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RAMP Application

School Information

Our school has received the RAMP designation previously and is applying to Re-Ramp: No
Have you or another counselor(s) in your school received formal, in person training or coaching on the ASCA National Model or RAMP in the past two years?:
Does your school receive funds from the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program?: No
School Name: Avaxat Elementary School
School Address: 24300 Las Brisas Road San Diego ,
School District Name: Murrieta Valley Unified
School Twitter Handle:
School year RAMP application represents: 2017-2018
Number of students in district: 23000
Grade Category: e
Grade levels served at school: 6
Number of students at school: 715
Number of certified staff at school: 42
Number of Full-time school counselors at school: 1
Number of Part-time school counselors at school: 0
Average number of students served by each school counselor: 700
School setting: Suburban
Percentage of students identified as special education students: 16.2%
Percentage of students who receive free or reduced lunch: 66%

Percent Black: 5
Percent Hispanic: 52
Percent White: 28
Percent Native American: 1
Percent Asian: 3
Percent Other: 10

Names of other school counselors at school:
Felipe Zanartu

Names of other personnel:
Ocean Walker (Assistant Principal) Howard Dimler (Director of Student Support)

Written Portions and File Attachments

1. Vision Statement
School Counseling Program Vision Statement:
Avaxat Elementary School Counseling Department Vision Statement

Every student who passes through the doors of Avaxat Elementary will complete their K-12 education with academic and social emotional skills that prepare them to be college and career ready! All students will be prepared to take on the challenges and expectations of the diverse and complex 21st century, becoming positive productive citizens in a global society.

School Counseling Program Beliefs:
School Counselors at Avaxat Elementary believe…
-All students are capable of success, when a data-driven comprehensive school counseling program is in place
-Every student has the right to learn in a safe and respectful supportive environment
-Students learn in a variety of ways and styles
-All students have equitable access to a comprehensive school counseling program administer by a certified school counselor
-School Counselors collaborate with stakeholders and community resources to meet student needs
-The School Counselor will participate in professional development activities essential to maintaining a quality school counseling program
-School Counselors will abide by the professional school counseling ethics advocated by the American School Counseling Association (ASCA)

School Vision Statement:
Avaxat Elementary School Vision

Prepare all learners to achieve their dreams.

District Vision Statement:
Murrieta Valley Unified School District Vision

District does not currently have a vision statement however has beliefs, focus, and strategic directions listed (See Attached)

Narrative: Development of the School Counseling Vision
The process for developing the vision statement began by first reviewing and reflecting my own beliefs as well as reviewing the belief/vision statements of our school and school district for alignment. Being the sole counselor at my school, I consulted with our district team of counselors, various stakeholders in my school as well as our school counseling advisory council for input. Common elements which emerged included an emphasis on achievement, college and career readiness, and social emotional learning. The vision statement is aligned with the state and county vision for students. Although our district does not have a current vision statement we aligned our vision to similar document entitled “Beliefs, Focus, and Strategic Directions” (See Attached).

The vision statement paints a picture of future success for all students, who will be recent high school and college graduates within the next ten to fifteen years. We envision a future world where students will be prepared for challenges of the 21st century as well as a global society, as a result of being involved with our comprehensive school counseling program. When students return to Avaxat as former students and/or as parents, the school counseling program seeks to have developed young adults with the ability to overcome learning barriers, show empathy and demonstrate problem-solving skills in the greater Murrieta-Temecula area. This is a vision that is future focused; however, it is inspired in part by the reports we currently hear from our graduates who have come back to share how meaningful our work has already been for them.

How do the beliefs influence the vision of the school counseling program?
The influence our beliefs had on the development of our vision statement is evident as it describes a picture of students as capable, successful, and engaged. A key example is the belief that "all students are capable of success..." This perspective drove the development of the vision, which is supported by providing a comprehensive school counseling program, making sure that relevant support systems were in place, and having high expectations.

In the process of developing our beliefs statements, I pondered some of the following: How do we want students to remember us, a question the school regularly asks the students to reflect on? Does the school counselor role within the program truly foster success for students not only Kindergarten through 5th grade, but through grade 12 and beyond? Are we driven by data to inform program decisions to meet the needs of all students? Do we constantly utilize stakeholders to help adapt and influence the direction of planning, management, delivery and evaluation of the counseling program? Additionally, the ASCA National Model, 3rd edition, provided a useful activity (See attached) for solidifying my beliefs statements. I developed supporting statements that addressed why that belief was important to students, the program and what actions a school counselor would do to ensure this was central to the program.

A vision that drives the school counseling program:
Our vision statement drives our school counseling program in everything we do. It guides the work we do, which in turn influences the direction of the program. Because one’s beliefs are so important, being able to understand and communicate them is crucial in our work as counselors. When collaborating with fieldwork students, I often refer to the metaphor of an “elevator speech,” meaning articulating what you do in a concise and but rich manner within about a minute. This becomes helpful in collaboration with stakeholders at the site, and within the community. The vision and beliefs form the foundation for our program, as they build a narrative about what school counselors will accomplish with students. As an individual school counselor at my site, I know that my beliefs influence the development of my program and my interaction with students and all stakeholders.

Attached Files:
2. Mission Statement:
School Mission Statement: Avaxat Elementary School (AES) Mission Statement We will provide an extraordinary, standards based education with an emphasis on cultivating each student's academic, emotional and social potential. Academic -Developing critical thinkers -Implementing Differential instruction -Exploring technology as a bridge to the future Emotional -Nurturing Compassion -Fostering respect for each other and the environment -Encouraging Self-Reflection Social -Promoting cooperation and Kindness -Communication effectively -Building TRRFFCC (Character Counts) Kids

School Counseling Mission Statement: The mission of the Avaxat School Counseling Program is to provide a comprehensive, data driven school counseling program that will educate and empower students to achieve academic success, develop life skills to become life-long learners, creative thinkers, and become responsible community members in a diverse changing world. We work with students and families to identify barriers to learning to ensure equity and access for all students. We are school counselors committed to serving each child so they can achieve their greatest potential every day, No exceptions!
 Our School Counseling Program mission is aligned with and supports the mission of Avaxat Elementary school and the Murrieta Valley Unified School District.

Narrative:
Mission Development Process: Connection to District’s Mission Statement
All district school counselors had the opportunity to come together during a daylong brainstorming session and discuss our beliefs and thoughts about students. During our district meeting, we had representation from elementary, middle, and high school counselors representing all 19 schools in the district. Each school counselor shared his or her insight regarding beliefs about students, how they learn, and the barriers that they face as they move from Kindergarten to 12th grade.
The dominant theme that came out of discussions was a commitment to impact students so they are prepared for college and or other careers. Students are able to do this when they have access to not only to a rigorous academic program, but also to academic, career and social emotional support, which would remove learning barriers. This learning extends beyond individual, group, or tier I support by using stakeholders as partners in the process. All students at Murrieta Valley Unified have access to a comprehensive student assistance program, counselors at each site TK-12 and emerging partnerships including community mental health, business and colleges in southwestern Riverside County and Northern San Diego County. In creating a mission statement for my school, I worked to align with the final district school counseling mission statement (See attached).

Mission Development Process: Themes at the School Site level
At my elementary school, I tailored our school’s school counseling mission with the spirit of the district’s mission, transforming it to meet the needs of my population. At my elementary site, the school counseling program is comprised of one counselor. In development of the mission statement I collaborated with my administration, site staff and a fieldwork student to generate themes that are relevant to our small school. Important pieces of our school include: developing lifelong learners, a community of responsible students, equity and access to learning and a social emotional environment where all students achieve at their greatest potential. The finalized statement was presented to our school counselor advisory council for advice and consent.

Equity, Access and Success for Each Student, No Exceptions!
Our school believes deeply in ensuring that every student has access to not only a rigorous academic curriculum, but to a comprehensive school counseling program. I say, “No Exceptions!” because our program believes that ALL students can achieve their greatest potential when they have the opportunities to succeed. This extends from our highest performing students to those that may struggle more than others. All students, regardless of their situation, deserve to attend a school that meets their academic, emotional and social needs. The school counseling program strives to deliver a developmentally appropriate comprehensive school counseling program that ensures success for all.

Long Range results.
Our school is but one-step on the educational journey through the Murrieta Valley School District. One way to identify learning barriers is by making decisions based on data. School counselors in Murrieta Valley analyze behavior, academic, and attendance data regularly to ensure all students are on track for success. Where there are gaps, the school counselor intervenes through a tiered model and tracks progress not only semester to semester but over the years. We are fortunate to be unified as a TK-12 district where elementary school counselors collaborate with middle and high school counselors to ensure progress made at one site transfers to the other. We do this via an annual articulation processes, vertical team meetings, and quarterly check-ins and collaborations. Ten to fifteen years in to the future, well after students have promoted from our school and graduated from our high schools, I expect to see students enrolling in community and four-year colleges in southern California. The school counselor will see students in the community, returning to share successes in postsecondary institutions and in their respective careers.

Attached Files:
3. School Counseling Program Goals:

Goal 1:
Goal #1 Academics: By the end of the 2017-2018 School Year, all students in 3rd through 5th grade will increase their proficiency in math (Meets Standard and Exceeds Standard) by 10% from 40% to 44% as measured by the fourth quarter Scholastic Math Assessment (SMI).

  • Academic Achievement
Goal 2:
Goal #2 Attendance: By the end of the 2017-2018 School Year, all students will decrease chronic absenteeism (absent more than 10% of the school year) by 5% from 6.9% to 5.5% as measured from data pulled from the Aeries Student Information System.



  • Attendance

Narrative:
The process of developing goals began by analyzing baseline data collected during the 2016-2017 school year. Goals were established in collaboration with the administration team, reviewing my own data as well as input from the advisory council. Annual goals are linked to the program’s mission and vision, mindsets and behaviors, and the site's Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) goals (See attached). Using the vision as a guide, we promote college and career readiness for all by removing barriers to learning allowing students to be prepared to take on the challenges of the 21st century. In development of goals, we strive to use data to address systemic “gaps” (e.g. proficiency rates) to ensure equity and access to a quality education.
Goal #1 (Academics) focuses on improving student learning in math for students in grades 3rd-5th Grade. For the past few years, our school had been making progress in reading scores but overall there was a large gap in Math. The goal was founded in data by analyzing the previous year's data and setting a realistic goal for progress. In the past year's data only 26% of students in 3rd Grade and 27% of students in 4th Grade ended the 2016-2017 school year proficient in math according to the scholastic math inventory, a benchmark test given quarterly district wide.
This goal was important to the school because the previous year’s numbers fell below the district average for math proficiency as well as with other cohorts of students at our own school. For example, our outgoing 5th graders achieved nearly double the proficiency 53% than the other two grade levels analyzed with about a third of the amount of behavior concerns. (See attached Chart)
To address the goal I took a tiered approach. First, I refocused the delivery of tier I lessons on emotion management and empathy to occur earlier in the year. I did this in anticipation of historic problem behavior. When students spend more focused time in the classroom, it is more likely they will learn. Additionally, I used data to target specific students in 3rd and 4th grade to participate in study skills groups focused on Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) strategies such as, note taking, organization, planning and progress monitoring. Outcome data from the 2017-2018 school year for students targeted indicated 52% of our 3rd-5th grade students met or exceeded the standard in Math this year. Our school exceeded the goal by raising math proficiency by 30% putting our students on track to be prepared to be college and career ready! 

Goal #2 (Attendance) addresses student learning by helping students access an appropriate educational curriculum. When students attend school more they will have positive academic success. Improving attendance is important to the school because this is both a site goal and district wide goal reflected through the LCAP (See Attached). In the 2016-2017 school year, 6.90% of students from K-5th Grade students were chronically absent, meaning they have missed over 10% of the school year. Although this rate of chronic absenteeism is higher than the district average of 5.5% in the elementary level during the 2016-2017 school year it had decreased drastically from previous years exceeding the LCAP goal of 8.2% for this current academic year. In order to achieve this goal, I implemented additional tier I activities to improve attendance such as class, grade level and individual incentives for attendance. Additionally, I collaborated with administration to intervene by offering individual and group support where necessary and participating in student attendance review team (SART) meetings.
Despite the efforts of our counseling and administration team, we were unable to overcome what became an epidemic in our district of the flu. This affected each site dramatically. As a result, attendance during the 2017-2018 school year for chronically absent students actually increased from the rate of 6.9% to 7.4% (7.5% increase in chronic absenteeism). This had an effect on every school in the district with not one school improving their chronic absentee numbers. To be able to impact this goal, I am planning on putting an emphasis on attendance in tier 1 lessons and deploying a new student valet program which gets students involved in school by helping out with morning traffic. I look forward to see how this may affect attendance in the future.


Supplemental Documents:
4. ASCA Student Standards Competencies and Indicators OR ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors for Student Success:

Attached Files:Narrative:
Mindsets and Behaviors Narrative
At Avaxat Elementary, the mindsets and behaviors planning tool is helpful in ensuring that I deliver services that meet the needs of all our students. The program implements these standards through the core curriculum classroom lessons, small group interventions and in “closing the gap” activities.
I was careful and intentional when selecting each of the standards, as one needs to look at the whole program to understand where they may fall. Every year the school counseling program revises the core curriculum action plan, small group responsive services and closing the gap activities to meet the program goals for the year. Integrated within that process is the question “What do we want our students to be learning?” For example, with our younger students in grades K-1 there is a large importance in getting connected to school (BSS:1,2), building classroom behavioral skills (BSMS:1,7), and social skills (BSS:4) because it ensures their success throughout their time here at Avaxat. Whereas, overcoming barriers to learning (BSMS:6) and social maturity (BSS:2) are more prevalent when we address topics of problem solving and bully prevention. The planning tool ensures that the material presented to students is aligned with the needs of our students.
This extends past tier I as I used the mindsets and behaviors to inform practices in small groups and closing the gap activities. One example would be the closing the gap activities where the goal was to improve learning outcomes for math. There are ten learning strategies and I chose specifically critical thinking (BLS:1) time management, organization and study skills (BLS:3) and identification of short and long term goals (BLS:7). These standards were integrated within the core lessons, Check-In Check-Out (a PBIS intervention) and progress monitoring which proved successful as we exceeded the goal!
Murrieta Unified District’s elementary counseling program has just one mandate when it comes to delivering programs. For elementary school counselors, the mandated program is a set of two to three lessons per grade level using the Second Step social emotional learning program and bullying prevention unit. In elementary counseling, the point is for all students to have a common understanding of skills regardless of which school they attend. Beyond the agreed upon lessons, counselors are granted the flexibility to implement more or provide different instruction to meet their student’s needs.

The Foundation of the Program
The standards and mindsets are one of the “behind the scenes” aspects of planning. Within the small group interventions and closing the gap activities they provide direction and purpose for the work we do. When consulting with teachers about barriers to learning often times they site needs for motivation to learn & learning coping skills related to problem solving and emotion management. These correlate directly to the ASCA behavior standards for self-management e.g. (2. Demonstrate self-discipline and self-control & 7. Demonstrate effective coping skills when faced with a problem.)
When I work to implement small group and closing the gap activities with students, I seek to help them skill build where they fall short in the classroom. The standards reflected in closing the gap activities include learning strategies such as 1. Demonstrate critical-thinking skills to make informed decisions, 3. Use time-management, organizational and study skills & 7. Identify long- and short-term academic, career and social/emotional goals. Utilizing the standards as a guide, I was able to select resources that assisted in achieving these standards such as the AVID curriculum and Skills for Student Success Curriculum.

A Process of evaluating and revising
At the beginning and the end of each year, I revisit, revise, review and evaluate whether I achieved the standards that I planned to meet. As I modify action plans (Core, Small Group and Closing the Gap), I constantly adjust which standards to implement during the course of the year. As we are a K-5 school, it is impossible nor expected to be able to accomplish all 35 standards for each domain as they are designed to impact the students from Pre-Kinder - 12th grade. At the elementary level, there is a higher emphasis on social emotional learning due to needs in supporting the development of the child. This is reflected through the mindsets and behaviors.

Supplemental Documents:
5. Annual Agreement:

Attached Files:Narrative:
Annual Agreement Narrative
Wrapping up the 2016-2017 school year, I reviewed the final data sets in the areas of attendance, behavior and academics to establish patterns and think about development of goals for the next academic school year. For the 2017-2018 school year, I was fortunate to have a school counseling fieldwork student from the prior year continue as an intern who would help support the work. In development of the Annual Agreement, I considered the school’s goals and the data that we collected in combination with ongoing discussions of how the school counselor supports the system with social emotional support and prevention. Every year I try to tailor my own program goals to the school’s goals and district’s goals. As mentioned in the goals section, this year’s focus was to be on improving math scores as in the previous school years we had made large improvements in reading, which is foundational these days to math. Our principal at the time was pleased with the number of tier I core lessons that I had been able to provide. The only change that we made was change the dates of core lessons, specific to emotion management to earlier dates, to better impact our students. Tier II also had been very successful, as we were using office referrals as well as perception data from our teachers to serve as qualifiers for small group counseling. We were seeing results year to year and with additional support from our fieldwork student, we were ready to start the 2017-2018 school year! Both administrators took a “continue what you are doing” approach to the annual agreement as we had shown improvement in attendance and reading the last few years.
In the middle of the summer, our principal announced that he had been promoted to a central office position and that we would be beginning the year in September with new leadership. On our new principal's first week on the job, I met with him and the current AP to present the annual agreement which included use of time, goals, as well as duties and special projects. Having a new administrator, it was my opportunity to present the comprehensive school counseling program in a concise meeting. The new principal took a “laissez-faire” approach to our meeting and was supportive of our agreement. No suggestions were given to amend the agreement that was made in May.
Use of Time
Although there is a use of time assessment available in the ASCA Implementation book, for the last seven years I have used my own excel version, known as a Time Tracker, which calculates by half hour and gives a summary over a 10-week period of one’s use of time. I reviewed the previous year’s annual agreement targets which were the same as for this year. After reviewing the data from the time tracker (Attached), it was clear that I had been within 3 points of all my goals with the exception of core curriculum. In discussions with the admin, they supported me in seeking to maintain the goals for use of time. I seek to use my time as recommended by the ASCA National Model suggestion of 80%/20% time ratio of direct and indirect services.
When reviewing the annual agreement, we established specific targets for our direct services: 40% would be dedicated towards core curriculum (e.g. lessons), 15% for individual student planning (e.g. meeting one on one with students), and 15% for responsive services (e.g. supporting immediate needs of students and providing targeted interventions. 10% of time would be used for Indirect Services, which would incorporate our work with referrals, consultation and collaboration with teachers, administration, parents, school staff and community stakeholders. The remaining 20% would be dedicated to program management, which includes day-to-day tasks for operation of the program, data analysis, professional development and fair-share duties.
School Counselor Duties
Management of duties for the school counseling program falls solely on me, as I am the only school counselor at this site. Additional tasks included delivery of daily social skill videos through the morning announcements as well as coordination of our PBIS team. I addressed responsibilities our fieldworker (intern) would have during her time here. She was assigned a focus on 2nd and 3rd grade classroom lessons with my supervision and would include two units of second step lessons as well as support in small group and individual counseling. In addition, we had support from our office manager with calendaring, basic clerical support and triaging phone calls.

6. Advisory Council:

Attached Files:Advisory Council Members and Stakeholder Positions:
Name Title
Felipe Zanartu School Counselor
Joe Parla Principal
Twila Kelly-Van Ramshorst Assistant Principal
Dean Lesicko District Admin
Ben Wallace Teacher/Parent
Lynn Torres Teacher/Parent
Terry Gavitt Teacher
Danica Rosendale Teacher
Nancy Grenier Teacher
Ed Vazquez Resource Officer
Angie Brown Parent
Jessika Briceno Munoz Parent
Faith Sands Parent
Logan Brown Student
Connor Brown Student
Luis Malara Manager Subway
Matthew Smaby Manager Stater Bros

Narrative:
Advisory Council Narrative
The Avaxat School Counseling Program was established to create transparency, make outreach and ensure that stakeholders have an input. It is a forum for students, parents, teachers, and administrators to give feedback as well as participate in the on-going development of the school counseling program. Having an advisory council in place allows me to better serve my students by hearing directly from stakeholders about what we do well, where we can improve and to hear new ideas!

Development of the Team
When I developed the advisory council, I wanted to pull from a variety of stakeholders. I hand selected teachers from various grade levels to be able to share an accurate pulse on the campus. I looked for input from parents who were involved in the parent-teacher organization as they had a good idea of what day to day campus life is like. I enrolled two 5th grade students who had been at the school since kindergarten. I gathered district personnel such as our coordinator of student support and our school resource officer. Finally, I invited our admin team to sit in as well. I did invite a few community partners including the manager from Subway and the local Stater Bros, which partners with the program to do a career field trip. Unfortunately, they were not able to attend. The members of the advisory council comprise a comprehensive point of view of the school which makes it helpful when soliciting feedback.

Fall Meeting Input & Discussion
In October of 2017 I held the first School Counseling Advisory Committee Meeting of the year. The meeting began by reviewing the purpose of the advisory council for the academic school year. For this first meeting, details about the ASCA national model program were shared (see PowerPoint). I reviewed key components of the school counseling program including Goals, the core curriculum action plan, small groups, and individualized support for students. Members of the advisory council were impressed by the program and gave feedback that more parent outreach would be helpful so parents could access the program. The members liked the topics of the lessons and they wanted to know how they could implement these lessons at home with their children. I took those comments into account and am working on implementing more advertising and emails to parents over the course of the year. Currently there is a brochure, website, newsletter and recap videos of lessons.

Spring Meeting Input & Discussion
This second meeting was focused on reviewing results of the program over the course of the school year (See PowerPoint). We began with purpose and new programs including the student valet program. We shared successes in core curriculum. Members liked the lessons but did add that it would be helpful to talk more about technology and the role it plays in relationships (cyberbullying). Results were shared in small groups. The counsel was happy with the groups that are available for students. One of the teachers gave feedback that some of the data may look better during the next school year as students are going through a new evaluation tool. We also addressed annual events like the great kindness challenge and the resurgence of Friday flag. Finally, we discussed plans for the next year. We introduced a shift in how we will be qualifying students for small group with the intention of being more focused on each skill for the child. We also discussed the county and district push for college with the RCOE College kick off campaign.

Incorporation of Feedback
Overall over the two meetings we were able to present and get great feedback on what we needed to better; namely outreach & specific lessons related to issues pertinent to students and families. This year and during the following school year we are incorporating the suggestions in core and intentional guidance curriculum, so we can meet the needs of all students so they are prepared to take on all the challenges of the 21st century.


7. Calendars:

Attached Files:Narrative:
Development of Annual and Weekly Calendars
The Annual Calendar is informed by our school’s needs and priorities, and reflects priorities set by the district counseling team’s master calendar and district and school-wide schedules. The district counseling team determines core curriculum Tier 1 lessons (e.g., Second Step), district wide counseling activities (e.g. Great Kindness Challenge), and regular counseling meetings to be incorporated in each school’s action plan.
I began developing my annual calendar towards the end of the prior year, as I evaluate that year’s activities and develop my core curriculum action plan. My core curriculum action plan calls for three to four units per grade level delivered in three rounds of core lessons, I blocked over ten weeks during the year to cover groups in the fall and spring. The remaining time is dedicated for closing the gap activities, individual student planning, responsive services, and program management.
As the school year begins, I finalize the calendar, looking at the district and school’s master calendar and other school-wide calendars (e.g., intervention, computer lab) to avoid conflicts. I also input all pre- planned meetings and professional development activities (e.g. weekly admin meetings, regular counseling meetings, conferences and school site meetings).
The annual calendar informs the Weekly Calendars, which provides details of activities two to three weeks in advance. With small groups or individual students, I label the time slot for group counseling/individual, omitting identifying information to protect confidentiality. In addition, I send staff online invitations for activities such as core lessons as reminders.
The two weekly calendars I submitted demonstrate how I divide time over the course of the year. In the fall, after delivering about one third of my core lessons, I develop small group counseling, addressing the needs of students needing more support. These groups support my program goals (academic development in math, and attendance as well as behavior concerns) found in data/referrals as well as any additional student needs (e.g., family death; anxiety). The spring calendar reflects my time management with events and crises, using my flexible time on Mondays for essential rescheduling. My time analysis demonstrates that I was able to meet the ASCA recommended goal of 80/20 for Direct/Indirect Services.

Identifying Priorities
Establishing priorities and calendaring activities in relation to those priorities allows me to accomplish my goals. They evolve as I evaluate what worked and what could be improved from my prior year, and in determining school-wide needs. Core classroom lessons, small groups, and collaboration time take priority. Planning each of these activities assures I can demonstrate to all stakeholders how my use of time supports the school’s mission: cultivating every student’s academic emotional and social potential!

Collaborative Conversations between School Counselor, Administrators and Other Staff
Collaboration is essential to our success. During our fall annual agreement meeting, the school counselor, AP, and principal look at the annual calendars and discuss Tier 1 and 2 activities in relationship to program and school goals. Standing administration-counselor meetings occur each Monday morning to review and if necessary to revise. At the beginning of the school year I meet with teachers by grade level to review the action plan, solicit input and discuss how it meets student needs. We then negotiate the timing of classroom lessons in relation to their other schedules.

Sharing annual and weekly calendars with stakeholders
As soon as calendars are developed, I share them with in-house stakeholders through Outlook. All teachers are aware of the counseling calendars and receive regular updates about meeting times for Tier I and Tier II activities. I post a more general calendar on the counselor webpage. All administrators and our office manager have access to details of the calendar as we interact and plan together. I also discuss the schedule with the advisory council at the end of the year, informing adjustments for the next academic year.

Adjustments
To accommodate needed adjustments, such as those that arise when responsive services are needed from the counselor, Mondays are left open for follow up with students, rescheduling lessons, and for collaboration with stakeholders. For example, when an immediate concern with a student requiring my assistance occurs, I reschedule pre-planned aspects of the program to Monday. In addition, I may add or adjust lessons due to systems issues on campus. For example, I added a cyber safety lesson in collaboration with my fifth-grade team in response to an increase in cyberbullying incidents. This has ensured I have the flexibility to meet emergencies while being true to my prioritized program.

8. School Counseling Core Curriculum Action Plan and Lessons Plans:

Attached Files:Narrative:
School Counseling Core Curriculum Narrative

ASCA Foundation Developing the Curriculum Action Plan
The school counseling program is built on a foundation that aligns with our mission, vision and program goals. When developing the core curriculum action plan, I wanted to assure that activities delivered supported all students. The implementation of tier I activities is designed through the three domains (academic, social/emotional & career) to support the vision that all students are college and career ready. Furthermore, lessons are organized to be developmentally appropriate, based on data, and grounded in the mindsets and behaviors in order to support our mission of educating and empowering students to be lifelong learners achieving at their highest potential.
The action plan supports the mission by providing students with lessons that empower them to achieve academic success. In their educational journey they will be exposed to various life skills to become life-long learners, creative thinkers, and responsible community members. Lesson topics I have implemented include learning skills to form a foundation of their learning, empathy skills to help them be better citizens and friends, emotion management skills allowing them to cope through life’s problems and problem-solving skills to help them through academic and personal conflict.
These core curriculum lessons support our two program goals of improving chronic absenteeism & improving math scores. When students attend school with the attitudes, knowledge, and skills to make them successful both in and outside of the classroom, they will be here more often and ready to learn.

Development of the Action Plan
When developing the action plan, there were a few considerations to plan around. Our elementary team plans certain core curriculum lessons that occur throughout the district to ensure that all students in the greater Murrieta Valley get access to the same social emotional curriculum (See Rain Supports). The vast majority of lessons come from the Second Step Curriculum. When planning the lessons as a group, we take into consideration the developmental needs of students and district-wide data reflecting the needs. Each counselor then plans site specific action plans to meet the goals and the needs of each site.
For the last three years, I wanted to ensure there were regular lessons that also supported college and career readiness through exposure. I collaborated with 2nd and 5th grade teachers to develop a unit on college and career readiness, which culminated in a field trip. This along with the second step lessons help ensure that a student would be exposed to all three domains of counseling.
Program goals are also taken to consideration as I plan the lessons. This year I put a focus on improvements in attendance and in math scores. I focused on creating a positive climate with an emphasis on empathy, emotion management and bully prevention skills, which aim to remove learning barriers to support attendance and academics. Mindsets and behaviors were analyzed in the process to ensure students were getting a healthy dose of self-management, learning strategies and social skills to be successful.

Delivery of lessons, adjustments and modifications
The action plan called for approximately 77 total lessons throughout the grades. Each grade varied from 3-6 teachers per grade level. To ensure delivery to all students I implemented lessons in each grade level one week at a time (typically Tuesday - Friday). For example, the first week of school I delivered a 4-lesson unit of “Skills for Learning” to 1st grade, as the grade level had six teachers, I planned around their schedule to have six slots of time per day to accommodate the lessons. By the end of the week I had implemented the unit getting in the classroom 20 times. There are times throughout the year where certain additional lessons are added to support data driven or community needs of the school. For example, this year there was a need to add an additional lesson on cyberbullying and internet safety in response to incidents that were affecting a large amount of 5th graders at our school. Due to conditions on the campus there may be a need for me to get pulled for a crisis event, for that reason I keep my Monday calendar clear, so I can make up any missed lessons due to unforeseen circumstances.
This action plan was completed by delivering a total of seventy-seven different lessons. This was completed with the help of six incredible grade level teams that worked with me to collaborate to establish a solid tier I for all of our students.



9. School Counseling Core Curriculum: Results Report:
Core Counseling Results Report
Core curriculum lessons are a major component of the elementary school counseling program, as its reach extends to all. At Avaxat Elementary, the staff has generously given me access to classrooms to provide support regularly over the last 3 years. I have instructed well over 400 lessons per year! One highly successful unit, Empathy, gives students skills, which help them, interact with peers as well as trusted adults. By teaching the attitudes, knowledge, and skills of empathy and respect, we educate and empower students to achieve academic success, develop life skills, and become responsible community members.

Effectiveness of Core Curriculum Empathy Unit
In implementing a Tier I intervention, I always reflect back on the data from the previous year to determine the need. At the end of the 2016-2017 school year, multiple data points suggested that initial support for these students would be needed. By the end of the previous year, the 1st Grade group was one of the most challenging groups with 87 office referrals, the highest for the school. The largest referral category was “lack of citizenship skills” (67%) which teachers generally select when students have excessive low-level behavior issues with fellow students or teachers, which escalates to an office referral. For that reason, I chose to put special attention on working to have students build the empathy skills to build better relationships with their peers as well as their teachers.
Process Data. I adapted four lessons from the Second Step empathy unit (2nd Grade) to deliver to each class, delivering a total of 20 classroom lessons (4 lessons taught 5 times) to 109 students. I collaborated with 2nd grade teachers and my intern to create a relevant evaluation instrument, which would be appropriate to measure the student’s perceptions.
I aligned the pre/post-test with the objectives of the lessons as well as the mindsets and behaviors set in the lesson plan. In collaboration with teachers, I created an online pre/post test to enhance accessibility to teachers and students. We used pictures and read the questions to students to make the assessment accessible to struggling readers.
Perception Data. Several perception data points indicated positive results. The first was a large decrease in “needs improvement” on quarterly report cards. In fact, the number of negative behavior marks on report cards dropped by 45% from quarter one to quarter two. This teacher perception was an indicator that students and teachers were improving their relationships and that there was more learning occurring in the classroom. Second, immediate pre and post test results yielded positive results in student attitudes, knowledge, and skills required to be empathetic, which allows them to have supportive relationships with adults and students. 35% of students shifted their beliefs about other student’s preferences, 95% understood what compassion is, and 95% of students were able to make a good choice on a scenario question that asked them to take responsibility. By giving students positive examples about how leading with empathy and compassion would improve their relationships with others, I hypothesized that this would lead to fewer behavior incidents.
Outcome Data. Outcome data supported the effectiveness of this intervention. Over the first semester, office discipline referrals dropped by 57% and attendance Improved by 1% allowing. Students spent more time in the classroom learning. There were no changes in suspensions because there were none. As a result, by the end of the 1st quarter we saw a 2% growth in math scores. By the end of the 2017-2018 school year, this group of students went from being the highest referred group to the lowest, demonstrating a 65% decrease year to year!

Informing Future School Counseling Activities
The series of lessons on empathy was one of four different units delivered to second grade. After reviewing the success outcomes data, I look forward to using this unit regularly. The lessons could not have been successful without the support and collaboration of our teachers for relevance and appropriateness. In the future, the pre/post test questions will be modified to tie them more closely to the behavior. Two of the pictures seemed to be confusing to some students; thus, they will be replaced. Nevertheless, the lessons were very successful and I will continue to implement them with small adjustments to meet the needs of new students.

School Counseling Core Curriculum Results Report

Lesson #1
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | Character Education | Violence Prevention |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
2nd Grade  Empathy Unit 
 2. Respecting Preferences Category 1 Social Emotional Mindset Standards: (Mindset 2 Self-confidence in ability to succeed) Category 2 Social Emotional Behavior Standards: (Self-Management Skills 2 Demonstrate Self-Discipline and Self-Control) Category 2 Social Emotional Behavior Standards: (Social Skill 4 Demonstrate Empathy)
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
September 13th 109 Students
Attitudes
35% Decrease in students who believe that everyone should have the same preferences
(Pre 2.83 Post 1.83)

12% increase of students that believe it is important to have compassion for others
(Pre 3.42 Post 3.85)

15% Decrease in students who believe is someone bumps into them it was on purpose.
(Pre 1.95 Post 1.64)

Knowledge
38% increase in students who know what empathy means
(Pre 51% Post 70%)

23% increase in students know the definition of compassion.
(Pre 77% Post 95%)

Skills

15% increase in students who are able to take responsibility and apologize when they do something by accident.
(Pre 83% Post 95%)

Teacher Perceptions
In Work Habits and Social Skills the number of "needs improvement" grades was reduced by 45%
(From 35 to 19)
Data Reflects (Q1 Progress Report & Q2 Report Card)
Math Inventory (MI) levels improved by 2%
(From 406 to 418)
Data Reflects Baseline vs Q1 exam)

Office Discipline Referrals Improved by 57%
(From 7 to 3)
Data Reflects (Aug-Sept & October. – January)

Between Quarter 1 and Quarter 2 Attendance decreased by 1%
(From 96% to 95%)

No change in Suspensions as there have been no this year
Data Reflects (Aug-Sept & October. – January)

Lesson Effectiveness
Data suggests the lesson was effective in improving attitudes, knowledge, and skills, which leads to positive and supporting relationships. Additionally, perception data on student conduct reveals that student behavior over time is improving! Outcome data in comparison of Q1 and Q2 Office Discipline Referrals decreased, suggesting students are using empathy skills taught in the classroom.

Data Collection
Collection of perception data was generally intuitive and accessible using an online form with pictures and verbal support from the instructors. There were a few images that were confusing to students due to their complexity and incorrect interpretation of the answer. These will be modified.

Mindsets and Behaviors
Data suggests that M & B aligned with the lesson were met through delivery and evaluation of the unit. Standards targeted, guided the curriculum planning process and evaluation (e.g. B-SMS-1 Assuming responsibility is aligned with the question “When you do something by accident you should… Answer: Apologize and take responsibility”

Modification, Continuation & Additional Recommendations
For the future, additional collaboration with teachers would help in aligning classroom expectations with the skills implemented in the empathy unit. Consider re-evaluating the wording of questions and use of images from Pre/Post tests with classroom teachers for more effective results. Counselor to continue supporting students by implementing periodic "check-ins" for skill reinforcement. Due to its impact, I plan to implement this lesson with modifications for the next academic school year.

Attached Files:
Lesson #2
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | Character Education | Violence Prevention |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
2nd Grade Empathy Unit: Showing Compassion Category 1 Social Emotional/Mindset Standards: (Mindset 2 Self-confidence in ability to succeed) Category 2 Social Emotional/Behavior Standards: (Social Skill 4 Demonstrate Empathy)
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
September 14th 109 Students
Attitudes
35% Decrease in students who believe that everyone should have the same preferences
(Pre 2.83 Post 1.83)

12% increase of students that believe it is important to have compassion for others
(Pre 3.42 Post 3.85)

15% Decrease in students who believe is someone bumps into them it was on purpose.
(Pre 1.95 Post 1.64)

Knowledge
38% increase in students who know what empathy means
(Pre 51% Post 70%)

23% increase in students know the definition of compassion.
(Pre 77% Post 95%)

Skills

15% increase in students who are able to take responsibility and apologize when they do something by accident.
(Pre 83% Post 95%)

Teacher Perceptions
In Work Habits and Social Skills the number of "needs improvement" grades was reduced by 45%
(From 35 to 19)
Data Reflects (Q1 Progress Report & Q2 Report Card)
Math Inventory (MI) levels improved by 2%
(From 406 to 418)
Data Reflects Baseline vs Q1 exam)

Office Discipline Referrals Improved by 57%
(From 7 to 3)
Data Reflects (Aug-Sept & October. – January)

Between Quarter 1 and Quarter 2 Attendance decreased by 1%
(From 96% to 95%)

No change in Suspensions as there have been no this year
Data Reflects (Aug-Sept & October. – January)

Lesson Effectiveness
Data suggests the lesson was effective in improving attitudes, knowledge, and skills, which leads to positive and supporting relationships. Additionally, perception data on student conduct reveals that student behavior over time is improving! Outcome data in comparison of Q1 and Q2 Office Discipline Referrals decreased, suggesting students are using empathy skills taught in the classroom.

Data Collection
Collection of perception data was generally intuitive and accessible using an online form with pictures and verbal support from the instructors. There were a few images that were confusing to students due to their complexity and incorrect interpretation of the answer. These will be modified.

Mindsets and Behaviors
Data suggests that M & B aligned with the lesson were met through delivery and evaluation of the unit. Standards targeted, guided the curriculum planning process and evaluation (e.g. B-SMS-1 Assuming responsibility is aligned with the question “When you do something by accident you should… Answer: Apologize and take responsibility”

Modification, Continuation & Additional Recommendations
For the future, additional collaboration with teachers would help in aligning classroom expectations with the skills implemented in the empathy unit. Consider re-evaluating the wording of questions and use of images from Pre/Post tests with classroom teachers for more effective results. Counselor to continue supporting students by implementing periodic "check-ins" for skill reinforcement. Due to its impact, I plan to implement this lesson with modifications for the next academic school year.

Attached Files:
Lesson #3
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | Character Education | Violence Prevention |
Grade Level Lesson Topic ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s)
2nd Grade Empathy Unit: Predicting Feelings Category 1 Social Emotional Mindset Standards: (Mindset 2 Self-confidence in ability to succeed) Category 2 Social Emotional Behavior Standards: (Self-Management Skills 1. Demonstrate the ability to assume responsibility) Category 2 Social Emotional Behavior Standards: (Social Skill 4 Demonstrate Empathy)
Start/End Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Surveys or assessments used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance, and/or behavior data) Implications
September 15th 109 Students
Attitudes
35% Decrease in students who believe that everyone should have the same preferences
(Pre 2.83 Post 1.83)

12% increase of students that believe it is important to have compassion for others
(Pre 3.42 Post 3.85)

15% Decrease in students who believe is someone bumps into them it was on purpose.
(Pre 1.95 Post 1.64)

Knowledge
38% increase in students who know what empathy means
(Pre 51% Post 70%)

23% increase in students know the definition of compassion.
(Pre 77% Post 95%)

Skills

15% increase in students who are able to take responsibility and apologize when they do something by accident.
(Pre 83% Post 95%)

Teacher Perceptions
In Work Habits and Social Skills the number of "needs improvement" grades was reduced by 45%
(From 35 to 19)
Data Reflects (Q1 Progress Report & Q2 Report Card)
Math Inventory (MI) levels improved by 2%
(From 406 to 418)
Data Reflects Baseline vs Q1 exam)

Office Discipline Referrals Improved by 57%
(From 7 to 3)
Data Reflects (Aug-Sept & October. – January)

Between Quarter 1 and Quarter 2 Attendance decreased by 1%
(From 96% to 95%)

No change in Suspensions as there have been no this year
Data Reflects (Aug-Sept & October. – January)

Lesson Effectiveness
Data suggests the lesson was effective in improving attitudes, knowledge, and skills, which leads to positive and supporting relationships. Additionally, perception data on student conduct reveals that student behavior over time is improving! Outcome data in comparison of Q1 and Q2 Office Discipline Referrals decreased, suggesting students are using empathy skills taught in the classroom.

Data Collection
Collection of perception data was generally intuitive and accessible using an online form with pictures and verbal support from the instructors. There were a few images that were confusing to students due to their complexity and incorrect interpretation of the answer. These will be modified.

Mindsets and Behaviors
Data suggests that M & B aligned with the lesson were met through delivery and evaluation of the unit. Standards targeted, guided the curriculum planning process and evaluation (e.g. B-SMS-1 Assuming responsibility is aligned with the question “When you do something by accident you should… Answer: Apologize and take responsibility”

Modification, Continuation & Additional Recommendations
For the future, additional collaboration with teachers would help in aligning classroom expectations with the skills implemented in the empathy unit. Consider re-evaluating the wording of questions and use of images from Pre/Post tests with classroom teachers for more effective results. Counselor to continue supporting students by implementing periodic "check-ins" for skill reinforcement. Due to its impact, I plan to implement this lesson with modifications for the next academic school year.

Attached Files:
Are the 3 lessons submitted part of the same unit? Yes

10. Small-Group Responsive Services:
Action Plan Reflective of Schools Needs
The school counseling program offers nine targeted, age specific groups to reinforce/reteach skills so they can be successful in the classroom. The attached action plan is a comprehensive plan which provides small group counseling to meet the variety of needs of our students, including social/emotional and academic supports. The groups offered are generally divided by grade level or classes to provide support regarding specific skills and to meet the developmental needs of students. I offer groups primarily based on data, but also develop groups based on needs from student success team meetings or multiple concerns over the year.
To organize groups, I utilize both perception and outcome data to identify students and direct them to a specific group. Every quarter, teachers report on student behavior in the “work habits and social skills” section of the report card. This is their perception of how their student is doing in their classroom. Students who receive multiple “N’s” (Needs Improvement) get filtered as possible group candidates. Office discipline referrals are also a factor that is used for groups. For academics, I review quarterly math and reading scores to see which students need more support and connect an appropriate group for their support.
The main topics covered in groups include Social Skills (Based on Boystown Curriculum), Impulse control, Study Skills (Based on AVID) and Student Success Skills. All groups are aligned with the ASCA Mindsets and behaviors. Lessons are driven by the Mindsets & Behaviors standards to drive the learning in each session. These groups also support our program goals in improving math and reducing chronic absenteeism by removing barriers to learning and building skills that will make them successful.
The "Skits are a Hoot for Little Toots" (Little toots) group is spotlighted in this section. As mentioned in the core curriculum results report, this cohort of students was one of the most highly referred groups in the school. Reviewing the data, I identified 5 students who could benefit from social skills lessons. I chose the skits for it to be more engaging and interactive for the students. The curriculum is based on the widely used Boystown Curriculum, which breaks down social skills in to three to five simple steps. Each day students would review a skill that was an area of concern identified both by the data and teachers. They would perform a skit using a reader's theatre technique and debrief application of the skill in the session.

Mindsets and Behavior integrated within the lesson.
Content in each small group is driven by the selected ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors. In the “Little Toots” group, the standards were selected intentionally to help students to develop: positive and supportive relationships (BS:SS:2), discipline and self-control (B.SMS.2), and assuming responsibility (B.SMS.1) All lessons used in the small group (Respect, Impulse control, Responsibility...etc.) were selected to support the Mindsets & Behaviors standards. To evaluate the learning of these standards, the collection of perception data is driven by language aligned by the Mindsets & Behaviors. For example, I asked questions like: “I believe that at school teachers, and other grown-ups care about me” assessing supporting relationships (BS:SS:2); “I believe it is important to stop and think about my actions before doing them” supporting attitudes around self-control (B.SMS.2); and “Your teacher asked for a volunteer to help her with the class activity. You raised your hand, but she did not pick you. What are the best things to do?” gauging the student’s knowledge of making responsible choices (B.SMS.1). Pre/post-test questions evaluate the change in attitudes, knowledge and skills that were developed during group time.

Results Reports informing future Activities
Implications for the results report provides a critical link for success and provide reflection for improvement. Integral is a cogent rationale for the recommendations. In the “little toots” group, one recommendation was to review aligning the reading level of the curriculum with the level of students in the group. Because students have varying reading levels it is important to take that in to consideration with the topics and activities of the group. In reflection, one area of improvement, especially in supporting behavior, is reinforcing the norms and getting buy-in from students. Doing a pre/post meeting with students may be helpful to support buy-in. Finally, in terms of continuation of the group and the overall success, I believe with the over-all success with improved perception of teachers and the improvement in behavior I would recommend utilizing the group again keeping in mind the recommendations above.

Attached Files:

Small-Group Results Report

Group Name: Skits are a Hoot for Little Toots
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Behavioral Issues | Character Education | Violence Prevention | Attendance |
Goal: 1. To reduce “n’s” (needs improvement) in work habits and social skills 2. Increase Math scores (supporting Program Goal #1) 3. Reduce office referrals by the next progress report 4. Improve Attendance Rates (Supporting Program Goal #2)
Target Group: 2nd Grade
Data Used to Identify Students: Student who received more 3 or more
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Outline of Group Sessions Delivered
Mr. Zanartu School Counselor Ms. Caoile (Intern) SE B LS 4
4. Apply self-motivation and self-direction to learning
SE B SMS 1
1. Demonstrate ability to assume responsibility
SE B SMS 2
2. Demonstrate self-discipline and self-control
SE B SMS 4
4. Demonstrate ability to delay immediate gratification for long-term rewards
SE B SS 2
2. Create positive and supportive relationships with other students
SE B SS 9
9. Demonstrate social maturity and behaviors appropriate to the situation and environment
1. Introduction (Norms, Process, Confidentiality & Pre test)
2. Impulsivity
3. Competitiveness
4. Being Respectful
5. Being Responsible
6. Bossiness
7. Motivation
8. Conclusion (Skill Review, Post test and Celebration)
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
8 sessions
40 minutes
1-2 times a week
5 Students
Attitudes
2.6 % increase in students who believe there are adults that care about me
(3.8 to 3.9)

2.6 Increase in student who believe adults want them to do their best
(3.9 to 4.0)

8 % increase in students who feel happy at school
(3.7 to 4.0)

No change in beliefs about stopping and thinking before acting
(3.5 to 3.5)

Knowledge
300 % increase in definition of motivation (from 20% to 80%)

No change in knowledge of the three school rules
80% to 80%

Skills
Identifying the a social skill to use (connected to impulsivity) did not change from 100% to 100%

Work habits and social skills grades
70% Drop in Needs improvement grades
(From 10 to 3)
MI Scores (Math)
5% increase in Math scores
(From 387 to 407)

Attendance
10% decrease in Absences
(From Avg. 2.0 to 1.8 Absences)

Office Referrals
66% Drop in Office Displace Referrals
(from 3 to 1)

(Data Reflects Quarter 1 & Quarter 2)
Effectiveness of Results
Behavior for group participants tremendously improved; however, their knowledge in the lessons were minimal
Students were taking a new assessment that varied from the one given in years past, in consultation with teachers, many students struggled in both math and reading assessments; nevertheless, students in the small group showed growth.
Data Collection
Although lessons were connected with the mindsets and behaviors, collaboration with counselors in partner schools as well as teachers must be used in the future to improve the quality of pre/post questions collected in perception data. Perception data from teachers was easy to collect and analyze and provides mid-range data on trends of the students with respect to behavior.
Mindsets and Behaviors
All lessons were guided with the mindsets and behavior standards,
Recommendations
Be sure to collaborate with teachers & librarian regarding reading level and align with curriculum. Because reading is critical to this curriculum, it is better tailored for middle 2nd grade and 3rd grade reading levels.

Improvements
Because this is a group focused on behavior, classroom management and norms are critical for the success of the group. The perception data was not an accurate indicator of success in the group. Consultation for improvement of evaluation is critical to evaluate effectiveness. Student had conflicting behaviors entering and leaving the group so it would be helpful to consider doing a pre/post meeting with students individually to ensure buy-in for the group.
Continuation
Group demonstrated a large impact on behavior & attendance supporting program goals. Only with changes above, I recommend implementing this group for grades 2 & 3.

11. Closing-the-Gap Results Report:
Goal: By the end of the 2017-2018 School Year, all students in 3rd through 5th grade will increase their proficiency in math (Meets Standard and Exceeds Standard) by 10% from 40% to 44% as measured by the fourth quarter Scholastic Math Assessment (SMI).
Key Words That the Lesson Addresses:
Academic Achievement | Group Counseling |
Target Group: Students who fell fall below in 3rd and 4th grade in math and are identified as “low SES”
Data Used to Identify Students: SMI or MI Scores from end of Quarter 1
School Counselor(s) ASCA Domain, Mindsets & Behaviors Standard(s) Type of Activities to be Delivered in What Manner?
Felipe Zanartu Social Emotional M.5 5. Belief in using abilities to their fullest to achieve high-quality results and outcomes Academic B.LS.4 4. Apply self-motivation and self-direction to learning Academic B.LS.3 3. Use time-management, organizational and study skills Academic B.SS.1 1. Use effective oral and written communication skills and listening skills 1. Group Counseling on Skills Skills based on AVID Strategies
2. Weekly Progress Monitoring (Individual Meetings with students and teachers)
3. Weekly
 Check in and Check out with Counselor (Individual Meetings)

See more details in attached document "Closing the Gap Results Report"
Process Data (Number of students affected) Perception Data (Data from surveys used) Outcome Data (Achievement, attendance and/or behavior data collected) Implications
14 Students affected
Intervention started in October 2017 and Concluded in June 2018
Attitudes
100% increase in students who believe that coming to school organized and prepared creates better grades and test scores
(from 1.48 to 3.25)

11% increase in attitudes of feeling organized, motivated and prepared when coming to school.
(from 3.2 to 3.56)

Knowledge

50% increase in knowledge of using Agenda for academic preparation.
(from 60% to 90%)

167% increase in students who could identify the first step in STAR notes (Set up notes) from AVID from 38.5% to 100%

100% increase in students who could identify SLANT (AVID focus and attention strategy) from 37% to 75%

Skills
50% increase in students who could correctly identify the best study skill option to take in a scenario (two column notes) from 50% to 75%

Work habits and social skills from quarterly Report card Q2 to Q3
3rd Grade
PBIS Grades (behavior)
66.67% Drop in N’s
(from 10 to 4)

4th Grade
PBIS Grades (behavior)
16.67% Drop in N’s
(from 8 to 7)

Perception from Progress Monitoring & Check-in Check-out   3rd Grade
Period #1
4% increase in Work Habits and & Study Skill as rated by teachers
(From 3.5-3.7)

Period #2
17% increase in Work Habits and & Study Skill as rated by teachers
(From 3.7 to 3.9)

Work Habits and Social Skills Grades
-Be respectful
-Be Responsible
-Be Safe
Q3 to Q4
50% Drop in N’s
(from 4 to 2)

 4th Grade
Period #1
6% increase in Work Habits and & Study Skill as rated by teachers
(From 3.1-3.3)

Period #2
9% increase in Work Habits and & Study Skill as rated by teachers
(From 3.2 to 3.5)

Work Habits and Social Skills Grades
-Be respectful
-Be Responsible
-Be Safe
Q3 to Q4
57% Drop in N’s
(From 7 to 3)
Average Math Inventory Scores

45% Improvement
From 338 to 490
(Data Reflects Q2 and End of year Assessment )

Proficiency Levels
3rd Grade
• 5 students moved up in proficiency levels
• 1 Remained the same
• 0 Reached Proficiency
4th Grade
• 6 Students moved up a proficiency Band from Below Basic to Basic
• 2 Students Remained the same
0 Students Reached Proficiency
Effectiveness of Interventions
The small group focused on study skills strategies adapted from AVID and included, organizational skills, star note taking, focus and annotation techniques. Perception data collected indicated an improvement in attitudes knowledge and skills aligned with skills taught in small group.
Large increases in change of attitudes, knowledge and skills suggest that students are going to utilize academic study skills in the classroom. Outcome data supports this conclusion with double-digit increase in both math in the CTG group.

Data Collection
I gave students a pre and post-test before and after group. The questions aligned with the mindsets and behaviors standards as well as the AVID study skills (e.g. Note taking, Organization, focus/attention techniques) taught in the lesson. As a result of the interventions, attitudes, knowledge and skills related to the group improved. Data collected showing the teacher’s perception of the students as documented on the report card of (respectful, responsible & safe) indicated progress. The result was a drastic change in perceptions of student behavior. The student and teacher perceptions change contributed to an immediate improvement in students' academic scores.

Mindsets & Behaviors
The pre and posttest questions were aligned to the mindsets and behaviors selected for the closing the gap group.

Additions Modifications & Continuation
The data suggests that intervention was successful. A recommended modification would be to implement this intervention for more students as many of them were successful with the help. I would recommend repeating this intervention due to the positive impact on every student!

See more details in attached document "Closing the Gap Results Report"

Attached Files:Closing the Gap Results Report Narrative.
The purpose of any closing the gap activity is to build a multi-tiered system for a targeted group of students to close a “gap” in the areas of attendance, behavior or academics. During the last few years, Avaxat has had tremendous growth in reading scores. One of the principal’s goals for the year was to shift the focus of professional development from reading to math to address our student’s lower scores in math. In alignment with the school goals, my program goals #1 addressed improvements in math.

Goal defined through data
One large gap that I found in data analysis was the opportunity gap due to a student’s economic status. The goal was defined through data by disaggregating the scores of all students vs. students who came from households of low SES. This was determined by cross-referencing all students with those who received free and reduced lunch. What I found at the end of the 2017 school year was that there was a 58-point gap on average between these two groups. On average, these student’s scores were about 12% lower than the school average. (See attached "Gap Table")

Selection of Interventions and Activities
In grades 3 and 4, I targeted the bottom 10 students in Math scores, disaggregated by Low SES, to participate in small groups with an emphasis on study skills. Of the initial 20, 14 returned permission slips and I worked with them on study skills based on AVID strategies. As mentioned before our school implements AVID strategies such as STAR Note taking, organizational skills, WICOR (Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, Reading) and SLANT (Sit up, lean forward, ask and answer, nod your head, track the speaker). All of these practices are considered best practices for learning; nevertheless, some kids need more. In three small groups, I implemented study and focus/attention skills practice with students.
Following the group, I implemented multi-tiered supports to sustain progress post group. First, I developed a weekly progress-monitoring card, which asked students to implement academic related skills like showing effort, completing homework, being organized and participation. The card gauges students & teachers to share their perception on progress of skills learned in group. I implemented this process by collaborating with teachers to build the support. When students demonstrate the use of skills learned in group (e.g. organization & participation) it opens up opportunities for success which influence both marks in class as well as test scores. On top of implementing progress-monitoring checks with teachers, I also implemented a weekly version of a check in/checkout to review progress made and set goals for the students. Check in/check out is considered a best practice within any PBIS framework and I thought it would be helpful to reinforce the academic behaviors of my students.
Data Results
The interventions planned throughout the year utilized different strategies to reinforce learning. I implemented group demonstrations, role-plays, scenarios, and skill practices utilizing a resource called avid weekly, which creates short articles about current events to practice study skills such as annotation, note taking and organization. By coordinating with their teachers, we established time lines that minimized the impact on the classroom. As a result, implementation of the small group was successful evidenced by the perception data of students and teachers and the outcome data in math. The pre and posttests were aligned with the mindsets and behaviors standards to implement within the group. This included: Social emotional M5 referring to achieving high outcomes and developing a positive attitude towards learning, B:LS3 which focuses on organization and study skills. The standards are integrated with in the pre/post questions as well as with teacher and counselor check-ins to make the intervention successful. The school’s outcome data suggested there was growth across the board in math; nevertheless, the school average growth was 16%, Low SES general Group 30%, and the closing the gap group 44%. There is still a lot of room to grow; however, by growing at the fastest rate suggests that the intervention was working to close the achievement gap for these students. Due to the positive results in perception & outcome data and successful collaboration with teachers and counselors to impact learning, I highly recommend continuing this intervention. I’m looking to modify this for the next year to impact student behavior and to disaggregate with other subgroups.

12. Program Evaluation Reflection:Reflection of the Avaxat School Counseling Program
The Avaxat School Counseling Program embodies leadership, advocacy and collaboration to effect systemic change for students’ benefit. I lead using a core structure built on the foundational aspects of the ASCA Model, work collaboratively with stakeholders empowering and inspiring them to act, and use policy, procedure and practice to ensure students’ access to a quality education. Program advocacy is multifaceted, involving my work done to empower students to act as well as my work with stakeholders on behalf of students, assuring they have the best chance to succeed. Collaboration runs through every aspect of school counselor delivery from core lessons to sitting in a student study team meeting.
Leadership
A comprehensive program of any kind requires structural leadership leading to systemic change. This begins by building a strong foundation with a mission and vision aligned with that of the site and district. The Avaxat school counseling program has worked to align our mission and vision closely to site, district, county, and state directives to ensure continuity with the larger system. The school counseling program is intentionally comprehensive and includes multiple tiers of service to effectively serve all students. The program works to ensure equity by implementing targeted tiered interventions to close achievement or opportunity gaps. At Tier 1, we provide all students services via the core curriculum, with instruction around the attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed to be successful at school. At Tier 2, small group responsive services provide targeted support to some, based on specific student needs. At Tier 3, a small number receive individualized support to help remove learning barriers (e.g. behavior) so they can be successful. In this way, I have used structural leadership to create systemic change through the establishment of a service delivery model whereby all students receive the level of service that best fits their needs.
Leadership also involves a human element. Working together with stakeholders (e.g. teachers, administration, and families) allows the program to work effectively to assist students. In building relationships with staff and community, the program becomes accessible and visibly open to partnerships, initiatives, and constructive criticism. Communicating shared beliefs and values with stakeholders allows them to buy-in and build confidence in the program, which builds institutional and political legitimacy.
I exercise institutional and political leadership by my involvement in board meetings, administration meetings, leadership meetings, and site council meetings so that the school counseling program has representation in site and district decision-making. By being present and being familiar with policies, procedures, and practices, the school counseling program can align its role within student support, intervention and prevention. Building this institutional legitimacy also allows stakeholders to turn to the program for assistance to meet the ongoing needs of students, which ensures systemic change.
Finally, I utilize symbolic leadership to effect systemic change. Leading by example and acting consistently with the ASCA ethical standards ensures (site and district counseling meetings) that the school counseling program is relevant and up to date. For example, I present at state and county conferences, attend national conferences and other relevant professional development. One must also be humble and demonstrate an openness to criticism and change. This is demonstrated through end of year presentations to staff, counselor/administration meetings and in school counseling advisory councils. In each setting I am demonstrating the strength of the program and specifically elicit feedback in order to improve my practice and to create focused change to impact student outcomes. The program models a process of self-evaluation and self-improvement, reviewing areas of strength and areas of growth to effectively create systemic change, which leads to better outcomes for students.
Collaboration
Building relationships with stakeholders enhances my work toward improving student outcomes. I build partnerships based on trust, sharing ideas and partnering on decision-making. Sharing information through such mechanisms as program results presentations and results reports allows others to build confidence in and work more collaboratively with the program. As a school counselor, I not only partner with teachers, students, families, and community members, but also with site leadership teams (e.g. School Site Council, Administration Team and School Leadership Team). Working together with teams allows the school counseling program to build goals, annual agreements, and action plans, which support and augment the work that is being done by teachers, staff, administration, and parents.
The collaboration has resulted in the establishment of a comprehensive school counseling program that meets the needs of all students. Additionally, activities such as school wide social skill videos and student valet which support students continue to be established and solidified by stakeholders that are partnering with the school counseling program. Collaborative activities and programs include daily social skill videos to support behavior, student valet to impact attendance and character/college messages to plant the seeds of college readiness. As I continue to work closely with teams and individuals, the collaboration creates systemic change, which fosters a healthy and supportive environment for all to positively affect students.
Advocacy
Advocating for and on behalf of students is powerful in creating systemic change. Through direct services (e.g. Core lessons, small groups, individual and family support) I empower students and families to make good and informed choices. When students have the attitudes, knowledge, and skills to be successful, they are able to advocate for themselves and make decisions that will help them work well with others, be successful in school, and become lifelong learners. Indirectly, I am also advocating in my daily collaborative work with stakeholders. This includes work with teachers and parents to partner on key interventions, which support positive student outcomes (e.g. improving attendance, academics, and behavior change).
Our school counseling advisory council provides examples of advocacy facilitated by relationship and shared decision making. Through the advisory council I established, I am able to advocate for the resources and systems required to address students’ needs and, in turn, the members are empowered to advocate on behalf of students as well. Participation allows the school counseling program to adapt and change based on external feedback. Through the advocacy of the school counselor and advisory council members, the program’s core curriculum plans and program goals have been continually adjusted. This shared decision-making process allows the school counseling program to create systemic change not only by receiving input but also by sharing its perspectives on factors that affect students. This collaborative advocacy fosters student learning which leads to system change.
Advocacy, much like political leadership, involves work via many decision-making bodies. Through participation in committees (e.g. PBIS and site leadership), I am able to advocate for the needs of students. For example, in this way I have assisted in developing systems where kids learn best (e.g. social skills lessons in the classroom), and created systems in which stakeholders, including the school counselor, can target specific needs of students such as the use of work habits and social skills, and most recently targeting low level referrals). By building systems whereby the program can effectively impact the students we serve, systemic change is achieved.
Systemic Change
The school counseling program at Avaxat Elementary is committed to fostering systems change whereby barriers to learning are removed. In this way, students have access to educational opportunities, which allows them to become college and career ready! Promoting activities that give students tools via changes in attitudes, knowledge and skills to work well with their peers allows them to gain a high-quality education and be knowledgeable and ready to access post-secondary opportunities including college. For example, because of the systems change by the school counseling program, ALL students now receive social-emotional support in empathy, emotion management, problem solving and bully prevention. This has resulted in fewer office referrals, an overall three-year decrease in attendance issues, and positive academic outcomes!
Core Components of the ASCA National Model (Mission, Vision, Program Goals, Mindsets and behaviors) provide the foundation. This has led us to implementing systems change through use of data in the management of the program (20% or less of our time) (Advisory Council, Calendars, Data collection tools, and action plans) as well as through delivery of direct and indirect services (80% or more of our time). The program has changed from being a reactive system which met the needs of few to a proactive and preventative system through which a tiered intervention process meets the needs of all. Balancing delivery and management to the 80/20 ratio has allowed the program to be more efficient and accountable! Now I connect activities to lessons, and curriculum and program outcomes foster accountability (Results Reports, Analysis of process, perception and outcome data and program evaluation and improvement).
The process is not a quick fix but a continual process of conceptualization, planning, implementation, evaluation and reflection. This allows me to be a better school counselor every year, create systems change that educate and empower students to achieve academic success, develop life skills to become life-long learners, be creative thinkers, and become responsible community members in a diverse changing world.

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