occurrence of cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts the school’s culture and community. I ensured that teachers understood that even the most proactive intentions to reduce risks associated with this type of behavior was the catalyst for changing the culture of the school. I modeled lessons and provided support to equip administrators, teachers and staff to ensure that they had a strong foundation to address the topic with students. I introduced Digital Compass to students to help them better understand where they were headed online, what path they may choose and guided them to explore the digital world of the Internet without risking their real-world reputations. I collaborated with community volunteers to incorporate the Connecting Families program(workshops) which helps parents and students address important topics and have meaningful conversations about making great choices in their digital lives. As a result, Henry H Filer Middle School has been designated a Digital Citizenship Certified School by Common-Sense Media and is the only school in the District to achieve this honor. The Common-Sense Media Digital Citizenship Curriculum has had a tremendous impact on reducing behavior infractions for cyberbullying and the misuse of social media, and was the catalyst in changing the school culture for the 2016-2017 school year.

As I reflected on the 2016-2017 school counseling program, I analyzed all the data sources (Early Warning Systems Reports, suspension, attendance, retention, perception and outcome data from the core curriculum and small groups) and I collaborated with the leadership team, District Success Coach, school social worker, teachers, students, and community stakeholders to discuss areas for improvement. While our school performance data was positive in that student achievement increased, students accruing 10 or more absences decreased, and indoor suspensions decreased, my challenge this year was delivering the college and career lessons to all students. This is an area that will be the focus for improvement next school year. I plan to begin collaboration with Career and Technical Education (CTE) teachers early in the school year because our District is changing the MyCareerShines platform for college and career readiness to Virtual Job Shadow, a program that will be offered through CTE classes. Beginning in 2017-2018, students in middle school will be highly encouraged to take a CTE course therefore teaming with the CTE teachers will provide equal opportunity for all our students to receive the support necessary to successfully meet the CTE requirements and increase the delivery of college and career readiness lessons. Another area to improve is to increase the participation of community stakeholders on the Advisory Council. I will target specific community members that represent the students we serve and create a partnership that will ensure their participation.

Additionally, over the past several years the school counseling program has undertaken change. As the school has adapted to the rapidly changing needs of the 21st-century classroom, I have also adapted to the social transformation, which includes new technologies and a modern personalized educational learning environment. I transformed my role and delivered innovative curriculum to address modern concepts such as digital citizenship, and cyber-bullying prevention. I moved from a traditional counseling service model in which the student reports to the counselor’s office to a push-in model where the counselor meets with targeted groups and/or individual students in a specific area of the classroom. This is particularly evident in the iPrepMath classroom where the counselor has a designated section of the classroom known as the “counseling corner”. Students may request individual planning sessions; teachers may refer students or the counselor analyzes student data to meet with students to provide lessons or activities designed to support student achievement. For example, I met with students to develop and strengthen skills such as organizational study and resiliency skills or teach growth mindset, to name a few. This transformation in the way I delivered services has allowed me to reach more students, more efficiently than ever before and has permitted me to easily adapt and personalize my support based on the needs of a class, subject or student.

In closing, belief in student success, effective use of data, leadership, collaborating with school and community stakeholders to provide support to all students, advocating for all students, and seeking equitable outcomes are the foundation of a 21st-century comprehensive school counseling program that lead to systemic change. At Henry H Filer Middle School, I believe that these characteristics promote student achievement and systemic change ensuring equity and access to a rigorous education for every student leading to closing achievement, opportunity, and attainment gaps. This is evidenced in the all-encompassing core curriculum that is delivered to all middle-grade levels, and facilitates student development in three broad domains: academic, career and personal/social, to promote and enhance the learning process. In the 2016-2017 school year, the collaboration with teachers was the key in delivering lessons (grades 6th, 7th, 8th) that ranged from facilitating college and career readiness through the identification of career pathways to character education through the Values Matter Miami Initiative, to digital citizenship, to growth mindset, to learning and practicing how to foster relationships in a culturally diverse school community.

Attached Files:
Signature Page:
  • Henry H Filer Middle School Signature Page View | Download