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RAMP Application

School Information

Our school has received the RAMP designation previously and is applying to Re-Ramp: No
Have you or another counselor(s) in your school received formal, in person training or coaching on the ASCA National Model or RAMP in the past two years?:
Does your school receive funds from the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program?: No
School Name: Kapolei Elementary
School Address: 91-1119 Kama'aha Loop Kapolei, 96707
School District Name: Leeward
School Twitter Handle:
School year RAMP application represents: 2017-2018
Number of students in district: 3745
Grade Category: e
Grade levels served at school: K-5
Number of students at school: 860
Number of certified staff at school: 56
Number of Full-time school counselors at school: 3
Number of Part-time school counselors at school:
Average number of students served by each school counselor: 286
School setting: Suburban
Percentage of students identified as special education students: 12.44%
Percentage of students who receive free or reduced lunch: 47%

Percent Black: .5%
Percent Hispanic: 23%
Percent White: 3%
Percent Native American: .1%
Percent Asian: 20%
Percent Other: 24%

Names of other school counselors at school:
Matsunaga, Dane Matsunaga, Jaylin Mendoza, Shari

Names of other personnel:
Muriel Takano (Attendance Clerk) Mindy Nakashima (Testing Coordinator) Scott Chang (Student Services Coordinator) Susan Shinkawa (Behavior Health) Roger Watson (Complex Social Worker) Holly Bara (Complex Psychologist) George Kaahanui (Parent/Community Coordinator) Sheri Gaza (Response to Intervention) Roxanne Galeai (Data Teams) Laurie Meyer (Universal Screener)

Written Portions and File Attachments

1. Vision Statement
School Counseling Program Vision Statement:
The vision of Kapolei Elementary School’s Counseling Program is that all of our students will be life-long learners that will graduate, be college and career ready, and meet the global challenges of the 21st century. Our students will also be people of good character (Trustworthy, Respectful, Responsible, Fair, Caring, Citizenship) that will be role models and community contributors.

School Counseling Program Beliefs:
Kapolei Elementary School Counseling Department Belief Statements
*All Students have the ability to achieve, which will result in college and career success
*The students developmental needs are best met by implementing a comprehensive school counseling program
*The school counselor must be an advocate for students, who create equal access to a rigorous curriculum and extra-curricular activities for personal growth for every student
*The comprehensive school counseling program will be planned, managed, delivered, and evaluated by licensed professional school counselors
*Data from various sources (behavior, attendance, report card, achievement) will drive the goals that the counseling department will focus their attention on
*Applying the ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors empowers school counselors to maintain the highest standard of integrity, leadership, and professionalism

School Vision Statement:
Kapolei Elementary is a place of excellence.

District Vision Statement:
Campbell and Kapolei Complex students are life-long learners and community contributors supported by a caring, professional, and comprehensive school counseling program.

Narrative: Our process for developing the vision statement began 3 years ago during our initial ASCA Model Training with Dr. Paul Barnes. The school counselors worked on creating their counseling departments vision statement that aligned to their school’s vision. The complex also collaborated to create a unified school counseling program vision statement. The focus was on students and where we see them 5-15 years in the future.

The influence our beliefs had on the development of our vision statement is evident in a few ways. First, we believe that data from various sources will drive the goals that the counseling department will focus their attention on. Our closing the gap goal was based on our 4th grade students, who had the highest number of students with 15 or more absences. Our other 2 program goals were developed from our behavior referral data, which has shown that classroom and playground referrals were the 2 highest areas of concerns. Second, we believe the comprehensive school counseling program will be planned, managed, delivered, and evaluated by licensed professional school counselors. Our counseling department consists of three licensed school counselors. And although we have other members within the team (school services coordinator, behavior health specialist) that we consult and collaborate with, we decide how we will implement our program and deliver services.

Our vision statement drives our school counseling program. For example, we envision our students being people of good character. Our core curriculum lessons focus on promoting character development (Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship), which helps them to become people of good character in school, at home, and in their community. We envision our students to be life long learners that will graduate and be college and career ready. Our attendance group was created not only to improve their attendance, but to build life skills (ex. responsibility, goal setting, that will prepare them for college and career success.

Attached Files:
2. Mission Statement:
School Mission Statement: The school community will provide a safe and nurturing environment with a meaningful standards based curriculum.

School Counseling Mission Statement: The mission of Kapolei Elementary School's Counseling Program is to provide a comprehensive, developmental school counseling program that assists all students reach their maximum potential. The program will provide a safe and nurturing environment through a curriculum with data driven interventions and student focused activities that promote academic achievement, career development, and social emotional growth. In partnership with educators and stakeholders, our program advocates for equity, access, and success for all.

Narrative:
Our mission statement was developed during our initial ASCA Model Training with Dr. Paul Barnes (3 years ago). The school counselors within our Complex was tasked to create their counseling program’s mission with their school’s mission statement by using similar vocabulary. We also used linkages within the complex schools mission statements to create a complex school counselor’s mission statement. We compiled a list of words/phrases that was used at each of our school’s mission statements. Words/phrases like “safe”, “nurturing”, “life long learners”, and “community contributors” were noted to use to create uniformity.

Our school counseling program’s mission statement addresses equity by giving students what they need to be successful, through specific interventions and activities. For example, one student might be okay with being taught character development through our core curriculum guidance lessons. While another student may need additional support such as small group services or individual counseling. Our school counseling program provides access to all students by giving each student the opportunity to receive our program and services regardless of race, socio economic status, gender, and mental or physical disabilities. By ensuring our counseling program advocates equity and access for all, ensures that we want all of our students to be successful.

Our counseling program’s mission statement addresses long range results for all students in a variety of ways. Ultimately, the mission of our school counseling program is to provide a comprehensive, developmental program that assists all students reach their maximum potential. We work to ensure that our school climate is emotionally and physically safe and supportive so that their potential can be reached. We want to provide a safe and nurturing environment where all students can grow to reach their fullest potential as they move on through middle school, high school, college, and the world of work. For example, transitioning between grade to grade and school to school is very important. The counseling department plays a crucial role to ensure our student’s have the supports they need in place prior to moving on to the next grade or school. If we see that a particular student may benefit from being paired with a particular teacher, the recommendation is made to help the student establish a positive relationship with their future teacher, which will help reduce behavior incidents. Consultation with the middle school counselors are also held to ensure that they are made aware of particular students and their background of strengths and needs so they can appropriately plan and transition each student as they enter middle school. Additional tours to the middle school is scheduled with the middle school counselor, incoming student, and parent to help them address any concerns that may have about the middle school experience.

Attached Files:
3. School Counseling Program Goals:

Goal 1:
By May 2018, 5th grade students who had 15 or more absences will decrease by 20 percent from 36 students (2016-17) to 29 students (2017-18).

  • Attendance
Goal 2:
By the end of the 2017-18 school year, there will be a 10% reduction in playground referrals from 35 referrals (2016-17) to 31 referrals (2017-18).

  • Behavioral Issues
  • Conflict Resolution
Goal 3:
By the end of the 2017-18 school year, there will be a 10% reduction in classroom referrals from 50 referrals (2016-17) to 45 referrals (2017-18).

  • Behavioral Issues
  • Character Education

Narrative:
The process for developing our school counseling program goals were selected after much discussion and collaboration with the Department, Administration, and School Data Team. As a part of our School Data Team, each member is responsible for using data to track success or needs depending on area of focus. The counseling department was tasked to track data regarding attendance and behavior referrals.

Program goals can address student learning and/or student inequalities. For example, in looking at our school data profile, our Pacific Islander subgroup had the lowest percentage of daily average attendance the past 3 years (93.4%, 92.5%, 92.8%) compared to our school average (94.7%, 94.2%, 94.2%). Although we have not created a goal to work on improving this subgroup, we will in the future (focusing on Grade 5 students with 15 or more absences).

Our program goals were founded through outcome data.
Goal 1- Attendance
Based on our end of year attendance reports from 2016-17 school year, there were 36 students in 4th grade with 15 or more absences (highest grade level). We targeted this group of students for our Closing The Gap, in hopes that there would be a 20% reduction in students with 15 or more absences.

Goal 2- Playground Referrals
Based on our school’s behavior referral data the past 4 years, we have averaged 57 playground referrals per year. Playground referrals have been our 2nd highest area by location. Our goal was to have a 10% reduction in playground referrals from 35 (16-17) to 31 (17-18)

Goal 3- Classroom Referrals
Based on our school’s behavior referral data the past 4 years, we have averaged 62 classroom referrals per year. Classroom referrals have been our highest area by location. Our goal was to have a 10% reduction in classroom referrals from 50 (16-17) to 45 (17-18).

Goals are important to our school because it gives our program an area of focus. The goals sets the direction of the program and to help determine resources needed to meet our goals. Prior to the ASCA National Model, our counseling program didn’t have the same direction. This allows other staff members to see that the counseling department has set their own goals and has a systematic way to accomplish them, instead of just “winging it” and waiting for students to come our way.

Supplemental Documents:
4. ASCA Student Standards Competencies and Indicators OR ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors for Student Success:

Attached Files:Narrative:
ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors for our counseling program, were intentionally and carefully selected after several revisions throughout the past 3 years. When we initially looked at selecting Mindset and Behavior standards, we used the strategy of checking all that applied to our counseling program. After attending RAMP trainings, viewing webinars, and reading the ASCA National Model Implementation Guide, it became clear that we were over-identifying standards. We then became more selective in choosing Mindsets and Behaviors that were evident in our counseling services.

The ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors serve as the foundation for core curriculum, small-group, and closing the gap activities. Initially, our department would check off each Mindset and Behavior and note the grade level that fit. But we realized that we should identify which Mindsets and Behaviors serve as the foundation for our core curriculum, small group, and closing the gap activities specifically. This gave our program a more clear focus and visually, we could see where and how we are addressing our students with our support services.

For the past 3 years, we have been evolving with our use of the ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors Program Planning Tool. By identifying which Mindsets and Behaviors are the focus for our core curriculum, small group, and closing the gap activities, it became visually clear that our services were focused heavily on the social/emotional standards. With our guidance curriculum (Character Counts), the lessons are heavy focused on social/emotional lessons. By using the Planning Tool, we realized that our counseling department needs to be more diverse in the type of lessons we cover for our core curriculum. In the future, we will be focusing on expanding our core curriculum guidance lessons to touch up on more career and academic standards. We will also look into providing small groups that can address academic standards (ex. Study skills, test-taking strategies) as well.

Supplemental Documents:
5. Annual Agreement:

Attached Files:Narrative:
Our counseling department meets prior to the start of the year, which gives us a chance to help plan our counseling program activities and events. We also create a 100 day plan and 3 year plan to help organize ourselves and get ready for the year to come. Three years ago, we started to implement the ASCA National Model and has since added the Annual Agreement as a tool to set and prioritize initiatives for the counseling department.

Our principal meets with each counselor individually and as a department to reflect on the past year to see what worked and what we can improve on. Since we have added the Annual Agreement, our administration has been supportive of our counseling program initiatives. They allow us to plan and decide how our program will be run. They have also added that we will be implementing the ASCA National Model in our school’s Academic and Financial Plan, which shows our staff, community, and the state that counseling is a vital part of our school.

The school counselor’s use of time in support of the program goals and the comprehensive school counseling program is one that is a work in progress. The aim of 80 percent direct/indirect services and 20 percent program planning/school support is what our department is trying to meet consistently. For example, our biggest obstacle is during our school’s lunch recess time block from 10:50am-12:50pm. During this time there are 3 different lunch/lunch recess periods and there are times where counselors are asked (not mandated) to assist with supervision during lunch recess to help support students that have behavior difficulties with peer play (anger management, conflict resolution). Technically it is viewed as a non-school-counseling task. But the counseling department has seen the benefit in being visual during this time. It has allowed us to focus on student safety, observe and review behavior expectations for students that we provide counseling, and progress monitor skills that we are trying to teach and reinforce. We are still working on finding a balance between balancing between supervision and our other duties that best serves our students, while keeping them safe.


During the 2015-16 school year, we began our journey with the ASCA National Model and had a discussion within the counseling department regarding our roles and responsibilities. We first discussed how to divide up the grade levels (K-5). It was decided that one counselor will service grades K and 1, one will service grades 2 and 3, and the other counselor service grades 4 and 5. The following school year (2016-17), there was personnel change. We had a counselor retire and a new counselor transfer to our school. At this time, we decided to re-look at the distribution of grade levels. In looking at our school’s lunch recess schedule, we felt it would be better fit to have each counselor (3 counselors in our department) take one lower grade (K, 1, 2) and one upper grade (3, 4, 5). The reason for that was to allow each counselor to be able to service their grade level students (whether through individual, group, or observation on the playground) at different times. For example, Mr. Matsunaga, who services grades 1 and 5 would be able to service grade 1 from 10:50-11:25am and grade 5 from 12:15-12:50pm. Our department also looked at some of our other responsibilities to try and fit the strengths of each individual counselor. It was agreed that Mr. Matsunaga would serve as department chair, lead counselor regarding attendance and behavior referral tracking, homeschool coordinator, and Student Council advisor. Ms. Mendoza would serve as our character counts curriculum lead, and Junior Police Officer advisor. Ms. Matsunaga, who is new, would serve as the Aloha Club advisor. In the future, more responsibilities will be added to Ms. Matsunaga to help her transition to our school.

6. Advisory Council:

Attached Files:Advisory Council Members and Stakeholder Positions:
Jesse Anderson (student)
Robin Anderson (parent)
Amber Fujimoto (teacher)
Joanna Tirado (community)
Lydell Acosta (school board, district resource)
Cindy Otsu (administration)
Cosmo Arakawa (administration)
Karalynne Bautista (counseling intern)
Dane Matsunaga (counselor)
Jaylin Matsunaga (counselor)
Shari Mendoza (counselor)

Narrative:
The advisory council was developed after discussions with our counseling department on how much people should it consist of and what type of person we should select. We knew that we needed members in administration, teacher, parent, student, community, and school board. Our purpose for creating an advisory council was to let stakeholders know what we do as school counselors and that our program is comprehensive, developmental, and based on data. The goal was to build partnerships with our stakeholders so they can give their input about our program and make necessary changes as our counseling department sees fit.

The process for selecting our advisory council members was carefully considered. Prior to starting out, we wanted to make sure we had members from all stakeholders. Our counseling department and administration was on board we needed to find a teacher representative. We decided to ask a teacher in the lower grades to serve. Reason is that our lower grade teachers are not aware of the counseling department’s responsibilities. There was a perception that the counselors are visible because they are “not busy”. Our student representative is a member of student council and was brought to the advisory council to give insight to a student’s perspective about student behavior, attendance, and achievement. We asked a few people in our parent and community group, but decided on one each. We also invited our District Resource Lead, who is responsible for the school counselors to attend as well.

The advisory council provides input and feedback on the school counseling program’s goals and activities. During our Fall Advisory Council meeting, our teacher, parent, and community members were very surprised at “how much things the counselors do” and was impressed with the presentation and data sharing of our program. Our district resource lead shared after the Fall meeting that she was impressed that the locations of specific behaviors have been identified and it seems like our program has a good process to identify students that need servicing (Response To Intervention). Finally, our principal closed the meeting by thanking all stakeholders for coming and acknowledging our counseling department for its hard work and its implementation of the National Model.

Our counseling program will be incorporating advisory council feedback from stakeholders towards accomplishing program goals. For example, our student representative shared during our Spring Advisory Council meeting that the students agreed that the basketball courts were overcrowded and was a factor in some behavior referrals. This coming school year, we will implement a new lunch recess procedure having a smaller number of students on the basketball courts to prevent overcrowding. In addition, we will also be separating the lunch recess periods so that there will only be one grade level out at lunch recess instead of two, which will bring the student to adult ratio from 50 to 1 down to 37 to 1. Another example, our teacher representative also shared during our Spring meeting that the drastic drop in classroom referrals (50 to 23) may have been due to our Growth Mindset initiative, where teachers build a positive classroom environment by encouraging their students to overcome challenges or struggles. Our principal shared that all teachers will be trained on Growth Mindset next year and will be implemented in their classrooms.


7. Calendars:

Attached Files:Narrative:
Our annual calendar is developed during our annual resource team meeting. At this time, all resource teachers come in one day during the summer to plan for the year and request dates for activities to prevent from overscheduling. Once we submit our dates for activities we are planning, we put those dates on our annual calendar. The annual calendar has been extremely helpful in keeping us organized. Our weekly calendar is always changing depending on the time of year and students that are being serviced at the time. Early in the year, there are few students we are servicing, but once the counselors receive our Response To Intervention Screeners from the grade level teachers, there is more clarity on which students need to be serviced and when they will be serviced during the week.

Priorities for our annual calendar are activities and events that we do on an annual basis. For example, our Response To Intervention screeners will go out after the first month of school and collection the week after. Our student council and Junior Police Officers events that we do annually are placed on the calendar so the counseling department knows what’s coming. We also plan out some of our parent nights and advisory council meetings as well. Priorities for our weekly calendar begin with blocking out time for servicing students with counseling on their IEP’s or 504 plans. We have also blocked off a specific times to implement our core curriculum lessons, which is dependent on each grade level’s content block, the time period designated to implement our lessons.

Collaborative conversations between the counseling department, administration, and other staff members do occur. During our counseling department meetings with administration every month, we discuss calendar events to ensure we are on the same page and if there are changes, we all make sure we note it. During our monthly resource team meetings, we take a look at the upcoming month’s activities and make changes if there are new activities being added, deleted, or postponed. Nonetheless, having our annual and weekly calendars are necessary for our department to keep track of changes.

Our annual and weekly calendars are shared with stakeholders through our advisory council meetings. Displays are made so they can see all components of the National Model, including our annual and weekly calendars. In addition we post our weekly calendar in our offices so others can see what we do and there is purpose to the services we provide.

The annual and weekly calendar are adjusted based on situations that arise during the school year. During the month of May, our last month of school, our 5th grade class had to move their end of year celebration 3 weeks early due to shortage of school buses. The grade level teachers and administration was concerned that the final 3 weeks of school might be an opportunity for increased behavior concerns from our 5th graders. Therefore, it was decided that the counseling department would revise their schedule to assist with teambuilding activities during lunch recess to prevent 5th graders from engaging in inappropriate behaviors. The counseling department notified teachers and students that were affected and tried to reschedule services. In collaboration with administration and our physical education resource teacher, we implemented a 3 week long “6 pillar class Olympics”, which provided 5th grade classes an opportunity to earn points to win the competition through participation and exhibiting good sportsmanship.

In looking at our fall weekly calendar in comparison with our spring weekly calendar, it was evident that the fall weekly calendar was not in line with the percentages of time we were aiming for in our annual agreement. Despite submitting it at different times of the year in the fall, we all fell short of what we agreed to. This caused us to take a look at our services and how we were providing it, and made a conscious effort to distribute our time in alignment with our annual agreement. Thus, our spring weekly calendar showed we were able to meet our percentage of time. This will always be a balancing act, depending on the time of year and what is going on, but tracking our time by using our weekly calendar and/or the use of time assessment, it will help the counseling department stay on track.

8. School Counseling Core Curriculum Action Plan and Lessons Plans:

Attached Files:Narrative:
Our school counseling core curriculum action plan are linked to our program vision, mission, and program goals. In our program vision statement, we stated that “Our students will be people of good character (Trustworthy, Respectful, Responsible, Fair, Caring, Citizenship)”. In our core curriculum plan, the majority of our lessons are based on Character Counts curriculum resources. In our program mission statement, we stated that “The program will provide a safe and nurturing environment through a curriculum with data driven interventions”. Our core curriculum has been a work in progress to be data driven. We are learning about process, perception, and outcome data; and how using data can either validate what we are doing or make changes if it is not showing a positive effect. Our core curriculum is linked to our goals as the lessons we have been chosen to create a positive effect on decreasing playground referrals, classroom referrals, and students with 15 or more absences.

In developing our core curriculum action plan, many things have to be considered. To address developmental needs, we implement lessons that are grade level appropriate through our curriculum we use and sometimes make tweaks to the lesson if the counselors see fit. The lessons have also been carefully planned to address our program goals (playground behaviors, classroom behaviors, attendance) and provide data to see if the lessons have a positive effect on accomplishing our goals. One thing that the department has to work on is trying to diversify our lesson to address more academic and career standards.

Our delivery of our core curriculum can be affected by exceptions or circumstances. For example, during the 4th quarter (April, May) we were unable to conduct our lessons to our 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade classes. Our principal wanted time for our teachers to prepare their classes for our annual statewide test. In the future, we will consult with administration on finding another alternative such as doing lessons earlier.


Currently, the school counselors are delivering guidance lessons. There have been collaborative discussions on having our classroom teachers deliver some lessons as well. We will be looking into this option with teachers, which may allow more flexibility to teach more lessons in addition to our Character Counts Pillars.

9. School Counseling Core Curriculum: Results Report:
Peaceful Solutions (September 2017)
Based on our behavior referral data, 5th grade annually has the second highest referrals and we wanted to use this lesson in hopes that it will be reduced. The lesson was delivered to all 5th grade classes (135 students). Pre/Post perception data showed increases to all questions. “I believe that it is important to report verbal or physical incidents to an adult” showed an increase of 3.54 to 4.47. “I know 3 adults I can see to report incidents” showed an increase of 3.01 to 4.71. “I know how to help a student that was harmed verbally or physically” showed an increase of 2.82 to 4.40. “I know how to resolve conflicts in a peaceful manner” showed an increase of 3.06 to 4.55. Outcome data showed that there were 20 behavior referrals compared to 21 the year before. But when it is broken down by quarters, it showed that there were 2 referrals in 1st semester and 18 in 2nd semester referrals. Based on data, we are looking at deciding if we should deliver this lesson later in the year (2nd semester) or have a follow up lesson to remind them of behavior expectations.

Goals to Improve Attendance (November 2017)
Improving our attendance was one of our top priorities and we implemented this lesson to our upper grade classes (400 students in grades 3-5). Pre/Post perception data showed increases to all questions. “I believe that coming to school will help me be successful” showed an increase of 3.68 to 4.24. “I believe that setting goals can help improve my attendance” showed an increase of 3.08 to 3.88. “I know what I’m doing well and what I need to work on to improve” showed an increase of 2.88 to 4.25. “I have a plan to improve my attendance” showed an increase of 2.77 to 4.21. Outcome data showed that the number of students in grades 3-5 with 15 or more absences decreased from 99 (16-17) to 74 (17-18); a 25% decrease! It seemed that having more awareness of our attendance and creating goals to improve had a positive effect on our students. We’ll continue to find ways to improve our student attendance rate.

Caring Coupons (February 2018)
Reducing the number of behavior referrals in the classroom was another priority and we decided to deliver this lesson to our 3 grade classes (102 students), which annually has the highest amount of behavior referrals amongst grade levels. Pre/Post perception data showed increases to all questions. “Doing caring acts to my classmates can help us get along” showed an increase of 3.73 to 4.52. “I know what kind of caring acts my classmates like” showed an increase of 2.99 to 4.31. “I know what kind of caring acts my teacher likes” showed an increase of 3.04 to 4.95. “I know how to use caring coupons to show I care” showed an increase of 2.42 to 4.48. Outcome data showed the number of classroom referrals decreased from 50 referrals (16-17) to 23 referrals (17-18); a decrease of 46%! But in looking closer, 13 of the 23 classroom referrals (56% of total classroom referrals) took place in 3rd grade. Based on perception data, it seemed the students showed they gained knowledge and skills about showing caring acts towards students and adults. Although we made great strides school wide, we will look into alternative lessons that may produce more positive results or collaborate with teachers about lessons that could address improving classroom behaviors.


Based on the results of the lessons presented, decisions and/or recommendations need to be made. We will be reflecting on the lessons we implemented to determine if the lessons has a positive effect on data regardless of how the students liked the lesson. Even if students had “fun” with the lesson, if it does not show positive steps towards improving outcome data then it has to be relooked or replaced. We will also be discussing the times we implement lessons and keep in mind that April and May is our statewide assessment for grades 3-5 and that we may need to decide on doing our lessons earlier so that it won’t get cancelled. Anti-bullying or conflict resolution lessons may be more suited to be delivered during the second semester when behavior referrals occur more frequently.

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

Lesson #1
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Conflict Resolution |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
5 Peaceful Solutions Social Emotional: B-SS 9, B-SS5
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
Sept. 5-15 135 students in grade 5 1) "I believe that it is important to report verbal or physical incidents to an adult" moved from 44% reporting unsure or disagree to 95% reporting agree or strongly agree.

2) "I know three adults I can see to report incidents" moved from 76% reporting unsure or disagree to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.

3) "I know how to help a student that was harmed verbally or physically" moved from 77% reporting unsure or disagree to 89% reporting agree or strongly agree.

4) "I know how to resolve conflicts in a peaceful manner" moved from 56% reporting unsure or disagree to 90% reporting agree or strongly agree.
There were 20 behavior referrals for 5th grade during the 17-18 school year compared to 21 when the students were in 4th grade. The breakdown of referrals by quarter were: 1st qtr- 2, 2nd qtr- 0, 3rd qtr- 8, 4th qtr- 10. Based on the data, although it was great that the lesson done in September helped to keep the referrals low in 1st and 2nd qtr, but was not sustained in 3rd and 4th qtr. Due to our guidance curriculum covering pillars traits, we did not have a follow up lesson to remind students about dealing with situations peacefully. In the future, we will be looking at our guidance curriculum to find a balance between character education and expanding with other lessons that may be needed depending on the time of year.

Attached Files:
Lesson #2
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Attendance |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
3-5 Goals to Improve Attendance Academic, Career, Social/ Emotional: B-SMS 5, B-SMS1
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
Nov. 6-16 400 students in grades 3-5. 150 students were random sampled (2 classes in grades 3-5)

1) "I believe that coming to school will help me be successful" moved from 40% reporting unsure or disagree to 90% reporting agree or strongly agree.

2) "I believe that setting goals can help improve my attendance" moved from 68% reporting unsure or disagree to 71% reporting agree or strongly agree.

3) "I know what I'm doing well and what I need to work on to improve" moved from 77% reporting unsure or disagree to 82% reporting agree or strongly agree.

4) "I have a plan to improve my attendance" moved from 73% reporting unsure or disagree to 83% reporting agree or strongly agree.
The number of students in grades 3-5 with 15 or more absences decreased from 99 students (2016-17) to 74 students (2017-18). A 25% decrease! Improving our student attendance was one of our top priorities this past school year. This guidance lesson helped the students realize that setting goals to improve attendance can not only be effective, but fun as well. In the future, we will continue to focus on attendance and build on what we have implemented with other types of interventions (incentives, community outreach, support services for families etc.)

Attached Files:
  • Perception Data Chart (Goals To Improve Attendance) View | Download
  • Pre and Post Test (Goals To Improve Attendance) View | Download
Lesson #3
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Character Education |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
3 Caring Coupons Social/ Emotional: B-SS 2, B- SS 1, B-SMS 1
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
February 2018 102 students in grade 3.

1) "I believe that doing caring acts to my classmates can help us get along" moved from 66% reporting agree to 94% reporting agree or strongly agree.

2) "I know what kind of caring acts my classmates like" moved from 92% reporting unsure or disagree to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.

3) "I know what kind of caring acts my teacher likes" moved from 77% reporting unsure or disagree to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.

4) "I know how to use caring coupons to show I care" moved from 95% reporting unsure or disagree to 96% reporting agree or strongly agree.
The number of classroom referrals have decreased from 50 referrals (16-17) to 23 referrals (17-18), a decrease of 46%!

Although great news, in looking closer, 3rd grade had 13 of the 23 classroom referrals (56% of all classroom referrals).
In this situation our perception data showed that the students gained knowledge and skill through the pre and post test. But the outcome data was not reflective of that. Typically, 3rd grade has the highest or 2nd highest number of referrals. Therefore we will continue to find ways to support the behaviors of our 3rd graders in and out of the classroom setting.

Attached Files:
Are the 3 lessons submitted part of the same unit? No

10. Small-Group Responsive Services:
Our small groups action plan reflects the unique needs of our school. Based on our behavior referral data, the two highest locations has been the playground and classroom and the groups we have created is reflected on helping students work on skills that teaches appropriate behaviors. The developmental needs of the students are considered when creating our counseling groups. For example, counseling groups for grades K & 1 is focused on building friendships and learning playground safety skills. Our 5th grade student groups range between anger management, social skills, peer pressure, and attendance groups. Currently, the groups are created and refer to the ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors to match it. In the future, we will be looking at the ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors Program Planning Tool to determine groups to make based on the Mindsets and Behaviors we want to teach.


The lesson plans for the small group we are highlighting has been driven by the ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors. Our peer pressure group (8 students) was created to assist students that had difficulty with decision making, self-control, and displaying social maturity appropriate to the situation (B-LS1, B-SMS 2, B-SS9). Perception data showed positive increases from pre to post tests. For example, there was a score increase of 3.5 to 5 for the statement “I believe that friends can put pressure on me to act a certain way”. There also was a score increase of 2.5 to 5 for the statement “I have a plan to deal with negative peer pressure”.

The results report not only showed positive score increases in all questions on the pre and post test, but outcome data showed that the 8 groups members were involved in 0 behavior referrals in 4th quarter compared to 7 referrals in 3rd quarter. The timing of the group was made as it was an attempt to prevent these students from engaging in future incidents. In addition, there was buy in as they were informed that any additional incident could result in not participating in end of year incentives. Therefore, we will be continuing with this peer pressure group as 5th grade seems to be the age where students have difficulty with balancing what is right and wrong versus how they want to be viewed by their friends.


Attached Files:

Small-Group Results Report

Group Name: Peer Pressure Group
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues |
Goal: By the end of 4th quarter, there will be a 70% decrease in behavior referrals with 8 identified students in 5th grade from 7 referrals (3rd quarter) to 2 referrals (4th quarter).
Target Group: Identified students in 5th grade (5 girls and 3 boys)
Data Used to Identify Students: In the 3rd quarter, 6 of the 8 behavior referrals in 5th grade involved 8 students who have repeatedly gotten involved in situations where they made inappropriate choices and were unable to deal with peer pressure.
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Outline of Group Sessions Delivered
Dane Matsunaga Domain:
Social/Emotional

B- LS 1
B- SMS 2
B- SS 9
1. Give pre-test and discuss the differences between aquaintances, every day friends, and close friends; and how they may influence us ("Different Types of Friends").
2. Discuss that fitting in with a group is an important skill, as long as you choose the right group of friends ("Fitting In").
3. Discuss the difference between negative and positive peer pressure ("How To Say No").
4. Discuss that sometimes you have to stand up and be a leader by not always following the group ("Following The Right Leader").
5. Discuss that the way you behave can be seen by everyone ("Who Is Watching You"). Finish with giving post-test and reflection.
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
8 students (5 girls & 3 boys)



1) "I believe that friends can put pressure on me to behave a certain way" moved from 50% agree to 100% reporting strongly agree.


2) "I know the difference between positive and negative peer pressure" moved from 75% reporting unsure to 100% reporting strongly agree.


3) "I know how to be a positive influence for others" moved from 50% reporting unsure to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.

4) "I have a plan to deal with negative peer pressure" moved from 100% reporting unsure or disagree to 100% reporting strongly agree.
At the end of 4th quarter (after the conclusion of the counseling group), there was 0 referrals involving the identified students (100% decrease) compared with 7 referrals involving the identified students (12 students) in 3rd quarter. We were pleased with the effectiveness of the group. At the time the group was initiated, they had been involved in numerous behavior referrals. Although the group was created as a reactive step, it provided these students a last chance to change before getting year end incentives taken away. This created buy in for the students and they followed through with the commitment to change their behavior. This may not work for every group, but we are hopeful that with each group, the students get motivated to learn new skills and make changes to improve behavior.

11. Closing-the-Gap Results Report:
Goal: There will be a 20% decrease in the number of students in 5th grade with 15 or more absences from 36 students (16-17) to 29 students (17-18).
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Attendance |
Target Group: 36 5th grade students that had 15 or more absences the year before (16-17).
Data Used to Identify Students: Attendance Report from State Database (16-17 school year).
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Type of Activities to be Delivered in What Manner?
Dane Matsunaga M 3, B-SMS 5, B-SMS 1 Core curriculum guidance, Individual counseling, group counseling, check in/ check out system, reward system for targeted students, consultation with teachers, consultation with social worker, home visits as needed, and communication sheets between school and home.
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
36 selected 5th grade students with 15 or more absences the previous year. 1) "I believe coming to school is important" moved from 47% to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.

2) "I know how many absences that makes a student chronically absent" moved from 75% reporting disagree or strongly disagree to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.

3) "I know how to get to school on time" moved from 55% to 92% reporting agree or strongly agree.

4) "I have a plan that will improve my attendance" moved from 58% reporting disagree or strongly disagree to 100% reporting agree or strongly agree.
The number of students we targeted, who had 15+ absences the year before, dropped from 36 to 27. A decrease of of 25%! This group of current 5th graders with 15 or more absences the year before (4th grade) was the largest group of across grade levels and wanted to implement some interventions to see if it would work. The attendance group seemed to have a positive effect. Next year, our counseling department will expand and create more attendance groups amongst grades 3-5 in hopes of getting the same type of success.

Attached Files:The gap was identified through our year-end attendance report from our state database called Infinite Campus (16-17). In looking at our data, it showed that 4th grade had the highest number of students with 15 or more absences (36 students). The second highest was a tie between 5th grade and Kindergarten. With 5th grade moving on to middle school and Kindergarten having other factors for absences (parents keeping home if sick), we decided to target the 4th grade class as they enter 5th grade for the 2017-18 school year.

The interventions chosen for this target group included some interventions that were implemented school wide (attendance incentives, core curriculum guidance), while other interventions were created for this target group. We placed the targeted students in groups to ask what were some reasons for their attendance problems last year. Through participation in the group, they all felt comfortable to share their story. The reasons for their absenteeism had range of different reasons from taking care of younger siblings, parent passing away, sibling having cancer, and difficulties waking up. This painted a clearer picture to each student and had a better understanding of where they were coming from. We also implemented a special reward system for each student if they improved their attendance. For example, if the students come to school for the entire week, they receive a weekly incentive which could range from snacks, extra recess, and no homework pass. We also conducted individual counseling sessions and check in/check out system to help with progress monitoring. The resource that we used for our individual and group lesson were “Coming To School Is Really Cool” by Sandy Ragona & Stefani Weber. In addition, we had regular consultation with teachers, used communication sheets between school and home, and did home visits as needed.

Our perception data from our pre/post test (Liekert scale) showed significant increases in two of the statements we asked. “I know how many absences makes a student chronically absent” showed an increased score from 1.77 to 5. “I have a plan that will improve my attendance” showed an increased score from 2.19 to 5. Seeing those results were great, but the true test was to see if the perception data would have a positive effect on our outcome data. Our outcome data showed that our target group of 5th graders had only 27 students that were chronically absent compared to 36 the year before, a decrease of 25%! Our goal was to have a decrease of 20%, so we were very pleased with the results.

The data is helping us determine our next steps regarding attendance. Our administration was pleased with the results of our attendance groups and has asked if we could implement it with the other grades. We are also looking into other incentives to help encourage our students to come to school. The data is also helping us make decisions about which interventions we will continue or discontinue. For example, our weekly attendance reports have showed that when we had school wide spirit weeks, there was an increase of 1-2% (around 10-20 students) in our attendance rates for that week and the following week. Because of our data tracking, we realized the importance of how conducting spirit weeks at our school can do to encourage our students to come to school.

12. Program Evaluation Reflection:By implementing the ASCA National Model, our school’s comprehensive school counseling program has used leadership to create systemic change. We presented our annual agreement with administration and discussed the school counseling goals and detailing each school counselor’s responsibilities. This laid the framework and understanding of our roles in how we were going to implement our program, use our time, and spend our resources. The creation of our advisory council as given us an opportunity to communicate with stakeholders about our program and how it is being implemented. By providing direct services to our students and collaborating with parents, teachers, and staff, we have shown our stance in promoting a positive and safe school climate. And finally, we lead by example by regularly evaluating our counseling program through data to determine areas of strength as well as areas of growth.

Our school counseling program has used advocacy to create systemic change. By being a part of our school’s Academic Review Team process, we have collaborated with administration and other key members of our faculty to work on a plan to address some of our attendance concerns. One of our resource teachers is working on a grant to get community support in providing incentives that students and their families can earn for good attendance. Attendance was a concern also shared with the Academic Review Team. Data identified 2 areas of concern; the playground and the classroom. Based on that information plans have been created to address the areas of concern. Starting this school year, we have revised the lunch recess schedule to have one grade level out at lunch recess instead of two, which will result in a decreased adult to student ratio of 1 to 38 students compared with 1 to 50 students. We are also working on improving the classroom environment by consulting with teachers on finding ways to improve the relationship between teacher and student. During the first week of school, teachers have created goals on what they would like to accomplish towards creating a positive environment.

Our school counseling program has used collaboration to create systemic change. Based on data sharing with our administration, they allowed the counseling department to run a professional development day to inform our classroom teachers about our behavior referral data and get their input on how we can decrease the amount of referrals from the playground and the classroom. In addition, administration has asked us to run a faculty meeting to present information and strategies on how to address bullying and harassment. In another example of collaboration, the counseling department and administration has collaborated with key staff members including custodians, cafeteria workers, teachers, and adult supervisors about changing the lunch recess procedures to have one grade level out instead of two. This was important to get the key staff members buy in so that we could make it possible to implement. Factors that had to be considered was time of lunch serving for each grade, line up procedures, seating procedures in the cafeteria, providing proper supervision in the café and playground, and clean up time after the last grade level comes in to eat lunch. We are hoping these changes will result in a decrease in behavior referrals in both the classroom and the playground.




Systemic change does not happen quickly, but the counseling department is taking steps toward making small changes in hopes that it will lead to larger changes in the future. For example, it was shared during our advisory council meeting that students felt that the basketball courts were overly crowded and it could be a factor in some behavior referrals. With the new lunch recess procedure changes this school year, we are hoping that having fewer students on the basketball court will result in a decrease in referrals on the playground/courts. Also, in looking at our attendance data, it has shown that when we put an increased awareness to improving attendance, there was a positive effect. We will be continuing to find strategies to help lower our percentage of students that are chronically absent.

By going through our RAMP journey, we are finding that our school counseling program can create change. No matter how small the change, we will keep making improvements in hopes that it could lead to bigger changes in the future. We are gaining confidence in ourselves as we become more comfortable and knowledgeable about using data and it will show our stakeholders (administration, staff, parents, community) that we can make a difference in impacting student achievement, attendance, and behavior.

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